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2.
International Conference on Information Systems and Intelligent Applications, ICISIA 2022 ; 550 LNNS:465-476, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2148567

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of Covid-19 has changed the lifestyle of people nowadays. Students has to adapt to the new norms in which they need to rely on the digital mediums to interact with others. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between social media use and the connectedness among the university students in Malaysia during this pandemic of Covid-19. It also aims to investigate connection between the purposes of social media use (academic, socialization, entertainment and informativeness) and the level of social connectedness. Thirdly, the genders difference between social media use and social connectedness are investigated. The measurement used include the online social networking usage questionnaire and the social connectedness scale, and were distributed through snowball sampling method via the online platforms. A total of 300 respondents were recruited in this study with the mean age of 22.26. The results indicate that no significant relationship between social media usage and social connectedness. However, there was significant relationship between the purposes of using social media and social connectedness. Thirdly, no difference was found between females and males on the social media usage and social connectedness. Finally, this study highlights that the purpose of using social media could enhance the social relationship. © 2023, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

3.
Annals of Oncology ; 33(Supplement 9):S1528-S1529, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2129911

ABSTRACT

Background: Managing head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) requires a prolonged course of concurrent chemoradiotherapy and other supportive care measures. Such a multidisciplinary approach was significantly hampered during the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic which necessitated divergence of health resources towards treating the infected patients thereby compromising cancer care. Therefore, we adopted an alternate-day hypofractionated radiotherapy (ADH RT) schedule, aiming to decrease patients' hospital visits daily without compromising the oncological outcomes. This study assesses the response and toxicity of the ADH RT schedule in HNSCC patients. Method(s): Retrospective analysis of all histopathologically proven HNSCC patients treated with ADH RT regimen during April - October 2020 in our institute. Hypofractionation dose schedule: 63Gy/21 fractions, 3Gy/fraction was delivered on alternate days without concurrent chemotherapy after patients' consent. Weekly radiation toxicity assessment and post-radiotherapy response assessment by CECT face and neck at 3 and 6 months. Result(s): A total of 26 patients were planned for ADH RT. Most (96%) of them were males with a median age of 60 years and ECOG PS <=2. The most common tumor site was the oropharynx (58%), the stage was IVA (54%) followed by stage IVB (27%). 93% of patients had a history of tobacco smoking. Only 23 patients completed the treatment and were included in the final assessment. Mucositis and dermatitis grade 1, 2 and 3 was observed in 44%, 52%, 4% and 78%, 18%, and 4% patients, respectively. At three months of follow-up, 5 patients were lost to follow-up and 4 patients expired due to COVID/disease-related complications. Complete response (CR) was observed in 10 patients (71.4%) and partial response in 4 patients. At 6 months, CR was observed in 7 (64.5%) patients. Conclusion(s): Most of the patients were able to tolerate and complete treatment. At analysis, around half of the patients either expired or were lost to follow-up which is the major limitation of this study. Among the available patients, a good response was observed. The practical applicability of this regimen needs to be tested further with a larger sample size and longer follow-up. Legal entity responsible for the study: The authors. Funding(s): Has not received any funding. Disclosure: All authors have declared no conflicts of interest. Copyright © 2022

5.
Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs ; 36(2):121-123, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011524

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic started by the SARS-CoV-2 virus from China hit different parts of the world and caused till now the first, second and third waves at different time periods from March 2020 to December 2021. Virus variants emerged to cause these waves with altered behaviour and severity of the disease and difficulty in the management of the pandemic. An unexpected upsurge happened during these waves due to social reasons and policies. In this article, we discuss the variations in the waves from a few geographic locations which will give us a better understanding of regional effects and precautions needed for the future. © 2022 Society for Biomaterials and Artificial Organs - India. All rights reserved.

6.
7.
Indian Journal of Law and Justice ; 13(1):364-385, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1940069

ABSTRACT

Patent pools covers agreements whereby two or more parties agree to pool their respective technologies and license them as a package. It facilitates public health management of IP through a partnership between an entity with a public health mandate on one hand and private pharmaceutical companies on the other hand. This model of access-oriented and nonexclusive voluntary licensing mechanisms with a clear public health mandate can contribute to achieving this goal of Universal Health coverage and can overcome a number of access and innovation challenges in the biopharmaceutical field. This can be substantiated by analyzing the successful Medicines Patent pool. The benefits of collaborative research and an efficient patent pool could also be witnessed when COVID-19 pandemic was declared as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern by the World Health Organization (WHO) on January 30, 2020, where they launched the COVID-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) with a Solidarity Call to Action for sharing intellectual property on treatments and vaccines. © 2022, Department of Law, University of North Bengal. All rights reserved.

8.
HemaSphere ; 6(SUPPL 2):16-17, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1915867

ABSTRACT

G protein-coupled receptor family C group 5 member D (GPRC5D) has limited expression in healthy human tissue but is highly expressed in malignant plasma cells, making it a promising target for immunotherapy approaches for MM. Talquetamab (JNJ-64407564) is a first-in-class bispecific antibody that binds to both GPRC5D and CD3 receptors to redirect T cells to kill MM cells. Updated and new results of talquetamab at the recommended phase 2 doses (RP2Ds) are reported (NCT03399799). Eligible patients had RRMM or were intolerant to standard therapies. Patients who were previously treated with B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-directed therapies were eligible. This analysis focuses on patients who received talquetamab subcutaneously (SC;range: 5.0-800 μg/kg) weekly (QW) or biweekly (Q2W) with step-up dosing. The primary objectives were to identify the RP2D (part 1) and assess talquetamab safety and tolerability at the RP2Ds (part 2). Adverse events (AEs) were graded by CTCAE v4.03;cytokine release syndrome (CRS) was graded per Lee et al 2014 criteria. Responses were investigator-assessed per IMWG criteria. As of July 19, 2021, 95 patients had received SC talquetamab. The original RP2D was 405 μg/kg SC talquetamab QW with step-up doses, and a second RP2D of 800 μg/kg SC talquetamab Q2W with step-up doses was also identified. 30 patients received 405 μg/kg QW (median 61.5 years [range 46-80];63% male;100% triple-class exposed;80% penta-drug exposed;77% triple-class refractory, 20% penta-drug refractory;30% prior BCMA-directed therapy;median follow-up [mF/U]: 7.5 mo [range 0.9-15.2]). 23 patients received 800 μg/kg Q2W (median 60.0 years [range 47-84];48% male;96% triple-class exposed;70% penta-drug exposed;65% triple-class refractory, 22% penta-drug refractory;17% prior BCMA-directed therapy;mF/U: 3.7 mo [range 0.0-12.0]). No treatment discontinuations due to AEs were reported at either RP2Ds. Most common AEs at the 405 μg/kg QW were CRS (73%;1 grade 3 CRS), neutropenia (67%;grade 3/4: 60%), and dysgeusia (60%;grade 2: 29%). Skin-related AEs occurred in 77% of patients and were all grade 1/2 (nail disorders: 30%). Infections occurred in 37% of patients (1 grade 3 COVID-19 pneumonia). Most common AEs at 800 μg/kg Q2W were CRS (78%;all grade 1/2), dry mouth (44%;all grade 1/2), and neutropenia (44%;grade 3/4: 35%). Skin-related AEs occurred in 65% of patients with grade 3 events in 13% (nail disorders: 17%). Infections occurred in 13% of patients (1 grade 3 pneumococcal sepsis). In 30 response-evaluable patients treated at 405 μg/kg QW, the overall response rate (ORR) was 70% (very good partial response or better [≥VGPR]: 57%). In 17 response-evaluable patients treated at 800 μg/ kg Q2W, the ORR was 71% (≥VGPR: 53%). Responses were durable and deepened over time with both RP2Ds (Figure). Median duration of response (DOR) was not reached at either RP2D;6-month DOR rate was 67% (95% CI: 41-84) at 405 μg/kg QW. Serum trough levels of talquetamab were comparable at both RP2Ds. Pharmacodynamic data at both RP2Ds showed peripheral T cell activation and induction of cytokines. SC talquetamab is well tolerated and highly effective at both RP2Ds. Preliminary data suggest that less frequent, higher doses of SC talquetamab do not negatively impact the safety profile. Further evaluation of talquetamab as monotherapy (phase 2;NCT04634552) and in combination with other therapies in patients with RRMM is underway. (Figure Presented) .

9.
Infectious Microbes and Diseases ; 4(1):26-33, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1806682

ABSTRACT

Hypoxic patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at high risk of adverse outcomes. Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has shown anti-viral and immunomodulatory effects in vitro. However, in vivo evidence of efficacy in hypoxic COVID-19 is sparse. This open label feasibility study was conducted at a single referral center in South India and evaluated the effectiveness of repurposed iNO in improving clinical outcomes in COVID-19 and its correlation with viral clearance. We recruited hypoxemic COVID-19 patients and allocated them into treatment (iNO) and control groups (1:1). Viral clearance on day 5 favored the treatment group (100% vs 72%, P < 0.01). The speed of viral clearance as adjudged by normalized longitudinal cycle threshold (Ct) values was positively impacted in the treatment group. The proportion of patients who attained clinical improvement, defined as a ≥2-point change on the World Health Organization ordinal scale, was higher in the iNO cohort (n = 11, 79%) as compared to the control group (n = 4, 36%) (odds ratio 6.42, 95% confidence interval 1.09-37.73, P = 0.032). The proportion of patients progressing to mechanical ventilation in the control group (4/11) was significantly higher than in the treatment group (0/14). The all-cause 28-day mortality was significantly different among the study arms, with 36% (4/11) of the patients dying in the control group while none died in the treatment group. The numbers needed to treat to prevent an additional poor outcome of death was estimated to be 2.8. Our study demonstrates the putative role of repurposed iNO in hypoxemic COVID-19 patients and calls for extended validation. Copyright © 2021 the Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.

10.
Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry ; 36(SUPPL 1):S62, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1767695

ABSTRACT

Validation of AG-Q COVID-19 N-Antigen Self- VTest in comparison with Real Time RT-PCR Ajaikumar Sukumaran, Arun Krishnan, Rhema Thomas, Jofy Paul, D M Vasudevan Introduction Currently, RT-PCR and the rapid antigen test (RAT) are the major stakeholders in COVID-19 diagnosis. The RTPCR is the gold standard testing method and RAT is considered for mass screening of COVID-19. In order to improve the accessibility and pace of diagnosis, ICMR had given permission for COVID-19 self-test by the public. AG-Q COVID-19 N-Antigen Self-Test kit is a home based rapid test kit developed by Agappe Diagnostics Limited. The kit has been validated at NIMS Medicity, Trivandrum and compared the performance with the RT-PCR Ct value. Aim Validation and comparison of AG-Q COVID-19 N-Antigen self-test with RT-PCR. Materials & Methods The AG-Q COVID19 N-Antigen self-test is a lateral flow immunochromatography based rapid test. The Covipath COVID-19 RT-PCR kit from ThermoFisher Scientific was used for the comparison study. A total of 72 subjects were recruited (30 positive & 42 negative subjects) for the study with the Institutional Ethical Committee approval and informed consent from the subjects. To perform the comparison study, a nasal swab sample in lysis buffe for RAT and a nasopharyngeal swab sample in VTM for RT-PCR were collected from each participants. Result The AG-Q COVID-19 N-Antigen self-test offers 100% specificity with sensitivity of 83.33%. Conclusion As per the study result, the AG-Q COVID-19 N-Antigen self-test is satisfying the ICMR recommended specificity and sensitivity for rapid antigen self-test as compared with the RT-PCR.

12.
National Journal of Community Medicine ; 12(12):439-443, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1614183

ABSTRACT

Introduction: To plan and implement effective control measures, knowledge about basic hygiene and the mechanism of disease transmission, and practices adopted in such circumstances is of utmost importance. Non-professional health care workers working in a tertiary care hospital is at a major risk than general population in contracting a pandemic. This study was undertaken to assess the awareness, attitude and practice during COVID-19 pandemic among non-health care workers in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the awareness, attitude and practice of non-health care workers. Personnel in pharmacy, patient service and food and security were taken as subjects. The subjects were also categorised according to their educational status. Results: The knowledge, attitude and practice scores and the total combined scores were found to be statistically significant based on the occupation and educational status of the subjects. Pharmacy personnel had better awareness and those with higher educational status were found to have favourable attitude and practice scores. Conclusion: The non-health care workers were found to have adequate knowledge, attitude and practice behaviour regarding prevention of Covid infection. Educational status of the subjects influenced their awareness, attitude and practice. © The Journal retains the copyrights of this article. However, reproduction is permissible with due acknowledgement of the source.

13.
Blood ; 138:158, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582394

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Despite recent advances in treatment, patients with multiple myeloma (MM) continue to relapse. G protein-coupled receptor family C group 5 member D (GPRC5D) is a promising target for immunotherapy in patients with MM due to its high expression in malignant plasma cells and limited expression in normal human tissue;unlike other antigens targeted by MM therapies, there is no indication that GPRC5D sheds into the periphery. Talquetamab (JNJ-64407564) is a first-in-class bispecific IgG4 antibody that redirects T cells to kill MM cells by binding to both GPRC5D and CD3 receptors. Here we report updated and new results of talquetamab at the recommended phase 2 doses (RP2Ds) from a phase 1 trial in relapsed/refractory MM (RRMM;NCT03399799). Methods: Eligible patients with MM had relapsed or refractory disease or were intolerant to standard therapies;patients previously treated with B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-directed therapies were eligible. This analysis focuses on patients who received talquetamab subcutaneously (SC;range 5.0-800 µg/kg) weekly or biweekly. Step-up dosing was used as a patient management strategy to minimize the severity of cytokine release syndrome (CRS). The primary objectives were to identify the RP2D (part 1) and assess talquetamab safety and tolerability at the RP2Ds (part 2). Adverse events (AEs) were graded by CTCAE v4.03 with CRS events graded per Lee et al 2014 criteria. Responses were investigator-assessed per International Myeloma Working Group criteria. Results: As of July 19, 2021, 95 patients have received SC talquetamab. The RP2D was originally identified as a weekly SC dose of 405 µg/kg talquetamab with step-up doses. However, alternative dosing schedules that require less frequent administration continue to be investigated. A biweekly RP2D was also identified as an SC dose of 800 µg/kg talquetamab with step-up doses. 30 patients received the 405 µg/kg weekly dosing schedule (median age: 61.5 years [range 46-80];63% male;100% triple-class exposed;80% penta-drug exposed;77% triple-class refractory, 20% penta-drug refractory;30% prior BCMA-directed therapy;median follow-up: 7.5 mo [range 0.9-15.2]). 23 patients received the 800 µg/kg biweekly dosing schedule (median age: 60.0 years [range 47-84];48% male;96% triple-class exposed;70% penta-drug exposed;65% triple-class refractory, 22% penta-drug refractory;17% prior BCMA-directed therapy;median follow-up 3.7 mo [range 0.0-12.0]). There were no treatment discontinuations due to AEs at either of the RP2Ds. The most common AEs at the 405 µg/kg weekly dose were CRS (73%;1 patient had grade 3 CRS), neutropenia (67%;grade 3/4: 60%), and dysgeusia (60%;grade 2: 29%);skin-related AEs occurred in 77% (all grade 1/2;nail disorders: 30%) of patients, and infections occurred in 37% of patients (1 patient had grade 3 COVID-19 pneumonia). The most common AEs at the 800 µg/kg biweekly dose were CRS (78%;all grade 1/2), dry mouth (44%;all grade 1/2), and neutropenia (44%;grade 3/4: 35%);skin-related AEs occurred in 65% of patients (grade 3: 13%;nail disorders: 17%) and infections occurred in 13% of patients (1 patient had grade 3 pneumococcal sepsis). In 30 response-evaluable patients treated with the 405 µg/kg weekly dose, the overall response rate (ORR) was 70% (very good partial response or better [≥VGPR] rate: 57%). In 17 response-evaluable patients treated with the 800 µg/kg biweekly dose, the ORR was 71% (≥VGPR rate: 53%). Responses were durable and deepened over time in both cohorts (Figure). Median duration of response (DOR) was not reached at either RP2D;the 6-month DOR rate for patients who received the 405 µg/kg weekly dose was 67% [95% CI: 41-84]. Serum trough levels of talquetamab were comparable at both RP2Ds. Consistent with the mechanism of action for talquetamab, pharmacodynamic data from cohorts treated at both dose levels showed peripheral T-cell activation and induction of cytokines. Conclusions: These findings indicate that SC talquetamab is well tolerated and highly effective at both RP2Ds. Preliminary data from the 800 µg/kg biweekly cohorts indicate that less frequent, higher doses of SC talquetamab do not have a negative impact on the previously described safety profile. Further investigation of talquetamab as monotherapy (phase 2;NCT04634552) and in combination with other therapies in patients with RRMM is underway. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Krishnan: MAGENTA: Consultancy;BMS: Consultancy, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company, Speakers Bureau;JANSSEN: Consultancy, Research Funding;City of Hope Cancer Center: Current Employment;REGENERON: Consultancy;SANOFI: Consultancy;GSK: Consultancy;Amgen: Speakers Bureau. Minnema: Celgene: Other: Travel expenses;Alnylam: Consultancy;Cilag: Consultancy;BMS: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy;Kite/Gilead: Consultancy. Berdeja: Lilly, Novartis: Research Funding;Abbvie, Acetylon, Amgen: Research Funding;Celularity, CRISPR Therapeutics: Research Funding;EMD Sorono, Genentech: Research Funding;Poseida, Sanofi, Teva: Research Funding;Bluebird bio, BMS, Celgene, CRISPR Therapeutics, Janssen, Kite Pharma, Legend Biotech, SecuraBio, Takeda: Consultancy;GSK, Ichnos Sciences, Incyte: Research Funding. Oriol: Sanofi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Karyopharm: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Oncopeptides: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS/Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. van de Donk: Roche: Consultancy;Takeda: Consultancy;Cellectis: Research Funding;Amgen: Consultancy, Research Funding;Janssen: Consultancy, Research Funding;BMS/Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria;Novartis /bayer/servier: Consultancy. Rodriguez-Otero: Clínica Universidad de Navarra: Current Employment;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Celgene-BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Pfizer: Consultancy;Sanofi: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Kite: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Amgen: Honoraria;Regeneron: Honoraria. Askari: Janssen: Research Funding. Mateos: Sanofi: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Sea-Gen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Pfizer: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Regeneron: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Amgen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Janssen: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Celgene - Bristol Myers Squibb: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Takeda: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Adaptive Biotechnologies: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Oncopeptides: Honoraria;Bluebird bio: Honoraria;AbbVie: Honoraria;GSK: Honoraria;Oncopeptides: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Roche: Honoraria, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Costa: BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding;Amgen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Research Funding, Speakers Bureau;Karyopharm: Consultancy, Honoraria;Pfizer: Consultancy, Honoraria;Sanofi: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Burea . Verona: Janssen: Current Employment. Ma: Janssen: Current Employment, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company. Girgis: Janssen: Current Employment, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company. Yang: Janssen: Current Employment. Hilder: Janssen: Current Employment, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company. Russell: Janssen: Ended employment in the past 24 months. Goldberg: Janssen: Current Employment, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company. Chari: Shattuck Labs: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Seattle Genetics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Millenium/Takeda: Consultancy, Research Funding;Sanofi Genzyme: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Karyopharm: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS/Celgene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Antengene: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Takeda: Consultancy, Research Funding;Amgen: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Pharmacyclics: Research Funding;Secura Bio: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Oncopeptides: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;AbbVie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;GlaxoSmithKline: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Novartis: Consultancy, Research Funding;Genentech: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisorycommittees;Janssen Oncology: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding.

14.
Current Science ; 121(9):1147-1147, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1535542
15.
2nd International Conference on Electronics and Sustainable Communication Systems, ICESC 2021 ; : 1074-1081, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1470301

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk of contracting a deadly virus in public places such as malls, streets, or local shops. These essential places have proven to be hotspots for the dissemination of the coronavirus. One of the most efficient ways to curb the spread is to maintain social distancing. Currently, due to the lack of strict supervision, social distancing is not being followed. The paper provides a solution to implement a smart device meant to detect social distancing violations in public areas. The paper also compares three detection approaches, namely the You Only Look Once (YOLO) approach and its variants, the Histogram of Oriented Gradients - Support Vector Machine (HOG-SVM) approach, and the top view camera angle approach to detect these violations. The most practical approach, i.e., the YOLOv3-tiny, was loaded onto the Raspberry Pi to make a fully automated device. The paper also addresses the design flow, the working of the different approaches, and the future scope in advancements. © 2021 IEEE.

16.
Journal of the Neurological Sciences ; 429, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466684

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: We conducted TOP-PRO-study, a double-blind RCT, to know whether propranolol is as efficacious as topiramate for the prevention of CM. In this paper, we report the secondary efficacy outcomes. Primary efficacy outcome showing the non-inferiority of propranolol have been described in another paper. Methods: CM patients aged above 18 years and less than 65 years of age, not on any preventive treatment were randomly allocated to receive topiramate (100 mg/day) or propranolol (160 mg/day). Secondary outcomes were mean change per 28 days at the end of 24 weeks compared to baseline in headache days, acute migraine treatment (AMT) days, visual analog scale (VAS) scores, headache impact-6 (HIT-6) scores, migraine specific quality of life (MSQOL) score and achievement of more than 50% reduction in headache days. Results: COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown halted the recruitment before the trial reached the planned sample size of 244. Of the 175 randomized patients, 95 (topiramate 46 and propranolol 49) completed the trial. The two groups were matched in terms of age, sex and baseline headache parameters. At the end of 24 weeks, both groups showed similar mean improvements in headache days per 28 days (−7.7 vs −7.8;p = 0.928), >50% responder rate (32.6% vs 34.7%), AMT days (−6.7 vs −7.0;p = 0.835), VAS score (−1.7 vs −2.2;p = 0.355), HIT-6 score (−5.2 vs −7.3;p = 0.153), MSQOL score (−5.8 vs −9.3;p = 0.098). Conclusions: Propranolol was as efficacious as topiramate for the prevention of CM as assessed by multiple secondary outcome parameters. (Academic study: Clinical Trials Registry-India CTRI/2019/05/018997).

17.
Journal of the Neurological Sciences ; 429, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1466655

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: Except for topiramate, oral preventive treatment for chronic migraine (CM) lacks credible evidence. We conducted TOP-PRO-study, a double-blind RCT, to know whether propranolol is as efficacious (non-inferior) and safe as topiramate for the prevention of CM. Methods: CM patients aged above 18 years and less than 65 years of age, not on any preventive treatment were randomly allocated to receive topiramate (100 mg/day) or propranolol (160 mg/day). The primary efficacy outcome was change in migraine days per 28 days at the end of 24 weeks from baseline. A mean difference of 1.5 days per four weeks was chosen as the cut-off delta value. Safety was also assessed. Results: COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown halted the recruitment before the trial reached the planned sample size of 244. Of the 175 randomized patients, 95 (topiramate 46 and propranolol 49) completed the trial. At baseline, mean (± SD) migraine days were 17.3 ± 6.7 vs 17.6 ± 6.6 days for patients in the topiramate and propranolol group respectively. The mean migraine days change was −5.29 ± 1.17 vs −7.28 ± 1.14 days (p = 0.226) for topiramate and propranolol groups respectively. Propranolol was found to be non-inferior and not superior to topiramate (point estimate of −1.99 with a CI of −5.23 to 1.25 days). There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse events between the two groups. Conclusions: Our study found that propranolol was non-inferior, non-superior to topiramate, and equally safe for the preventive treatment of CM. (Academic study: Clinical Trials Registry-India CTRI/2019/05/018997).

19.
Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs ; 35(2):115-116, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1339932

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 pandemic is re-emerging in 2021 as a second wave and the disease behaviour is different from the second wave. India is currently in the second wave and mitigating the disease spread and loss of lives. Patients are facing sudden reduced oxygen saturation leading to more number of hospitalization and immediate need for oxygen administration. This has led to an acute shortage of oxygen supply to healthcare facilities and increased mortality. In this article, we discuss the various medical oxygen devices available and their advantages for appropriate use in this pandemic. © (2021) Society for Biomaterials & Artificial Organs.

20.
Trends in Biomaterials and Artificial Organs ; 34:60-61, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1339915

ABSTRACT

The current outbreak of COVID-19 has infected people worldwide with high mortality rates. Prevention of spread of the virus is of prime importance and is planned by a global lockdown. This has caused severe shortage of vital protective and medical supplies due to reduced manufacturing and supply chain. 3D printing technology is widely used in industries, hospitals and by enthusiasists. Thus, 3D printing of people protective equipments and respiratory devices in every regional available 3D printing facilities will be a vital source of manufacturing in this pandemic. In this article we discuss the role of 3D printing and contributions from the dental sector in combating the fight against COVID-19. © (2020) Society for Biomaterials & Artificial Organs.

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