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1.
J Hosp Med ; 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2103590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reducing unnecessary routine laboratory testing is a Choosing Wisely® recommendation, and new areas of overuse were noted during the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To reduce unnecessary repetitive routine laboratory testing for patients with COVID-19 during the pandemic across a large safety net health system. DESIGNS, SETTINGS AND PARTICIPANTS: This quality improvement initiative was initiated by the System High-Value Care Council at New York City Health + Hospitals (H + H), the largest public healthcare system in the United States consisting of 11 acute care hospitals. INTERVENTION: four overused laboratory tests in noncritically ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were identified: C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and procalcitonin. A two-pronged electronic health record intervention was implemented consisting of (1) nonintrusive, informational nudge statements placed on selected order sets, and (2) a forcing function of one consecutive day limit on ordering. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: The average of excess tests per encounter days (ETPED) for each of four target laboratory testing only in patients with COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: Interdisciplinary System High-Value Care Council identified four overused laboratory tests (inflammatory markers) in noncritically ill hospitalized patients with COVID-19: C-reactive protein (CRP), ferritin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and procalcitonin. Within an 11-hospital safety net health system, a two-pronged electronic health record intervention was implemented consisting of (1) nonintrusive, informational nudge statements placed on selected order sets, and (2) a forcing function of one consecutive day limit on ordering. The preintervention period (March 16, 2020 to January 24, 2021) was compared to the postintervention period (January 25, 2021 to March 22, 2022). RESULTS: Time series linear regression showed decreases in CRP (-17.9%, p < .05), ferritin (-37.6%, p < .001), and LDH (-30.1%, p < .001). Slope differences were significant (CRP, ferritin, and LDH p < 0.001; procalcitonin p < 0.05). Decreases were observed across weekly averages: CRP (-19%, p < .01), ferritin (-37.9%, p < .001), LDH (-28.7%, p < .001), and procalcitonin (-18.4%, p < .05). CONCLUSION: This intervention was associated with reduced routine inflammatory marker testing in non-intensive care unit COVID-19 hospitalized patients across 11 hospitals. Variation was high among individual hospitals.

2.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(11): e0271, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-900575

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We describe the key elements for a New York City health system to rapidly implement telecritical care consultative services to a newly created ICU during the coronavirus disease 2020 patient surge. DESIGN: This was a rapid quality-improvement initiative using public health decrees, a HIPAA-compliant and device-agnostic telemedicine patform, and a group of out-of-state intensivist volunteers to enhance critical care support. Telecritical care volunteers initially provided on-demand consults but then shifted to round twice daily with housestaff in a 12-bed newly created ICU. SETTING: A 457-bed safety net hospital in the Bronx, NY, during the pandemic. SUBJECTS: The 12-bed newly created ICU was staffed by a telecritical care attending, a cardiology fellow, and internal medicine residents. INTERVENTION: Prior to the intervention, the ad hoc ICU was staffed by a cardiology fellow as the attending of record, with critical care support on demand. The intervention involved twice daily rounding with an out-of-state, volunteer intensivist. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Volunteers logged 352 encounters. Data from 26 unique encounters during the initial on-demand consult pilot study of tele-ICU support were recorded. The most common interventions were diagnostic test interpretation, ventilator management, and sedation change. The majority of housestaff felt the new tele-ICU service improved the quality of care of patients and decreased anxiety of taking care of complex patients. Likewise, the majority of volunteers expressed making significant alterations to care, and 100% believed critical care input was needed for these patients. The largest lessons learned centered around mandating the use of the telecritical care volunteers and integration into a structured format of rounding. CONCLUSIONS: The need for rapid implementation of ICUs during a major public health crisis can be challenging. Our pilot study supports the feasibility of using an out-of-state telecritical care service to support ICUs, particularly in areas where resources are limited.

3.
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes ; 13(11): e007303, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-796493

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients hospitalized for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection are at risk for in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA). It is unknown whether certain characteristics of cardiac arrest care and outcomes of IHCAs during the COVID-19 pandemic differed compared with a pre-COVID-19 period. METHODS: All patients who experienced an IHCA at our hospital from March 1, 2020 through May 15, 2020, during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, and those who had an IHCA from January 1, 2019 to December 31, 2019 were identified. All patient data were extracted from our hospital's Get With The Guidelines-Resuscitation registry, a prospective hospital-based archive of IHCA data. Baseline characteristics of patients, interventions, and overall outcomes of IHCAs during the COVID-19 pandemic were compared with IHCAs in 2019, before the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: There were 125 IHCAs during a 2.5-month period at our hospital during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic compared with 117 IHCAs in all of 2019. IHCAs during the COVID-19 pandemic occurred more often on general medicine wards than in intensive care units (46% versus 33%; 19% versus 60% in 2019; P<0.001), were overall shorter in duration (median time of 11 minutes [8.5-26.5] versus 15 minutes [7.0-20.0], P=0.001), led to fewer endotracheal intubations (52% versus 85%, P<0.001), and had overall worse survival rates (3% versus 13%; P=0.007) compared with IHCAs before the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who experienced an IHCA during the COVID-19 pandemic had overall worse survival compared with those who had an IHCA before the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings highlight important differences between these 2 time periods. Further study is needed on cardiac arrest care in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Cardiology Service, Hospital , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Heart Arrest/therapy , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Public , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Heart Arrest/diagnosis , Heart Arrest/mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
5.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 60(2): e14-e17, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-436856

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 surge in New York City created an increased demand for palliative care (PC) services. In staff-limited settings such as safety net systems, and amid growing reports of health care worker illness, leveraging help from less-affected areas around the country may provide an untapped source of support. A national social media outreach effort recruited 413 telepalliative medicine volunteers (TPMVs). After expedited credentialing and onboarding of 67 TPMVs, a two-week pilot was initiated in partnership with five public health hospitals without any previous existing telehealth structure. The volunteers completed 109 PC consults in the pilot period. Survey feedback from TPMVs and on-site PC providers was largely positive, with areas of improvement identified around electronic health record navigation and continuity of care. This was a successful, proof of concept, and quality improvement initiative leveraging TPMVs from across the nation for a PC pandemic response in a safety net system.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Personnel , Palliative Care , Personnel Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Telemedicine , Volunteers , COVID-19 , Continuity of Patient Care , Electronic Health Records , Hospitals, Public , Humans , New York City , Palliative Care/methods , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Pandemics , Personnel Selection/methods , Pilot Projects , Proof of Concept Study , Quality Improvement , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
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