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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742448

ABSTRACT

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, affecting around 2.8 million people worldwide. Patients' knowledge about COVID-19 infection, and their proper protective actions, may reduce the risk of infection. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of patients with MS about SARS-CoV-2, COVID-19 illness, the relationship between MS and COVID-19, willingness to be vaccinated, and the impact of the pandemic on MS care. An original, anonymous, 35-items, self-reported questionnaire was used in both web-based and on-site survey formats. Two-hundred and forty-eight questionnaires were analyzed (mean age 40.8 ± 10.6 years, 77.8% women). Participants reported the use of multiple sources of information, and the most common were websites (77.8%) and television (59.3%). The majority of participants knew the correct symptoms of COVID-19 or transmission routes (94.4%), and accepted the pandemic's restrictions (96.8%). A total of 93.2% considered SARS-CoV-2 as highly infectious, and 69% thought they were at higher risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2, mainly because of immunodeficiency (82.7%). Although most of them were afraid of COVID-19 (69.0%), only two-thirds wanted to be vaccinated. Patients who were afraid of COVID-19 had a 3.5-times higher chance to declare willingness for vaccination. A total of 29.8% patients claimed that the COVID-19 pandemic limited access to the healthcare system. This study shows that Polish patients with MS represent a good level of knowledge about COVID-19 disease, and acceptance for public rules, but their willingness for vaccinations is not sufficient. Country-wide educational campaigns should be conducted, particularly on the internet and TV. Restrictions in healthcare facilities should be balanced to secure access for patients with MS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 9(11)2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523937

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Staying at home for long periods and limiting various types of activities and social contacts due to the COVID-19 pandemic may have negative consequences for health. This is especially true for people suffering from chronic diseases, in whom an appropriate level of activity and social contacts delay the progress of the disease. This group includes people diagnosed with Parkinson's disease-PD. AIM: It was decided to investigate the effect of COVID-19 isolation related to self-assessment of physical fitness, physical activity, and the level of anxiety and depression in people with PD. METHODS: The study included 30 patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease. We compared the results of the pre-pandemic questionnaire and the telephone interview with the same questions-after the period of isolation due to COVID-19. The questionnaire included questions about physical activity and fitness self-assessment. The level of affective disorders was tested using HADS. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant decrease in the physical activity of the respondents after isolation related to COVID-19 (p < 0.05). Self-assessment of physical fitness also decreased, but the differences were not statistically significant. In the post-isolation study, only 50% of the respondents had normative values for anxiety and only 40% for depression. The analysis showed that the level of physical activity-the independent variable, explains anxiety in 30% and depression in 27%. CONCLUSIONS: Pandemic isolation has significantly reduced physical activity in PD patients. There was a certain drop in the self-esteem of physical fitness in these people. Physical fitness is an important predictor of preventing the affective disorders of anxiety and depression. The effects of isolation due to COVID-19 require further research.

3.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(8)2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389440

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2, causes acute respiratory disease (coronavirus disease 2019; COVID-19). However, the involvement of other mechanisms is also possible, and neurological complications are being diagnosed more frequently. Here, we would like to present a case of a Polish patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), after a documented history of COVID-19: A 50-year-old man, 18 days after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms, had progressive quadriparesis preceded by 1-day sensory disturbances. Based on the clinical picture, the results of diagnostic work-up including a nerve conduction study (ENG) that revealed a demyelinating and axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis that showed albumin-cytological dissociation, an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy was confirmed, consistent with GBS. Upon a therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), the patient's condition improved. The presented case of GBS in a patient after mild COVID-19 is the first case in Poland that has supplemented those already described in the global literature. Attention should be drawn to the possibility of GBS occurring after SARS-CoV-2 infection, even when it has a mild course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Plasma Exchange , Quadriplegia , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(8)2021 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335148

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2, causes acute respiratory disease (coronavirus disease 2019; COVID-19). However, the involvement of other mechanisms is also possible, and neurological complications are being diagnosed more frequently. Here, we would like to present a case of a Polish patient with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), after a documented history of COVID-19: A 50-year-old man, 18 days after the onset of COVID-19 symptoms, had progressive quadriparesis preceded by 1-day sensory disturbances. Based on the clinical picture, the results of diagnostic work-up including a nerve conduction study (ENG) that revealed a demyelinating and axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis that showed albumin-cytological dissociation, an acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy was confirmed, consistent with GBS. Upon a therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), the patient's condition improved. The presented case of GBS in a patient after mild COVID-19 is the first case in Poland that has supplemented those already described in the global literature. Attention should be drawn to the possibility of GBS occurring after SARS-CoV-2 infection, even when it has a mild course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Plasma Exchange , Quadriplegia , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Neuroradiol J ; 34(2): 147-150, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975845

ABSTRACT

We present a case of a fatal cerebral haemorrhage in an 82-year-old male patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), who was taking prophylactic oral anticoagulation because of atrial fibrillation (rivaroxaban 20 mg q.d. for two years). On admission, the patient was deeply comatose, mechanically ventilated, with tachycardia up to 150 bpm, high blood pressure >210/120 mmHg and a body temperature >39°C. A computed tomography scan of the head showed a large intracerebral haemorrhage located in the deep structures of the right hemisphere, with a mass effect and bleeding to the ventricles. Rivaroxaban was discontinued at admission. The patient tested positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), but he did not have typical symptoms of pneumonia. In the following days, the patient's neurological condition did not improve, and a fever of up to 40°C and abnormal coagulation parameters remained resistant to pharmacotherapy. The patient developed multi-system organ failure and died on day 8. Here, we review the recent literature and discuss the possible association of SARS-CoV-2-mediated endothelial injury and cardiovascular disorders with cerebrovascular complications. We postulate that anti-inflammatory treatment in COVID-19 and the stabilisation of endothelium functions can be particularly important in patients with pre-existing cardiovascular conditions.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , COVID-19/complications , Cerebral Hemorrhage/etiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Hypertension/complications , Rivaroxaban/adverse effects , Stroke/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Atrial Fibrillation/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cerebral Hemorrhage/diagnostic imaging , Cerebral Hemorrhage/therapy , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Hypotension/etiology , Male , Multiple Organ Failure/etiology , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/etiology , Tachycardia/etiology
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