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2.
Front Pharmacol ; 12: 652335, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526785

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). It has a disastrous effect on mankind due to the contagious and rapid nature of its spread. Although vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 have been successfully developed, the proven, effective, and specific therapeutic molecules are yet to be identified for the treatment. The repurposing of existing drugs and recognition of new medicines are continuously in progress. Efforts are being made to single out plant-based novel therapeutic compounds. As a result, some of these biomolecules are in their testing phase. During these efforts, the whole-genome sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 has given the direction to explore the omics systems and approaches to overcome this unprecedented health challenge globally. Genome, proteome, and metagenome sequence analyses have helped identify virus nature, thereby assisting in understanding the molecular mechanism, structural understanding, and disease propagation. The multi-omics approaches offer various tools and strategies for identifying potential therapeutic biomolecules for COVID-19 and exploring the plants producing biomolecules that can be used as biopharmaceutical products. This review explores the available multi-omics approaches and their scope to investigate the therapeutic promises of plant-based biomolecules in treating SARS-CoV-2 infection.

4.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 25(5): 599-600, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229410

ABSTRACT

How to cite this article: Naaz S, Kumar A, Sahay N, Kumar R, Ozair E, Valiaparambath A. Defecation and Micturition may Cause Syncope in COVID-19 Patients on High Oxygen Requirement. Indian J Crit Care Med 2021;25(5):599-600.

6.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int ; 28(30): 40431-40444, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030736

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has affected the entire world with its infectious spread and mortality rate. The severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are characterized by hypoxia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. In the absence of any specific treatment, just the preventive and supportive care options are available. Therefore, much focus is given to assess the available therapeutic options not only to avoid acute respiratory failure and hypoxia but also to reduce the viral load to control the severity of the disease. The antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is among the much-discussed drugs for the treatment and management of COVID-19 patients. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of HCQ in the treatment of COVID-19 based on the available in vitro and clinical evidence, current status of registered HCQ-based clinical trials investigating therapeutic options for COVID-19, and environmental implications of HCQ.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Antiviral Agents , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Biomol Struct Dyn ; 40(8): 3609-3625, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939480

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has created a healthcare crisis across the world and has put human life under life-threatening circumstances. The recent discovery of the crystallized structure of the main protease (Mpro) from SARS-CoV-2 has provided an opportunity for utilizing computational tools as an effective method for drug discovery. Targeting viral replication has remained an effective strategy for drug development. Mpro of SARS-COV-2 is the key protein in viral replication as it is involved in the processing of polyproteins to various structural and nonstructural proteins. Thus, Mpro represents a key target for the inhibition of viral replication specifically for SARS-CoV-2. We have used a virtual screening strategy by targeting Mpro against a library of commercially available compounds to identify potential inhibitors. After initial identification of hits by molecular docking-based virtual screening further MM/GBSA, predictive ADME analysis, and molecular dynamics simulation were performed. The virtual screening resulted in the identification of twenty-five top scoring structurally diverse hits that have free energy of binding (ΔG) values in the range of -26-06 (for compound AO-854/10413043) to -59.81 Kcal/mol (for compound 329/06315047). Moreover, the top-scoring hits have favorable AMDE properties as calculated using in silico algorithms. Additionally, the molecular dynamics simulation revealed the stable nature of protein-ligand interaction and provided information about the amino acid residues involved in binding. Overall, this study led to the identification of potential SARS-CoV-2 Mpro hit compounds with favorable pharmacokinetic properties. We believe that the outcome of this study can help to develop novel Mpro inhibitors to tackle this pandemic.Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , COVID-19/drug therapy , Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 582025, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890344

ABSTRACT

The recent outbreak of the COVID-2019 (coronavirus disease 2019) due to the infectious severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has realized the requirement of alternative therapeutics to mitigate and alleviate this lethal infection. These alternative therapies are effective when they are started at the initial stage of the infection. Some drugs that were used in previous other related infections SARS-CoV-2003 and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-2012 could be potentially active against currently emerging SARS-CoV-2. This fact imparts some rationale of current interventions, in the absence of any specific therapeutics for SARS-CoV-2. It is imperative to focus on the available antimicrobial and adjunct therapies during the current emergency state and overcome the challenges associated with the absence of robust controlled studies. There is no established set of drugs to manage SARS-CoV-2 infected patients. However, closely following patients' conditions and responding with the dosage guidelines of available drugs may significantly impact our ability to slow down the infection. Of note, it depends upon the condition of the patients and associated comorbid; therefore, the health workers need to choose the drug combinations judiciously until COVID-19 specific drug or vaccine is developed with the collective scientific rigor. In this article, we reviewed the available antimicrobial drug, supportive therapies, and probable high importance vaccines for the COVID-19 treatment.

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