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1.
Arch Womens Ment Health ; 25(1): 137-146, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469700

ABSTRACT

The role of resilience in mediating the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of US women is poorly understood. We examined socioeconomic factors associated with low resilience in women, the relationship of low resilience with psychiatric morbidity, and the mediating role of resilience in the relationship between pandemic-related stress and other coincident psychiatric morbidities. Using a quota-based sample from a national panel, we conducted a web-based survey of 3200 US women in April 2020. Weighted, multivariate logistic regression was used to model the odds of pandemic-related stress, and coincident depression and anxiety symptoms among those with and without low resilience. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate resilience as a mediator of the relationship between pandemic-related stress and other coincident psychiatric morbidities. Risk factors for low resilience included younger age, lower household income, lower education, unemployment, East/Southeast Asian race, unmarried/unpartnered status, and higher number of medical comorbidities. Low resilience was significantly associated with greater odds of depression symptoms (OR = 3.78, 95% CI [3.10-4.60]), anxiety symptoms (OR = 4.17, 95% CI [3.40-5.11]), and pandemic-related stress (OR = 2.86, 95% CI [2.26-3.26]). Resilience acted as a partial mediator in the association between pandemic-related stress and anxiety symptoms (proportion mediated = 0.23) and depression symptoms (proportion mediated = 0.28). In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, low resilience mediated the association between pandemic-related stress and psychiatric morbidity. Strategies proven to enhance resilience, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based stress reduction, and addressing socioeconomic factors, may help mitigate mental health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 72: 209-215, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385038

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Both arterial and venous thrombotic events of the extremities occur in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, but the etiology of these events remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate pathology specimens of COVID-19-positive patients postamputation, who were found to have Rutherford 3 acute limb ischemia requiring amputation. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all vascular surgery emergency room and inpatient consultations in patients who presented to the Mount Sinai Health System from March 26, 2020, to May 10, 2020. Pathology specimens were examined using hematoxylin and eosin stain. The specimens were assessed for the following: inflammatory cells associated with endothelium/apoptotic bodies, mononuclear cells, small vessel congestion, and lymphocytic endotheliitis. Of the specimens evaluated, 2 patients with a known history of peripheral vascular disease were excluded. RESULTS: Inflammatory cells associated with endothelium/apoptotic bodies were seen in all 4 patients and in 4 of 5 specimens. Mononuclear cells were found in 2 of 4 patients. Small vessel congestion was seen in all patients. Lymphocytic endotheliitis was seen in 1 of 4 patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows endotheliitis in amputation specimens of four patients with COVID-19 disease and Rutherford Class 3 acute limb ischemia. The findings in these patients is more likely an infectious angiitis because of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/surgery , Thrombosis/surgery , Thrombosis/virology , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 30(4): 502-513, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169611

ABSTRACT

Background: During a pandemic, women may be especially vulnerable to secondary health problems driven by its social and economic effects. We examined the relationship between changes in health-related socioeconomic risks (HRSRs) and mental health. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 3,200 women aged 18-90 years was conducted in April 2020 using a quota-based sample from a national panel (88% cooperation rate). Patterns of change in HRSRs (food insecurity, housing instability, interpersonal violence, and difficulties with utilities and transportation) were described. Weighted, multivariate logistic regression was used to model the odds of depression, anxiety, and traumatic stress symptoms among those with and without incident or worsening HRSRs. Results: More than 40% of women had one or more prepandemic HRSRs. In the early pandemic phase, 49% of all women, including 29% with no prepandemic HRSRs, had experienced incident or worsening HRSRs. By April 2020, the rates of depression and anxiety were twice that of prepandemic benchmarks (29%); 17% of women had symptoms of traumatic stress. The odds of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms were two to three times higher among women who reported at least one incident or worsening HRSR; this finding was similar for women with and without prepandemic HRSRs. Conclusions: Increased health-related socioeconomic vulnerability among U.S. women early in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic was prevalent and associated with alarmingly high rates of mental health problems. Pandemic-related mental health needs are likely to be much greater than currently available resources, especially for vulnerable women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Socioeconomic Factors , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
4.
Ann Vasc Surg ; 72: 209-215, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1056323

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Both arterial and venous thrombotic events of the extremities occur in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, but the etiology of these events remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate pathology specimens of COVID-19-positive patients postamputation, who were found to have Rutherford 3 acute limb ischemia requiring amputation. METHODS: A retrospective review was performed of all vascular surgery emergency room and inpatient consultations in patients who presented to the Mount Sinai Health System from March 26, 2020, to May 10, 2020. Pathology specimens were examined using hematoxylin and eosin stain. The specimens were assessed for the following: inflammatory cells associated with endothelium/apoptotic bodies, mononuclear cells, small vessel congestion, and lymphocytic endotheliitis. Of the specimens evaluated, 2 patients with a known history of peripheral vascular disease were excluded. RESULTS: Inflammatory cells associated with endothelium/apoptotic bodies were seen in all 4 patients and in 4 of 5 specimens. Mononuclear cells were found in 2 of 4 patients. Small vessel congestion was seen in all patients. Lymphocytic endotheliitis was seen in 1 of 4 patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows endotheliitis in amputation specimens of four patients with COVID-19 disease and Rutherford Class 3 acute limb ischemia. The findings in these patients is more likely an infectious angiitis because of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Amputation , COVID-19/complications , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Lower Extremity/blood supply , Lower Extremity/surgery , Thrombosis/surgery , Thrombosis/virology , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Phytomedicine ; 85: 153317, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-741455

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) playing havoc across the globe caused 585,727 deaths and 13,616,593 confirmed cases so far as per World Health Organization data released till 17th July 2020. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV- 2) is responsible for causing this pandemic across different continents. It is not only impacting the world economy but also quarantined millions of people in their homes or hospitals. PURPOSE: At present, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug or vaccine available to treat this disease. Still, people are trying various pre-existing medicines that are known to have anti-viral or anti-parasitic effects. In view of this, the present study aimed to study the binding potential of various phytochemicals present in multiple natural plant extract as a secondary metabolite to non-structural protein 15 (Nsp15) protein, a drug target known to play a crucial role in virulence of coronavirus. METHOD: Nsp15 protein was selected because it shows 89% similarity to the other SARS-CoV, which caused the earlier outbreak. The assumption is that inhibition of Nsp15 slowdowns the viral replication. Phytochemicals are selected as these are present in various plant parts (seed, flower, roots, etc.), which are used in different food cuisines in different geographical regions across the globe. The molecular docking approach was performed using two different software, i.e., Autodock, and Swissdock, to study the interaction of various phytochemicals with Nsp15 protein. Hydroxychloroquine is used as a positive control as it is used by medical professionals showing some positive effects in dealing with coronavirus. RESULTS: The present study demonstrated the binding potential of approximately 50 phytochemicals with Nsp15 and capable of inhibiting the viral replication, although in vitro and in vivo tests are required to confirm these findings. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the present study successfully demonstrated the binding of phytochemicals such as sarsasapogenin, ursonic acid, curcumin, ajmalicine, novobiocin, silymarin and aranotin, piperine, gingerol, rosmarinic acid, and alpha terpinyl acetate to Nsp15 viral protein and they might play a key role in inhibiting SARS-CoV-2 replication.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Endoribonucleases/antagonists & inhibitors , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Virus Replication/drug effects , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Software
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