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1.
Clin Exp Nephrol ; 26(5): 476-485, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709135

ABSTRACT

The number of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection continues to increase, and it has become a global pandemic. Although there is an urgent need to establish an effective treatment, the medication available for dialysis patients has been limited. An antibody cocktail containing two SARS-CoV-2-neutrarizing antibodies, REGN-COV2 has been granted special approval for COVID-19 in Japan, since July 2021, and this intravenous preparation can be used for dialysis patients. At our hospital, we had 22 hemodialysis patients with COVID-19, and five of them were treated with REGN-COV2. On admission, four of the five patients had moderate disease (pneumonia but O2 inhalation) and one patient had mild disease (not having pneumonia). The mean duration of hospitalization treated with REGN-COV2 was 10.2 ± 2.86 days (mean ± SD), which was less than half, compared to patients untreated of similar severity on admission (22.12 ± 15.5). The time to fever resolution was average 7 days, and no cases progressed to severe illness or death. Among these patients, no obvious adverse reactions were shown. Although more studies with a larger number of patients could be needed for a rigorous evaluation of the effect, our result suggests that REGN-COV2 may be safe and having the possibilities in preventing severe disease in hemodialysis patients. Given the difficulty in securing inpatient beds tend to be in short supply, the strategy combined with neutralizing antibody could be beneficial for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients with hemodialysis who are at high risk of severe disease.

2.
Cureus ; 13(9): e18233, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497835

ABSTRACT

Background During the ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95 respirators) are in short supply in many countries. Considering this, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggested reusing N95 respirators and recommended the use of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI) for sterilizing the respirators. However, only a few reports have described UVGI protocols for sterilizing the N95 respirators for reuse. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to develop and evaluate a novel method for the reuse of N95 respirators after sterilization by UVGI. Methods Before conducting the study, the function of N95 respirators after multiple UVGI with a total dose of up to 10 J (1 J/cm2 or more per dose) was assessed by measuring the particle collection efficiency and ventilation resistance. The participants used N95 respirators during work if they passed the fit test. After use, the respirators were sterilized using UVGI (1 J/cm2) and stored in a breathable paper bag for a week. The procedure was repeated up to three times after confirming the successful results of the fit tests. Results The particle collection efficiency without UVGI was 96.7%, while those after one, five, and 10 cycles of UGVI were 96.8%, 97.2%, and 97.2%, respectively. Ventilation resistance without UVGI was 42 Pa, and 43 Pa, 42 Pa, and 41 Pa after one, five, and 10 cycles of UVGI, respectively, which satisfied the Japanese national certification standard DS2. All 43 participants passed the fit test before the first reuse, and 39 participants (90.7%) completed the entire study protocol. The results of this study showed that N95 respirators could be used safely after repeated UVGI treatment. Conclusions This study developed a novel method for reusing the N95 respirators. A few cycles of UV radiation N95 masks retain their functionalities and can be reused with proper UVGI.

3.
Cureus ; 13(2): e13542, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150958

ABSTRACT

Objectives A surge in the demand for N95 filtering facepiece respirators (N95 respirators) due to the worldwide spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a global shortage of N95 respirators. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical validation of reusing N95 respirators following stringent fit test protocols. Methods After passing the first fit test, we prospectively enrolled healthcare workers who used N95 respirators for two hours per shift (duckbill-shaped HPR-R/HPR-S, dome-shaped Hi-Luck 350, and three-panel flat-fold respirators 9211) in settings such as bronchoscopy or respiratory specimen sampling. These procedures were repeated for up to three weeks, with the fit test performed every week. At each timing of the fit test, we used a fit-testing system for quantitatively evaluating particle leakage. Results A total of 41 participants were enrolled, including 24 doctors and 17 nurses, of whom 25 were women. The pass rate of successful reuse over three observational weeks using four fit tests was 85.4%, which was comparable among the three types of N95 respirators. Six (14.6%) participants failed the fit test, while no participants dropped out of protocol due to either N95 respirator damage or contamination. Among the six dropped out participants, four reused the duckbill-shaped type and two reused the three-panel flat-fold type. All participants using the cup-shaped type mask successfully completed the protocol. However, the passing rate of this study was not statistically different among the three types of N95 respirators. Conclusion This study shows that N95 respirators can be safely reused for a short period irrespective of their type, as quantitatively assessed by fit tests.

5.
RMD Open ; 6(2)2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066937

ABSTRACT

Reactive arthritis (ReA) is typically preceded by sexually transmitted disease or gastrointestinal infection. An association has also been reported with bacterial and viral respiratory infections. Herein, we report the first case of ReA after the he severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. This male patient is in his 50s who was admitted with COVID-19 pneumonia. On the second day of admission, SARS-CoV-2 PCR was positive from nasopharyngeal swab specimen. Despite starting standard dose of favipiravir, his respiratory condition deteriorated during hospitalisation. On the fourth hospital day, he developed acute respiratory distress syndrome and was intubated. On day 11, he was successfully extubated, subsequently completing a 14-day course of favipiravir. On day 21, 1 day after starting physical therapy, he developed acute bilateral arthritis in his ankles, with mild enthesitis in his right Achilles tendon, without rash, conjunctivitis, or preceding diarrhoea or urethritis. Arthrocentesis of his left ankle revealed mild inflammatory fluid without monosodium urate or calcium pyrophosphate crystals. Culture of synovial fluid was negative. Plain X-rays of his ankles and feet showed no erosive changes or enthesophytes. Tests for syphilis, HIV, anti-streptolysin O (ASO), Mycoplasma, Chlamydia pneumoniae, antinuclear antibody, rheumatoid factor, anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody and Human Leukocyte Antigen-B27 (HLA-B27) were negative. Gonococcal and Chlamydia trachomatis urine PCR were also negative. He was diagnosed with ReA. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug (NSAID)s and intra-articular corticosteroid injection resulted in moderate improvement.


Subject(s)
Ankle Joint/diagnostic imaging , Arthritis, Reactive/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Amides/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Reactive/drug therapy , Arthritis, Reactive/etiology , Arthrocentesis , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Humans , Injections, Intra-Articular , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pyrazines/therapeutic use , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Intern Med ; 59(24): 3213-3216, 2020 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902224

ABSTRACT

A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia with a chief complaint of persistent low-grade fever and dry cough for two weeks. Thoracic computed tomography demonstrated a crazy paving pattern in the bilateral lower lobes. In a COVID-19 ward, we used a novel wireless stethoscope with a telemedicine system and successfully recorded and shared the lung sounds in real-time between the red and green zones. The fine crackles at the posterior right lower lung fields changed from mid-to-late (day 1) to late inspiratory crackles (day 3), which disappeared at day 5 along with an improvement in both the clinical symptoms and thoracic CT findings.


Subject(s)
Auscultation/instrumentation , COVID-19/diagnosis , Respiratory Sounds/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Stethoscopes , Telemedicine/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Equipment Design , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
7.
The Journal of the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases ; 94(4):528-534, 2020.
Article in Japanese | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-696384

ABSTRACT

We encountered two female patients with COVID-19  Eone transferred from the cruise ship, Diamond Princess, docked in the Yokohama port, and the other with community transmission of the infection. The former patient had asymptomatic pneumonia, which subsided spontaneously. The latter patient suffered from severe rapidly worsening pneumonia which necessitated mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, but eventually showed complete resolution of the disease. Although the lung involvement in those two cases at their first evaluation seemed to be equal, they exhibited very different clinical courses  Eone showing self-limiting asymptomatic pneumonia and the other showing severe progressive pneumonia.

8.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 146(2): 330-331, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597639
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