Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 38
Filter
1.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 20(10): 908-916, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2144914

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Evidence on living donor kidney transplant procedures when both the donor and recipient have had a history of COVID-19 infection is scarce. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively explored the protocol, outcomes, and follow-up of 64 donors and recipients of living donor kidney transplant who had recovered from COVID-19. This was a multicenter (n = 12) study from India that included transplants between October 29, 2020, and December 1, 2021. Induction and immunosuppression regimens forthose with different severities of COVID-19 were similar to standard practice. RESULTS: COVID-19 clinical severity ranged from asymptomatic/mild (not requiring oxygen therapy) in 49 recipients (77%) and 63 donors (95.4%) and moderate/severe (requiring oxygen therapy) in 15 recipients (23%) and 1 donor (4.6%). Mean wait time±SEM (SD)from firstdocumentednegative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction testto surgery for recipients and donors was 90.9 ± 9.27 (74.1) and 47 ± 4.5 (29.2) days, respectively. Six episodes (9.3%) of biopsy-proven acute rejection were reported at follow-up of 214 ± 14.8 (119) days and median of 227 (interquartile range, 109-309) days. The locally weighted scatter plot smoothing curve for creatinine during follow-up in donor-recipients pairs showed no trends of increased creatinine in the context of wait time from COVID-19 to transplant surgery. No graft loss, death, reactivation/reinfection, and complications related to surgery or COVID-19 were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Our report showed excellent outcomes and follow-up data of living donor kidney transplant in recovered donor-recipient pairs with the standard immunosuppression protocol. To our knowledge, this is the first and the largest study of donor-recipient living donor kidney transplant pairs when both donors and recipients had prior COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Humans , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/methods , Living Donors , Graft Survival , Retrospective Studies , Creatinine , Treatment Outcome , SARS-CoV-2 , Oxygen
2.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 20(9): 805-810, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056202

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: India ranks third globally in organ procurement and transplant and has the second highest COVID-19 incidence rate, but data regarding COVID-19 vaccination in solid-organ transplant patients are scarce. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We created a cross-sectional, anonymous, online questionnaire and sentinvitations to several transplant centers in India. We surveyed vaccine mandates, immunization coverage and side effects, administration timing, infection severity among solid-organ transplant recipients, and booster dosage recommendations. RESULTS: The survey results showedthat vaccinepolicy is heterogeneous among centers; vaccination is voluntary at some centers (44.7%), but some centers have established COVID-19 vaccination as a requirement for transplant candidates (44.6%). CoviShield was the most common vaccine administered (89.3%), and more than 50% of transplant recipients and donors were fully vaccinated. Survey results showed that the pretransplant wait time after full vaccination (both doses) is 2 to 4 weeks (48.9%), and the optimal time for vaccination after transplant is 3 to 6 months (59.3%). For vaccinated transplant patients, 89.4% of respondents reported an incidence rate for posttransplant breakthrough infection of less than 25%. For unvaccinated patients, 38.3% ofrespondents reported a 25% to 50% incidence rate of posttransplant COVID- 19 infection. Booster doses are recommended at many transplant centers in India, as reported by 89.4% of survey respondents. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the survey suggested that there are no substantial safety concerns Future targets should include increasing efficacy and increasing booster doses of the COVID-19 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Transplant Recipients , Treatment Outcome , Vaccination/adverse effects
3.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 20(Suppl 4): 32-42, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2025256

ABSTRACT

Worldwide, India ranks number 2 and 3 for COVID-19 burden and absolute transplant numbers, respectively. Here, we summarized our single and multicenter Indian studies on solid-organ transplant during the COVID-19 pandemic. During the pandemic, solid-organ transplants declined 40% to 50%. The mortality rate in COVID-19-positive kidney transplant recipients (11.6%) was lower in India compared with the developed world during the first wave and lower compared with maintenance hemodialysis patients (13% to 38%) but significantly higher compared with the nonimmunosuppressed general population (1% to 3%) in India. We contributed to National Organ and Tissue Transplant Organization transplant-related guidelines to increase safety and access to solid-organ transplant. We reported the safety and feasibility of remdesivir (n = 57) and convalescent plasma therapy (n = 10) in kidney transplant recipients. We reported 100% patient and graft survival without any complications related to COVID-19 in a large cohort of kidney transplant recipients who recovered from COVID-19 (n = 372) and a large cohort of kidney transplant recipients of living donors (n = 31) who recovered from COVID-19 without any change in induction and maintenance immunosuppression. COVID-19 disease severity and mortality in the second episode (reoccurring infection) was higher (46%) compared with the first episode (11.6%). There was 4.4% incidence of COVID-19-associated mucormycosis in kidney transplant recipients with mortality of 46% in the second wave. We reported COVID-19 vaccine safety with suboptimal efficacy in kidney transplant recipients and dialysis patients compared with the general population. Our report suggested that transplant with carefully selected COVID-19-recovered donors and patients may be feasible and safe, at least over the short term. Continued research is needed on vaccine efficacy, booster doses, and long-term follow up sequelae.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Organ Transplantation , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Living Donors , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Transplant Recipients , Treatment Outcome
6.
Indian J Nephrol ; 32(3): 216-222, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903658

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis (CKD-5D) are among the worst hit by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Need to travel for dialysis, comorbidities, and immunosuppressive state put them at risk of severe disease and poor outcomes. We report our experience of COVID-19 in a cohort of CKD-5D from a public sector tertiary-care center from western India. Material and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 58 CKD-5D patients with confirmed COVID-19 admitted to our COVID-19 hospital. Suspected COVID-19, acute kidney injury (AKI), or AKI on CKD were excluded. We studied the clinical, demographic, radiological, and laboratory profiles; treatment; and outcomes of the patients. We assessed the potential clinical and laboratory parameters to predict mortality. Results: The mean age of the patients was 48.7 ± 16.9 years, with 55% males. Comorbidities included hypertension (65%), diabetes (19%), and cardiovascular disease (15.5%). The presenting features included fever (69%), respiratory distress (50%), upper respiratory symptoms (36%), and diarrhea (13%). Five (8.6%) were asymptomatic. Bilateral infiltrates on chest imaging were the commonest radiological pattern. The patients were managed with oxygenation, hydroxychloroquine, steroids, anticoagulation, remdesivir, and favipiravir. Twenty-two (37.9%) patients died, predominantly due to respiratory failure. Disease severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) above 175 mg/L at admission were the only parameters predictive of mortality. Conclusion: CKD-5D patients with COVID-19 were less likely to present with the classical syndrome of fever and respiratory distress compared with reports from the general population and had higher mortality. Only disease severity and high CRP (>175 mg/L) were predictive of mortality in our cohort.

7.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 26(5): 619-625, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884587

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The use of remdesivir is not recommended in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection unless potential advantage offset disadvantage due to limited safety data. Our objective was to assess the safety of remdesivir in patients with end-stage renal failure and evaluate the outcome of this vulnerable group. Methodology: We carried out a retrospective observational study in dialysis-dependent ESRD patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection who received a standard 5-day course of remdesivir (powder form) from June 2020 to December 2020. Oxygen requirement, hemogram, inflammatory markers, and liver function tests before and after remdesivir treatment were compared. Result: We found thirty-nine such patients with mean age of patients 58.79 ± 12.13 years. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiac diseases were present in 58.97, 87.17, and 23.07% of patients, respectively. Mean oxygen saturation on admission was 85.41% (±7.73). There were no events of hepatotoxicity, altered behavior, or infusion reaction. There was statistically significant improvement in total leukocyte count, absolute lymphocyte counts, and C-reactive protein (p value <0.001, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively) post remdesivir treatment. A total of 60% of patients had improved oxygenation while 13% of patients had no change in oxygen requirement after completion of remdesivir course. Mortality in our study was 28.21%. We did not find any significant benefit of early remdesivir administration (3-6 days of illness) on mortality or days of hospitalization. Conclusion: The use of remdesivir in end-stage kidney disease is safe. Improvement in oxygenation was significant when baseline oxygen requirement was less. It requires prospective controlled trials with larger population to assess its impact on mortality. How to cite this article: Shah MK, Parikh M, Prajapati D, Kute VB, Bhende P, Prajapati A, et al. Safety and Tolerability of Remdesivir in Patients with End-stage Renal Disease on Maintenance Hemodialysis. Indian J Crit Care Med 2022;26(5):619-625.

8.
EClinicalMedicine ; 46: 101359, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1828410

ABSTRACT

Background: There is an enormous knowledge gap on management strategies, clinical outcomes, and follow-up after kidney transplantation (KT) in recipients that have recovered from coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Methods: We conducted a multi-center, retrospective analysis in 23 Indian transplant centres between June 26, 2020 to December 1, 2021 on KT recipients who recovered after COVID-19 infections. We analyzed clinical and biopsy-confirmed acute rejection (AR) incidence and used cox-proportional modeling to estimate multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for predictors of AR. We also performed competing risk analysis. Additional outcome measures included graft loss, all-cause mortality, waiting time from a positive real-time polymerase test (RT-PCR) to KT, laboratory parameters, and quality of life in follow-up. Findings: Among 372 KT which included 38(10·21%) ABO-incompatible, 12(3·22%) sensitized, 64(17·20%) coexisting donors with COVID-19 history and 20 (5·37%) recipients with residual radiographic abnormalities, the incidence of AR was 34 (9·1%) with 1(0·26%) death censored graft loss, and 4(1·07%) all-cause mortality over a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 241 (106-350) days. In our cox hazard proportional analysis, absence of oxygen requirement during COVID-19 compared to oxygen need [HR = 0·14(0·03-0·59); p-value = 0·0071], and use of thymoglobulin use compared to other induction strategies [HR = 0·17(0·03-0.95); p-value = 0·044] had a lower risk for AR. Degree of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR mismatch had the highest risk of AR [HR = 10.2(1·74-65·83); p-value = 0·011]. With competing risk analysis, with death as a competing event, HLA DR mismatch, and oxygen requirement continued to be associated with AR. Age, gender, obesity, inflammatory markers, dialysis vintage, steroid use, sensitization and ABO-incompatibility have not been associated with a higher risk of AR. The median duration between COVID-19 real time polymerase test negativity to transplant was 88(40-145) days (overall), and ranged from 88(40-137), 65(42-120), 110(49-190), and 127(64-161) days in World Health Organization ordinal scale ≤ 3, 4, 5, and 6-7, respectively. There was no difference in quality of life, tacrolimus levels, blood counts, and mean serum creatinine assessed in patients with a past COVID-19 infection independent of severity. Interpretation: Our findings support that the outcomes of KT after COVID-19 recovery are excellent with absence of COVID-19 sequelae during follow-up. Additionally, there does not seem to be a need for changes in the induction/immunosuppression regimen based on the severity of COVID-19. Funding: Sanofi.

9.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 20(Suppl 1): 10-16, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780228

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has engulfed the whole world, and India has been the second worst-hit nation. Organ transplant services were halted in both the public and private care sectors of India, with public care sectors more adversely affected. Deceased donations were disproportionately more affected, with unfavorable rates at the peak of the pandemic. Mortality outcomes of COVID-19 among different organ transplant recipients in India have been lower compared with the Western world, with younger age and less comorbidities among Indian populations partly responsible for the lower mortality. Mortality and graft loss were mostly associated with older age and those with chronic graft dysfunction. During the pandemic, invasive fungal infections, like mucormycosis, have been reported, illustrating the need for multidisciplinary management. The Indian transplant societies have formulated and timely revised guidelines for transplantation in the COVID-19 era. Living donor transplants (both liver and kidney) after recovery from COVID-19 were both first described in India, providing a guiding tool for the world. Follow-up reports of recovered solid-organ transplant recipients have also been reported in Indian studies, showing reassuring long-term outcomes. Data of breakthrough COVID-19 cases after vaccination among both transplant recipients and waitlist candidates and research in vaccine efficacy for solid-organ transplant recipients is still underway. We suggest continuing and intensifying research activities for a better plan and strategy in case of a future pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
10.
Transplant Proc ; 54(6): 1412-1416, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764010

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has drastically affected transplant services, but there is limited understanding of the discrepancy of COVID-19 effects on various regions of the world. METHODS: We have explored the Global Observatory for Organ Donation and Transplantation data for assessing the transplant number changes between the calendar year 2019 (n = 157,301) and 2020 (129,681). RESULTS: There was a disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on different areas of the world. Globally, there was a decline of 17.5%, in which deceased donation, kidney (20.9%), pancreas (16.2%), lung (12.7%), liver (11.3%), and heart (8%) transplant declined disproportionally in different regions of the world. The pandemic affected almost all geographic regions and nations, but China and the United States were mostly able to recover from the initial halt of the transplant practices by the pandemic so that there was a cumulative increase in transplant numbers. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that developing nations lagged behind, whereas developed nations have been able to recover their transplantation programs during the pandemic. Further policy making and preparedness is required to safeguard the most vulnerable areas of the world to minimize the impact of any future pandemic on transplantation practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Organ Transplantation , Tissue and Organ Procurement , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Humans , Pandemics , United States
11.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 32(4): 929-938, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1715895

ABSTRACT

There is a scarcity of data regarding the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection complicating the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) course. The objective of the study was to explore the clinical profile and outcome of CMV co-infection with COVID-19. This is a single-center retrospective study of COVID-19 cases with concomitant CMV infection. A total of 18 cases were diagnosed with CMV infection during the study period May 2020 to December 2020. The median age (Interquartile range) of the study was 45 (53-38) years with predominant male sex (n = 14, 77%). The baseline donor-recipient status for CMV included D+/R+ (10, 55%), D-/R+(6, 33%), and D+/R- (2, 12%). COVID-19 severity in the study included mild (1, 7%), moderate (5, 28%), severe (8, 44%), and critical (4, 22%) cases. Criteria for hyperinflammatory state was met by 77% (n = 14) of cases. The most common therapeutic modality for COVID-19 given was remdesivir (n = 13), tocilizumab (n = 4), and convalescent plasma (n = 4). The median CMV titer at diagnosis was 1200 (1800-1000) copies/mL. The median duration of hospital stay was 12.5 (14-11). Mortality observed in the study was four (22%). The management of CMV co-infection with COVID-19 is associated with high morbidity and mortality, and we suggest screening for CMV infection in all posttransplant COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , Kidney Transplantation , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Cytomegalovirus , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1423-1432, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1704612

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is limited current knowledge on feasibility and safety of kidney transplantation in coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) survivors. METHODS: We present a retrospective cohort study of 75 kidney transplants in patients who recovered from polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed COVID-19 performed across 22 transplant centers in India from July 3, 2020, to January 31, 2021. We detail demographics, clinical manifestations, immunosuppression regimen, laboratory findings, treatment, and outcomes. Patients with a previous diagnosis of COVID-19 were accepted after documenting 2 negative severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 PCR tests, normal chest imaging with complete resolution of symptom for at least 28 d and significant social distancing for 14 d before surgery. RESULTS: Clinical severity in patients ranged from asymptomatic (n = 17, 22.7%), mild (n = 36.48%), moderate (n = 15.20%), and severe (n = 7.9.3%) disease. Median duration between PCR positive to transplant was 60 d (overall) and increased significantly from asymptomatic, mild, moderate, and severe disease (49, 57, 83, 94 d, P 0.019), respectively. All recipients and donors were asymptomatic with normal creatinine after surgery at a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 81 (56-117) d without any complications relating to surgery or COVID-19. Patient and graft survival was 100%, and acute rejection was reported in 6.6%. CONCLUSIONS: Prospective kidney transplant recipients post-COVID-19 can be considered for transplantation after comprehensive donor and recipient screening before surgery using a combination of clinical, radiologic, and laboratory criteria, careful pretransplant evaluation, and individualized risk-benefit analysis. Further large-scale prospective studies with longer follow-up will better clarify our initial findings. To date, this remains the first and the largest study of kidney transplantation in COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/surgery , Kidney Transplantation , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Donor Selection/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , India , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Selection , Retrospective Studies , Survivors , Treatment Outcome
15.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 19(12): 1263-1270, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579964

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Comparisons of COVID-19 incidence between kidney transplant recipients and patients who did not receive kidney transplant are underexplored in various geographic regions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This Indian, single-center, retrospective study analyzed COVID-19 data of patients hospitalized between May 12, 2020, and January 11, 2021. A propensity matching score was used to compare outcomes between the 2 groups. We also used multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses to assess association of kidney transplantation with mortality. RESULTS: Of the 1627 COVID-19 cases, 179 were kidney transplant recipients and 1448 were not kidney transplant patients (control group). Ofthe 436 reported in-hospital deaths, 20 (11.1%) were in the kidney transplant group and 416 (28.7%) were in the control group. Propensity matching identified 98 kidney transplantrecipients and167 controlpatients. InKaplanMeier survival plots for these patients, there was no statistical difference in mortality (log-rank, Mantel Cox test; P = .07) or severity (log-rank, Mantel Cox test; P = .07) with regard to COVID-19. In Cox analysis, age groups from 61 to 70 years (hazard ratio = 1.5; 95% CI, 1.0-2.2; P = .04), 71 to 80 years (hazard ratio = 1.64; 95% CI, 1.0-2.5; P = .02), and >80 years (hazard ratio = 1.91; 95% CI, 1.1-3.1; P = .01)were associatedwith statistically significant greater mortality.Having a kidney transplant (hazard ratio = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.3-0.7; P = 0.001) was not associated with mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In our analysis, age was the most important predictor of mortality. Kidney transplant status was not found to have an independent association with mortality and severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Incidence , India/epidemiology , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Multivariate Analysis , Proportional Hazards Models , Retrospective Studies , Transplant Recipients , Treatment Outcome
16.
Transplant Direct ; 8(1): e1255, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575040

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19-associated mucormycosis (CAM) is a recently emerging entity. There is a lack of reports of CAM in organ transplant recipients. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter (n = 18) retrospective research in India during November 2020 to July 2021. The purpose of this study was to explore the clinical spectrum, outcome and risk factors for mortality of CAM in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). RESULTS: The incidence of CAM was 4.4% (61/1382 COVID-19-positive KTRs) with 26.2% mortality. The median age of the cohort was 45 (38-54) y. Twenty (32%) were not hospitalized and 14 (22.9%) were on room air during COVID-19. The proportion of postdischarge CAM was 59.1%, while concurrent CAM was reported in 40.9%. The presentation of CAM was 91.8% rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis and 8.2% pulmonary with 19.6% and 100% mortality, respectively. In the univariable analysis, older age, obesity, difficulty of breathing, high-flow oxygen requirement, and delay in starting therapy were significantly associated with mortality. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients requiring high-flow oxygen therapy [odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 9.3 (1.6-51); P = 0.01] and obesity [odds ratio (95% confidence interval) = 5.2 (1-28); P = 0.05] was associated with mortality. The median follow-up of the study was 60 (35-60) d. CONCLUSIONS: We describe the largest case series of CAM in KTRs. Morality in pulmonary CAM is extremely high. Severe COVID-19 pose extra risk for the development of CAM and associated mortality. Our report will help in better understanding the conundrum and management of CAM.

17.
Int Urol Nephrol ; 54(7): 1693-1703, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520430

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) sequelae in the transplant population are scarcely reported. Post-COVID-19 mucormycosis is one of such sequelae, which is a dreadful and rare entity. The purpose of this report was to study the full spectrum of this dual infection in kidney transplant recipients (KTR). METHODS: We did a comprehensive analysis of 11 mucormycosis cases in KTR who recovered from COVID-19 in IKDRC, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India during the study period from Nov 2020 to May 2021. We also looked for the risk factors for mucormycosis with a historical cohort of 157 KTR who did not develop mucormycosis. RESULTS: The median age (interquartile range, range) of the cohort was 42 (33.5-50, 26-60) years with 54.5% diabetes. COVID-19 severity ranged from mild (n = 10) to severe cases (n = 1). The duration from COVID-19 recovery to presentation was 7 (7-7, 4-14) days. Ten cases were Rhino-orbital-cerebral-mucormycosis (ROCM) and one had pulmonary mucormycosis. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was performed in all cases of ROCM. The duration of antifungal therapy was 28 (24-30, 21-62) days. The mortality rate reported was 27%. The risk factors for post-transplant mucormycosis were diabetes (18% vs 54.5%; p-value = 0.01), lymphopenia [12 (10-18) vs 20 (12-26) %; p-value = 0.15] and a higher neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio [7 (4.6-8.3) vs 3.85 (3.3-5.8); p-value = 0.5]. CONCLUSION: The morbidity and mortality with post-COVID-19 mucormycosis are high. Post-transplant patients with diabetes are more prone to this dual infection. Preparedness and early identification is the key to improve the outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Kidney Transplantation , Mucormycosis , Adult , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Disease Progression , Humans , India/epidemiology , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Mucormycosis/epidemiology , Mucormycosis/etiology , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
18.
Transplant Proc ; 2021 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510363

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with adverse outcomes in transplantation communities. Mucormycosis, although a rare infection, has been classically linked to organ transplantation and is associated with exceptionally high morbidity and mortality rates. In this pandemic era, the double infection of mucormycosis and COVID-19 is a lethal combination but is rarely described in the literature on organ transplantation. CASE PRESENTATION: This article presents the case of a young kidney transplant recipient with diabetes who acquired severe COVID-19, followed by disseminated mucormycosis. The patient was a health care worker who developed severe COVID-19, for which he received remdesivir, anticoagulation, and dexamethasone. No immunomodulatory therapy was used. His maximum oxygen support was bilevel positive airway pressure ventilation. His sugar levels were frequently deranged during the stay. He developed secondary sepsis with Klebsiella, followed by nonhealing lung consolidation. He later developed pleural effusion and splenic abscess, which was detected incidentally. He underwent an emergency splenectomy, the culture of which yielded mucormycosis. Liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg was administered. The patient deteriorated, and a repeat laparotomy yielded gastric perforation, with pus culture showing mucormycosis. The patient died after a long hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: The diagnosis and management of this dual infection during the pandemic is extremely challenging. In this case, the unusual location of mucormycosis complicating COVID-19 calls for a meticulous approach to opportunistic fungal infections in organ transplant recipients who are positive for COVID-19, especially in those patients with diabetes.

19.
Curr Transplant Rep ; 8(4): 281-292, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491485

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: As the prevalence of individuals with recovered coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) increases, determining if and when organs from these donors can be safely used is an important priority. We examined current knowledge of outcomes of transplant using donors with recovered COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: A literature search of PubMed and Google scholar databases was conducted to identify articles with terms "SARS-CoV2," "COVID-19," "donor recovered," and "transplantation" published through 08/10/2021. We identified 25 reports detailing 94 recipients of both abdominal and thoracic transplants from donors with both prior and active COVID-19 infection. Rates of transmission to the recipient and of transplanted organ dysfunction were low among reports of donors with prior COVID-19 infection. End organ dysfunction and transmission were more common with active infection, although few reports are available. Standardized reporting is needed to better assess the impact of donor symptomatology, cycle thresholds, and individual recipient risk factors on postoperative outcomes. SUMMARY: Available reports suggest that transplantation from COVID-19 donors may be feasible and safe, at least in short term follow-up. Nevertheless, there is a need for standardized testing and management protocols which should be tailored for available resources. While increased availability of COVID-19 vaccinations will mitigate risks of donor-derived COVID-19 and simplify management, continued vigilance is warranted during the ongoing public health emergency.

20.
Transplant Proc ; 2021 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487993

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effect of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on a developing nation is sparsely reported and, more importantly, the discrepancies in public and private sectors are underexplored. METHODS: We retrospectively investigated the data on the effect of COVID-19 on renal transplantation between 2019 and 2020 in a nationwide analysis from 8 public and 10 private sector hospitals of India. RESULTS: On comparing the yearly data, the number of living-related transplants and deceased donor transplants declined by 48% (2610 vs 1370) and 49% (194 vs 99), respectively. The outpatient numbers and in-center admissions decreased by 40.4% (616,741 vs 367,962) and 30.8 % (73,190 vs 49,918). respectively. There was no increase in the number of renal or graft biopsies in the COVID-19 era. The number of waitlisted patients on hemodialysis was higher in public (304,898 vs 338,343) when compared with private (163,096 vs 150,292) in the last 2 years. Similarly, the number of waitlisted patients on peritoneal dialysis (4655 vs 3526) was higher in the public sector compared with private sector (932 vs 745). The decline in living transplants during the pandemic was higher in public sectors (58%) compared with the private (49%). However, the decline in deceased donation was higher in private (57.9%) relative to public (50.6%). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has adversely affected the transplantation activities across the Indian transplantation centers, with a disproportionately higher impact on waitlisted patients in public sector programs. A sound prioritization of health care resources is mandated to safeguard the most deprived and high-risk waitlisted patients during the pandemic.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL