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1.
NPJ Digit Med ; 5(1): 153, 2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062278

ABSTRACT

The importance of infection risk prediction as a key public health measure has only been underscored by the COVID-19 pandemic. In a recent study, researchers use machine learning to develop an algorithm that predicts the risk of COVID-19 infection, by combining biometric data from wearable devices like Fitbit, with electronic symptom surveys. In doing so, they aim to increase the efficiency of test allocation when tracking disease spread in resource-limited settings. But the implications of technology that applies data from wearables stretch far beyond infection monitoring into healthcare delivery and research. The adoption and implementation of this type of technology will depend on regulation, impact on patient outcomes, and cost savings.

3.
JAMIA open ; 4(4), 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1679121

ABSTRACT

Patient-generated health data (PGHD) have not achieved widespread clinical adoption. However, the COVID-induced shift to telemedicine may have created opportunities for PGHD as surrogates for vital signs collected in person. We assessed whether this shift was associated with greater ambulatory care PGHD use. We conducted an interrupted time series analysis of physician enrollment in, and patient-initiated vital sign transmission of non-COVID-associated PGHD through, a national PGHD platform (Validic). Ten health systems, 4695 physicians, and 51 320 patients were included. We found a significant increase in physician enrollment (slope change of 0.86/week, P = .02). Platform application programming interface calls continued their pre-COVID upward trend, despite large reductions in overall encounters. These findings suggest significantly greater pandemic-associated clinical demand for PGHD, and patient supply disproportionate to encounter rates. Increasing clinical use and ongoing efforts to reduce barriers, could help seize current adoption momentum to realize PGHD’s potential value. Lay Summary Patient-generated health data (PGHD)—health-related data created and recorded by or from patients outside of the clinical setting to help address a health concern—have not yet achieved widespread adoption in routine clinical care. The COVID-19 pandemic precipitated a rapid transition of outpatient encounters to telemedicine in which healthcare providers lacked access to vital signs routinely collected during in-person visits. We conducted an analysis to determine whether the transition to telemedicine increased patient transmission of, and provider adoption of vital sign-related PGHD as surrogates for their in-person equivalents. We found that the number of healthcare providers enrolling on a national PGHD platform increased significantly following the transition to telemedicine, and that the amount of PGHD transmission continued the upward trajectory that it was already experiencing, substantially outpacing the dramatic decline in overall encounters that occurred early in the pandemic. While adoption challenges persist, including questions about accuracy of PGHD, liability, reimbursement, and the potential for exacerbating disparities, these findings suggest an increasing willingness of patients and healthcare providers to use vital sign-related PGHD to supplement telemedicine encounters. Increasing clinical use and ongoing efforts to reduce barriers, could help seize current adoption momentum to realize PGHD’s potential value.

4.
JAMIA Open ; 4(4): ooab097, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1584260

ABSTRACT

Patient-generated health data (PGHD) have not achieved widespread clinical adoption. However, the COVID-induced shift to telemedicine may have created opportunities for PGHD as surrogates for vital signs collected in person. We assessed whether this shift was associated with greater ambulatory care PGHD use. We conducted an interrupted time series analysis of physician enrollment in, and patient-initiated vital sign transmission of non-COVID-associated PGHD through, a national PGHD platform (Validic). Ten health systems, 4695 physicians, and 51 320 patients were included. We found a significant increase in physician enrollment (slope change of 0.86/week, P = .02). Platform application programming interface calls continued their pre-COVID upward trend, despite large reductions in overall encounters. These findings suggest significantly greater pandemic-associated clinical demand for PGHD, and patient supply disproportionate to encounter rates. Increasing clinical use and ongoing efforts to reduce barriers, could help seize current adoption momentum to realize PGHD's potential value.

5.
Neuro Oncol ; 23(8): 1252-1260, 2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1169684

ABSTRACT

On July 24, 2020, a workshop sponsored by the National Brain Tumor Society was held on innovating brain tumor clinical trials based on lessons learned from the COVID-19 experience. Various stakeholders from the brain tumor community participated including the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), academic and community clinicians, researchers, industry, clinical research organizations, patients and patient advocates, and representatives from the Society for Neuro-Oncology and the National Cancer Institute. This report summarizes the workshop and proposes ways to incorporate lessons learned from COVID-19 to brain tumor clinical trials including the increased use of telemedicine and decentralized trial models as opportunities for practical innovation with potential long-term impact on clinical trial design and implementation.


Subject(s)
Brain Neoplasms , COVID-19 , Brain Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , National Cancer Institute (U.S.) , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , United States Food and Drug Administration
6.
NPJ Digit Med ; 3: 108, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738895
7.
Telemed J E Health ; 26(11): 1310-1313, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-719187

ABSTRACT

This article reviews the current experience and the flaws encountered in the rush to deploy telemedicine as a substitute for in-person care in response to the raging coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic; the preceding fault lines in the U.S. health care system that exacerbated the problem; and the importance of emerging from this calamity with a clear vision for necessary health care reforms. It starts with the premise that the precursors of catastrophes of this magnitude provide a valid basis for planning corrective measures, improved preparedness, and ultimately serious health reform. Such reform should include standardized protocols for proper deployment of telemedicine to triage patients to the appropriate level and source of care at the point of need, proper use of relevant technological innovations to deliver precision medicine, and the development of regional networks to coordinate and improve access to care while streamlining the care process. The other essential element is a universal payment system that puts the United States at par with the rest of the industrialized countries, regardless of variation among them. The ultimate goal is creating an efficient, effective, accessible, and equitable system of care. Although timing is uncertain, the pandemic will be brought under control. The path to a better future after the pandemic offers some consolation for the massive loss of life and treasure during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage/organization & administration , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Humans , Insurance, Health, Reimbursement/standards , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/standards , Triage/standards , United States/epidemiology
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