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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470852

ABSTRACT

Vulnerable populations may be more vulnerable to mental health problems posed by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A systematic review was performed to compare the mental health impact of COVID-19 between vulnerable and non-vulnerable groups. Five electronic databases were searched for observational studies reporting the psychological outcomes of both vulnerable populations and healthy controls during the COVID-19 era. The primary outcomes are the severity of depression and anxiety, and secondary outcomes include other aspects of mental health such as stress or sleep disturbance. Meta-analysis was performed for the severity of mental health symptoms, and the results were presented as standardized mean difference and 95% confidence intervals. A total of 25 studies were included. According to the findings, the elderly generally experienced significantly lower levels of psychological symptoms including depression, anxiety, and perceived stress. Pregnant women, patients with chronic diseases, and patients with pre-existing severe mental disorders showed mixed results according to each mental health outcome. The results indicate that vulnerable groups have been affected differently in the COVID-19 era. Though the insufficient number and heterogeneity of included studies leave the results inconclusive, our findings may contribute to identifying priorities of mental health needs among various vulnerable populations and allocating health resources with efficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Aged , Anxiety , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463637

ABSTRACT

Nurses are vulnerable to mental health challenges, including burnout, as they are exposed to adverse job conditions such as high workload. The mental health of this population can relate not only to individual well-being but also to patient safety outcomes. Therefore, there is a need for a mental health improvement strategy that targets this population. This cross-sectional survey study investigates emotional labor, burnout, turnover intention, and medical error levels among 117 nursing staff members in a South Korean university hospital; it also analyzes correlations among outcomes and conduct correlation analysis and multiple regression analysis to determine relationships among these factors. The participants had moderate to high levels of emotional labor and burnout, and 23% had experienced medical errors within the last six months. Save for medical errors, all outcomes significantly and positively correlated with each other. These results can be used to improve the mental health outcomes of nurses working in the hospital and their consequences. Specifically, the job positions of nursing personnel may be a major consideration in such a strategy, and job-focused emotional labor and employee-focused emotional labor may be promising targets in ameliorating turnover intention and client-related burnout, respectively.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Medical Errors , Republic of Korea , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
3.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 9(10)2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444173

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has become an unprecedented threat to humanity worldwide, including healthcare workers (HCWs). Mind-body modalities have been used to improve the mental health, well-being, quality of life, and physical health of clinical and general populations, and may also be used to improve the mental health of HCWs during COVID-19. The objective of this review is to analyze the effectiveness of mind-body modalities for the mental health of HCWs in the COVID-19 era. Six electronic bibliographic databases were comprehensively searched to find intervention studies using mind-body modalities, including meditation, mindfulness-based intervention, autogenic training, yoga, tai chi, qigong, breathing exercise, music therapy, guided imagery, biofeedback, prayer, and faith-based techniques for HCWs. All intervention studies conducted from December 2019 to August 2021 will be included. Quality assessment will be performed according to study type, and Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool will be used for randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). If sufficient homogeneous data from RCTs exist, a meta-analysis will be performed. Dichotomous data and continuous data are presented as risk ratios and mean differences with their 95% confidence intervals, respectively. The results of this systematic review will be disseminated through the publication of a manuscript in a peer-reviewed journal or by presentation at a conference.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 08 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376832

ABSTRACT

The mental health of nurses including burnout is an important issue. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate whether mind-body modalities improve burnout and other mental health aspects of nurses. A comprehensive search was conducted using six electronic databases. Randomized controlled trials using mind-body modalities on the mental health of nurses, up to January 2021, were included. The methodological quality of the included studies was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. Seventeen studies were included in the review. Data on mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) and yoga were available for burnout, and there was no evidence that multimodal resilience programs including MBIs statistically significantly improved burnout levels compared to no intervention or active control groups. However, one study reported that yoga could significantly improve emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, which are subscales of burnout, compared to usual care. In addition, the effects of MBIs, relaxation, yoga, and music on various mental health outcomes and stress-related symptoms have been reported. In conclusion, there was some evidence that yoga was helpful for improvement in burnout of nurses. However, due to the heterogeneity of interventions and outcomes of the studies included, further high-quality clinical trials are needed on this topic in the future.


Subject(s)
Mindfulness , Nurses , Yoga , Hospitals , Humans , Mental Health
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(12)2020 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-610686

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected the world, and its deleterious effects on human domestic life, society, economics, and especially on human mental health are expected to continue. Mental health experts highlighted health issues this pandemic may cause, such as depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Mind-body intervention, such as mindfulness meditation, has accumulated sufficient empirical evidence supporting the efficacy in improving human mental health states and the use for this purpose has been increasing. Notably, some of these interventions have already been tried in the form of telemedicine or eHealth. Korea, located adjacent to China, was exposed to COVID-19 from a relatively early stage, and today it is evaluated to have been successful in controlling this disease. "The COVID-19 telemedicine center of Korean medicine" has treated more than 20% of the confirmed COVID-19 patients in Korea with telemedicine since 9 March 2020. The center used telemedicine and mind-body modalities (including mindfulness meditation) to improve the mental health of patients diagnosed with COVID-19. In this paper, the telemedicine manual is introduced to provide insights into the development of mental health interventions for COVID-19 and other large-scale disasters in the upcoming new-normal era.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mind-Body Therapies , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Telemedicine/methods , Anxiety , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2
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