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1.
Nat Chem Biol ; 2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2133477

ABSTRACT

We report the engineering and selection of two synthetic proteins-FSR16m and FSR22-for the possible treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. FSR16m and FSR22 are trimeric proteins composed of DARPin SR16m or SR22 fused with a T4 foldon. Despite selection by a spike protein from a now historical SARS-CoV-2 strain, FSR16m and FSR22 exhibit broad-spectrum neutralization of SARS-CoV-2 strains, inhibiting authentic B.1.351, B.1.617.2 and BA.1.1 viruses, with respective IC50 values of 3.4, 2.2 and 7.4 ng ml-1 for FSR16m. Cryo-EM structures revealed that these DARPins recognize a region of the receptor-binding domain (residues 456, 475, 486, 487 and 489) overlapping a critical portion of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)-binding surface. K18-hACE2 transgenic mice inoculated with B.1.617.2 and receiving intranasally administered FSR16m showed less weight loss and 10-100-fold lower viral burden in upper and lower respiratory tracts. The strong and broad neutralization potency makes FSR16m and FSR22 promising candidates for the prevention and treatment of infection by SARS-CoV-2.

2.
Ann N Y Acad Sci ; 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119201

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic antibodies have broad indications across diverse disease states, such as oncology, autoimmune diseases, and infectious diseases. New research continues to identify antibodies with therapeutic potential as well as methods to improve upon endogenous antibodies and to design antibodies de novo. On April 27-30, 2022, experts in antibody research across academia and industry met for the Keystone symposium "Antibodies as Drugs" to present the state-of-the-art in antibody therapeutics, repertoires and deep learning, bispecific antibodies, and engineering.

3.
Front Immunol ; 13: 977064, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099147

ABSTRACT

Variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have emerged continuously, challenging the effectiveness of vaccines, diagnostics, and treatments. Moreover, the possibility of the appearance of a new betacoronavirus with high transmissibility and high fatality is reason for concern. In this study, we used a natively paired yeast display technology, combined with next-generation sequencing (NGS) and massive bioinformatic analysis to perform a comprehensive study of subdomain specificity of natural human antibodies from two convalescent donors. Using this screening technology, we mapped the cross-reactive responses of antibodies generated by the two donors against SARS-CoV-2 variants and other betacoronaviruses. We tested the neutralization potency of a set of the cross-reactive antibodies generated in this study and observed that most of the antibodies produced by these patients were non-neutralizing. We performed a comparison of the specific and non-specific antibodies by somatic hypermutation in a repertoire-scale for the two individuals and observed that the degree of somatic hypermutation was unique for each patient. The data from this study provide functional insights into cross-reactive antibodies that can assist in the development of strategies against emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants and divergent betacoronaviruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Membrane Glycoproteins , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Envelope Proteins
4.
Cell Rep ; 41(5): 111528, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2060517

ABSTRACT

The emergence and global spread of the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variants, which carry an unprecedented number of mutations, raise serious concerns due to the reduced efficacy of current vaccines and resistance to therapeutic antibodies. Here, we report the generation and characterization of two potent human monoclonal antibodies, NA8 and NE12, against the receptor-binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. NA8 interacts with a highly conserved region and has a breadth of neutralization with picomolar potency against the Beta variant and the Omicron BA.1 and BA.2 sublineages and nanomolar potency against BA.2.12.1 and BA.4. Combination of NA8 and NE12 retains potent neutralizing activity against the major SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. Cryo-EM analysis provides the structural basis for the broad and complementary neutralizing activity of these two antibodies. We confirm the in vivo protective and therapeutic efficacies of NA8 and NE12 in the hamster model. These results show that broad and potent human antibodies can overcome the continuous immune escape of evolving SARS-CoV-2 variants.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Monoclonal/pharmacology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics , Neutralization Tests , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Viral Envelope Proteins , Membrane Glycoproteins/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use
5.
Cell ; 185(23): 4333-4346.e14, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041612

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 mRNA booster vaccines provide protection from severe disease, eliciting strong immunity that is further boosted by previous infection. However, it is unclear whether these immune responses are affected by the interval between infection and vaccination. Over a 2-month period, we evaluated antibody and B cell responses to a third-dose mRNA vaccine in 66 individuals with different infection histories. Uninfected and post-boost but not previously infected individuals mounted robust ancestral and variant spike-binding and neutralizing antibodies and memory B cells. Spike-specific B cell responses from recent infection (<180 days) were elevated at pre-boost but comparatively less so at 60 days post-boost compared with uninfected individuals, and these differences were linked to baseline frequencies of CD27lo B cells. Day 60 to baseline ratio of BCR signaling measured by phosphorylation of Syk was inversely correlated to days between infection and vaccination. Thus, B cell responses to booster vaccines are impeded by recent infection.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes , COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Humans , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination , B-Lymphocytes/immunology
6.
Frontiers in immunology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2033880

ABSTRACT

Variants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have emerged continuously, challenging the effectiveness of vaccines, diagnostics, and treatments. Moreover, the possibility of the appearance of a new betacoronavirus with high transmissibility and high fatality is reason for concern. In this study, we used a natively paired yeast display technology, combined with next-generation sequencing (NGS) and massive bioinformatic analysis to perform a comprehensive study of subdomain specificity of natural human antibodies from two convalescent donors. Using this screening technology, we mapped the cross-reactive responses of antibodies generated by the two donors against SARS-CoV-2 variants and other betacoronaviruses. We tested the neutralization potency of a set of the cross-reactive antibodies generated in this study and observed that most of the antibodies produced by these patients were non-neutralizing. We performed a comparison of the specific and non-specific antibodies by somatic hypermutation in a repertoire-scale for the two individuals and observed that the degree of somatic hypermutation was unique for each patient. The data from this study provide functional insights into cross-reactive antibodies that can assist in the development of strategies against emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants and divergent betacoronaviruses.

7.
Structure ; 30(9): 1233-1244.e7, 2022 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1937225

ABSTRACT

Immunization with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike elicits diverse antibodies, but it is unclear if any of the antibodies can neutralize broadly against other beta-coronaviruses. Here, we report antibody WS6 from a mouse immunized with mRNA encoding the SARS-CoV-2 spike. WS6 bound diverse beta-coronavirus spikes and neutralized SARS-CoV-2 variants, SARS-CoV, and related sarbecoviruses. Epitope mapping revealed WS6 to target a region in the S2 subunit, which was conserved among SARS-CoV-2, Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, and hCoV-OC43. The crystal structure at 2 Å resolution of WS6 revealed recognition to center on a conserved S2 helix, which was occluded in both pre- and post-fusion spike conformations. Structural and neutralization analyses indicated WS6 to neutralize by inhibiting fusion and post-viral attachment. Comparison of WS6 with other recently identified antibodies that broadly neutralize beta-coronaviruses indicated a stem-helical supersite-centered on hydrophobic residues Phe1148, Leu1152, Tyr1155, and Phe1156-to be a promising target for vaccine design.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Mice , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry
8.
PLoS One ; 17(5): e0268767, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862275

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, widespread infections have allowed SARS-CoV-2 to evolve in human, leading to the emergence of multiple circulating variants. Some of these variants show increased resistance to vaccine-elicited immunity, convalescent plasma, or monoclonal antibodies. In particular, mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 spike have drawn attention. To facilitate the isolation of neutralizing antibodies and the monitoring of vaccine effectiveness against these variants, we designed and produced biotin-labeled molecular probes of variant SARS-CoV-2 spikes and their subdomains, using a structure-based construct design that incorporated an N-terminal purification tag, a specific amino acid sequence for protease cleavage, the variant spike-based region of interest, and a C-terminal sequence targeted by biotin ligase. These probes could be produced by a single step using in-process biotinylation and purification. We characterized the physical properties and antigenicity of these probes, comprising the N-terminal domain (NTD), the receptor-binding domain (RBD), the RBD and subdomain 1 (RBD-SD1), and the prefusion-stabilized spike ectodomain (S2P) with sequences from SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern or of interest, including variants Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Epsilon, Iota, Kappa, Delta, Lambda, Mu, and Omicron. We functionally validated probes by using yeast expressing a panel of nine SARS-CoV-2 spike-binding antibodies and confirmed sorting capabilities of variant probes using yeast displaying libraries of plasma antibodies from COVID-19 convalescent donors. We deposited these constructs to Addgene to enable their dissemination. Overall, this study describes a matrix of SARS-CoV-2 variant molecular probes that allow for assessment of immune responses, identification of serum antibody specificity, and isolation and characterization of neutralizing antibodies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Biotin , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Molecular Probes , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
9.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(646): eabn6859, 2022 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794534

ABSTRACT

The devastation caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has made clear the importance of pandemic preparedness. To address future zoonotic outbreaks due to related viruses in the sarbecovirus subgenus, we identified a human monoclonal antibody, 10-40, that neutralized or bound all sarbecoviruses tested in vitro and protected against SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV in vivo. Comparative studies with other receptor-binding domain (RBD)-directed antibodies showed 10-40 to have the greatest breadth against sarbecoviruses, suggesting that 10-40 is a promising agent for pandemic preparedness. Moreover, structural analyses on 10-40 and similar antibodies not only defined an epitope cluster in the inner face of the RBD that is well conserved among sarbecoviruses but also uncovered a distinct antibody class with a common CDRH3 motif. Our analyses also suggested that elicitation of this class of antibodies may not be overly difficult, an observation that bodes well for the development of a pan-sarbecovirus vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Immunoglobulin Isotypes , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
10.
Science ; 376(6591): eabn8897, 2022 04 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759268

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant and its resistance to neutralization by vaccinee and convalescent sera are driving a search for monoclonal antibodies with potent neutralization. To provide insight into effective neutralization, we determined cryo-electron microscopy structures and evaluated receptor binding domain (RBD) antibodies for their ability to bind and neutralize B.1.1.529. Mutations altered 16% of the B.1.1.529 RBD surface, clustered on an RBD ridge overlapping the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)-binding surface and reduced binding of most antibodies. Substantial inhibitory activity was retained by select monoclonal antibodies-including A23-58.1, B1-182.1, COV2-2196, S2E12, A19-46.1, S309, and LY-CoV1404-that accommodated these changes and neutralized B.1.1.529. We identified combinations of antibodies with synergistic neutralization. The analysis revealed structural mechanisms for maintenance of potent neutralization against emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/therapy , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
11.
mBio ; : e0322721, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685493

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern (VOCs) harbor mutations in the spike (S) glycoprotein that confer more efficient transmission and dampen the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines and antibody therapies. S mediates virus entry and is the primary target for antibody responses, with structural studies of soluble S variants revealing an increased propensity toward conformations accessible to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (hACE2) receptor. However, real-time observations of conformational dynamics that govern the structural equilibriums of the S variants have been lacking. Here, we report single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) studies of critical mutations observed in VOCs, including D614G and E484K, in the context of virus particles. Investigated variants predominately occupied more open hACE2-accessible conformations, agreeing with previous structures of soluble trimers. Additionally, these S variants exhibited slower transitions in hACE2-accessible/bound states. Our finding of increased S kinetic stability in the open conformation provides a new perspective on SARS-CoV-2 adaptation to the human population. IMPORTANCE SARS-CoV-2 surface S glycoprotein-the target of antibodies and vaccines-is responsible for binding to the cellular receptor hACE2. The interactions between S and hACE2 trigger structural rearrangements of S from closed to open conformations prerequisite for virus entry. Under the selection pressure imposed by adaptation to the human host and increasing vaccinations and convalescent patients, SARS-CoV-2 is evolving and has adopted numerous mutations on S variants. These promote virus spreading and immune evasion, partially by increasing the propensity of S to adopt receptor-binding competent open conformations. Here, we determined a time dimension, using smFRET to delineate the temporal prevalence of distinct structures of S in the context of virus particles. We present the first experimental evidence of decelerated transition dynamics from the open state, revealing increased stability of S open conformations to be part of the SARS-CoV-2 adaption strategies.

12.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 11(1): 147-157, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537457

ABSTRACT

The repeated emergence of highly pathogenic human coronaviruses as well as their evolving variants highlight the need to develop potent and broad-spectrum antiviral therapeutics and vaccines. By screening monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) isolated from COVID-19-convalescent patients, we found one mAb, 2-36, with cross-neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV. We solved the cryo-EM structure of 2-36 in complex with SARS-CoV-2 or SARS-CoV spike, revealing a highly conserved epitope in the receptor-binding domain (RBD). Antibody 2-36 neutralized not only all current circulating SARS-CoV-2 variants and SARS-COV, but also a panel of bat and pangolin sarbecoviruses that can use human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as a receptor. We selected 2-36-escape viruses in vitro and confirmed that K378 T in SARS-CoV-2 RBD led to viral resistance. Taken together, 2-36 represents a strategic reserve drug candidate for the prevention and treatment of possible diseases caused by pre-emergent SARS-related coronaviruses. Its epitope defines a promising target for the development of a pan-sarbecovirus vaccine.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Epitopes/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Vero Cells
13.
[Unspecified Source]; 2020.
Non-conventional in English | [Unspecified Source] | ID: grc-750489

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has emerged as a global pathogen, sparking urgent vaccine development efforts with the trimeric spike. However, the inability of antibodies like CR3022, which binds a cryptic spike epitope with nanomolar affinity, to neutralize virus, suggests a spike-based means of neutralization escape. Here, we show the SARS-CoV-2 spike to have 10% the unfolding enthalpy of a globular protein at physiological pH, where it is recognized by antibodies like CR3022, and up to 10-times more unfolding enthalpy at endosomal pH, where it sheds such antibodies, suggesting that the spike evades potentially neutralizing antibody through a pH-dependent mechanism of conformational masking. To understand the compatibility of this mechanism with ACE2-receptor interactions, we carried out binding measurements and determined cryo-EM structures of the spike recognizing up to three ACE2 molecules at both physiological and endosomal pH. In the absence of ACE2, cryo-EM analyses indicated lower pH to reduce conformational heterogeneity. Single-receptor binding domain (RBD)-up conformations dominated at pH 5.5, resolving into a locked all-down conformation at lower pH through lowering of RBD and refolding of a pH-dependent switch. Notably, the emerging Asp614Gly strain partially destabilizes the switch that locks RBD down, thereby enhancing functional interactions with ACE2 while reducing evasion by conformational masking.

14.
Nat Immunol ; 22(12): 1503-1514, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493136

ABSTRACT

Prevention of viral escape and increased coverage against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern require therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting multiple sites of vulnerability on the coronavirus spike glycoprotein. Here we identify several potent neutralizing antibodies directed against either the N-terminal domain (NTD) or the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein. Administered in combinations, these mAbs provided low-dose protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection in the K18-human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 mouse model, using both neutralization and Fc effector antibody functions. The RBD mAb WRAIR-2125, which targets residue F486 through a unique heavy-chain and light-chain pairing, demonstrated potent neutralizing activity against all major SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. In combination with NTD and other RBD mAbs, WRAIR-2125 also prevented viral escape. These data demonstrate that NTD/RBD mAb combinations confer potent protection, likely leveraging complementary mechanisms of viral inactivation and clearance.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , Epitopes/metabolism , Humans , Mice, Transgenic , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Analysis
15.
Cell Rep ; 37(5): 109928, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1466096

ABSTRACT

Antibodies that potently neutralize SARS-CoV-2 target mainly the receptor-binding domain or the N-terminal domain (NTD). Over a dozen potently neutralizing NTD-directed antibodies have been studied structurally, and all target a single antigenic supersite in NTD (site 1). Here, we report the cryo-EM structure of a potent NTD-directed neutralizing antibody 5-7, which recognizes a site distinct from other potently neutralizing antibodies, inserting a binding loop into an exposed hydrophobic pocket between the two sheets of the NTD ß sandwich. Interestingly, this pocket was previously identified as the binding site for hydrophobic molecules, including heme metabolites, but we observe that their presence does not substantially impede 5-7 recognition. Mirroring its distinctive binding, antibody 5-7 retains neutralization potency with many variants of concern (VOCs). Overall, we reveal that a hydrophobic pocket in NTD proposed for immune evasion can be used by the immune system for recognition.

16.
Cell Rep ; 37(1): 109771, 2021 10 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439919

ABSTRACT

Understanding mechanisms of protective antibody recognition can inform vaccine and therapeutic strategies against SARS-CoV-2. We report a monoclonal antibody, 910-30, targeting the SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding site for ACE2 as a member of a public antibody response encoded by IGHV3-53/IGHV3-66 genes. Sequence and structural analyses of 910-30 and related antibodies explore how class recognition features correlate with SARS-CoV-2 neutralization. Cryo-EM structures of 910-30 bound to the SARS-CoV-2 spike trimer reveal binding interactions and its ability to disassemble spike. Despite heavy-chain sequence similarity, biophysical analyses of IGHV3-53/3-66-encoded antibodies highlight the importance of native heavy:light pairings for ACE2-binding competition and SARS-CoV-2 neutralization. We develop paired heavy:light class sequence signatures and determine antibody precursor prevalence to be ∼1 in 44,000 human B cells, consistent with public antibody identification in several convalescent COVID-19 patients. These class signatures reveal genetic, structural, and functional immune features that are helpful in accelerating antibody-based medical interventions for SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/chemistry , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Aged , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/genetics , Antibodies, Monoclonal/ultrastructure , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Binding Sites , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cryoelectron Microscopy , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/chemistry , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/genetics , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/immunology , Immunoglobulin Heavy Chains/ultrastructure , Immunoglobulin Light Chains/chemistry , Immunoglobulin Light Chains/genetics , Immunoglobulin Light Chains/immunology , Immunoglobulin Light Chains/ultrastructure , Male , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Vero Cells
17.
AIChE J ; 67(12): e17440, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427045

ABSTRACT

Antiviral monoclonal antibody (mAb) discovery enables the development of antibody-based antiviral therapeutics. Traditional antiviral mAb discovery relies on affinity between antibody and a viral antigen to discover potent neutralizing antibodies, but these approaches are inefficient because many high affinity mAbs have no neutralizing activity. We sought to determine whether screening for anti-SARS-CoV-2 mAbs at reduced pH could provide more efficient neutralizing antibody discovery. We mined the antibody response of a convalescent COVID-19 patient at both physiological pH (7.4) and reduced pH (4.5), revealing that SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies were preferentially enriched in pH 4.5 yeast display sorts. Structural analysis revealed that a potent new antibody called LP5 targets the SARS-CoV-2 N-terminal domain supersite via a unique binding recognition mode. Our data combine with evidence from prior studies to support antibody screening at pH 4.5 to accelerate antiviral neutralizing antibody discovery.

18.
Cell Host Microbe ; 28(6): 867-879.e5, 2020 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385264

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 spike employs mobile receptor-binding domains (RBDs) to engage the human ACE2 receptor and to facilitate virus entry, which can occur through low-pH-endosomal pathways. To understand how ACE2 binding and low pH affect spike conformation, we determined cryo-electron microscopy structures-at serological and endosomal pH-delineating spike recognition of up to three ACE2 molecules. RBDs freely adopted "up" conformations required for ACE2 interaction, primarily through RBD movement combined with smaller alterations in neighboring domains. In the absence of ACE2, single-RBD-up conformations dominated at pH 5.5, resolving into a solitary all-down conformation at lower pH. Notably, a pH-dependent refolding region (residues 824-858) at the spike-interdomain interface displayed dramatic structural rearrangements and mediated RBD positioning through coordinated movements of the entire trimer apex. These structures provide a foundation for understanding prefusion-spike mechanics governing endosomal entry; we suggest that the low pH all-down conformation potentially facilitates immune evasion from RBD-up binding antibody.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Pandemics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure , Amino Acid Sequence/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/ultrastructure , Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Endosomes/ultrastructure , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Receptors, Virus/genetics , Receptors, Virus/ultrastructure , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
19.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 18149, 2020 10 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387454

ABSTRACT

Antigens displayed on self-assembling nanoparticles can stimulate strong immune responses and have been playing an increasingly prominent role in structure-based vaccines. However, the development of such immunogens is often complicated by inefficiencies in their production. To alleviate this issue, we developed a plug-and-play platform using the spontaneous isopeptide-bond formation of the SpyTag:SpyCatcher system to display trimeric antigens on self-assembling nanoparticles, including the 60-subunit Aquifex aeolicus lumazine synthase (LuS) and the 24-subunit Helicobacter pylori ferritin. LuS and ferritin coupled to SpyTag expressed well in a mammalian expression system when an N-linked glycan was added to the nanoparticle surface. The respiratory syncytial virus fusion (F) glycoprotein trimer-stabilized in the prefusion conformation and fused with SpyCatcher-could be efficiently conjugated to LuS-SpyTag or ferritin-SpyTag, enabling multivalent display of F trimers with prefusion antigenicity. Similarly, F-glycoprotein trimers from human parainfluenza virus-type 3 and spike-glycoprotein trimers from SARS-CoV-2 could be displayed on LuS nanoparticles with decent yield and antigenicity. Notably, murine vaccination with 0.08 µg of SARS-CoV-2 spike-LuS nanoparticle elicited similar neutralizing responses as 2.0 µg of spike, which was ~ 25-fold higher on a weight-per-weight basis. The versatile platform described here thus allows for multivalent plug-and-play presentation on self-assembling nanoparticles of trimeric viral antigens, with SARS-CoV-2 spike-LuS nanoparticles inducing particularly potent neutralizing responses.


Subject(s)
Antigens/immunology , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antigens/genetics , Antigens/metabolism , Aquifex , Bacteria/enzymology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Ferritins/genetics , Helicobacter pylori/metabolism , Humans , Mice , Multienzyme Complexes/genetics , Neutralization Tests , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Protein Multimerization , Recombinant Proteins/biosynthesis , Recombinant Proteins/chemistry , Recombinant Proteins/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Surface Properties
20.
J Biol Chem ; 297(4): 101127, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373108

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 spike is the primary target of virus-neutralizing antibodies and critical to the development of effective vaccines against COVID-19. Here, we demonstrate that the prefusion-stabilized two-proline "S2P" spike-widely employed for laboratory work and clinical studies-unfolds when stored at 4 °C, physiological pH, as observed by electron microscopy (EM) and differential scanning calorimetry, but that its trimeric, native-like conformation can be reacquired by low pH treatment. When stored for approximately 1 week, this unfolding does not significantly alter antigenic characteristics; however, longer storage diminishes antibody binding, and month-old spike elicits virtually no neutralization in mice despite inducing high ELISA-binding titers. Cryo-EM structures reveal the folded fraction of spike to decrease with aging; however, its structure remains largely similar, although with varying mobility of the receptor-binding domain. Thus, the SARS-CoV-2 spike is susceptible to unfolding, which affects immunogenicity, highlighting the need to monitor its integrity.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antigen-Antibody Reactions , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Calorimetry, Differential Scanning , Cryoelectron Microscopy , Female , Humans , Hydrogen-Ion Concentration , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C , Protein Structure, Tertiary , Protein Unfolding , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Time Factors
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