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1.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580428

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to compare the clinical severity in patients who were coinfected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and rhinovirus or monoinfected with a single one of these viruses. METHODS: The study period ranged from 1 March 2020 to 28 February 2021 (one year). SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses were identified by real-time reverse-transcription-PCR as part of the routine work at Marseille University hospitals. Bacterial and fungal infections were detected by standard methods. Clinical data were retrospectively collected from medical files. This study was approved by the ethical committee of our institute. RESULTS: A total of 6034/15,157 (40%) tested patients were positive for at least one respiratory virus. Ninety-three (4.3%) SARS-CoV-2-infected patients were coinfected with another respiratory virus, with rhinovirus being the most frequent (62/93, 67%). Patients coinfected with SARS-CoV-2 and rhinovirus were significantly more likely to report a cough than those with SARS-CoV-2 monoinfection (62% vs. 31%; p = 0.0008). In addition, they were also significantly more likely to report dyspnea than patients with rhinovirus monoinfection (45% vs. 36%; p = 0.02). They were also more likely to be transferred to an intensive care unit and to die than patients with rhinovirus monoinfection (16% vs. 5% and 7% vs. 2%, respectively) but these differences were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: A close surveillance and investigation of the co-incidence and interactions of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses is needed. The possible higher risk of increased clinical severity in SARS-CoV-2-positive patients coinfected with rhinovirus warrants further large scale studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/virology , Picornaviridae Infections/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child , Coinfection/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Picornaviridae Infections/diagnosis , Picornaviridae Infections/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Retrospective Studies , Rhinovirus , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
3.
Virus Genes ; 2021 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1536341

ABSTRACT

Great concerns have been raised about SARS-CoV-2 variants over the past six months. At the end of 2020, an increasing incidence of spike substitutions Q677H/P was described in the USA, which involved six independent lineages. We searched for changes to this amino acid in the sequence database of SARS-CoV-2 genomes obtained at the IHU Méditerranée Infection (Marseille, France) from 3634 patients sampled between February 2020 and April 2021. In seven genomes (0.2%), we found a deletion of five amino acids at spike positions 675-679 (QTQTN) including Q677, and in 76 genomes (2.3%) we found a Q677H substitution. The 83 genomes were classified in ten different Pangolin lineages. Genomes with a spike Q677 deletion were obtained from respiratory samples collected in six cases between 28 March 2020 and 12 October 2020 and in one case on 1 February 2021. The Q677H substitution was found in genomes all obtained from respiratory samples collected from 19 January 2021 and were classified in seven different lineages. Most of these genomes (41 cases) were of UK variant. Two others were classified in the B.1.160 Pangolin lineage (Marseille-4 variant) which was first detected in July 2020 in our institute but was devoid of this substitution until 19 January 2021. Also, eight genomes were classified in the A.27/Marseille-501 lineage which was first detected in our institute in January 2021 and which either harboured or did not harbour the Q677H substitution. Thus, the spike Q677H substitution should be considered as another example of convergent evolution, as it is the case of spike substitutions L18F, E484K, L452R, and N501Y which also independently appeared in various lineages.

4.
Rev Cardiovasc Med ; 22(3): 1063-1072, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439023

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the age-specific mortality of unselected adult outpatients infected with SARS-CoV-2 treated early in a dedicated COVID-19 day hospital and we assessed whether the use of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) + azithromycin (AZ) was associated with improved survival in this cohort. A retrospective monocentric cohort study was conducted in the day hospital of our center from March to December 2020 in adults with PCR-proven infection who were treated as outpatients with a standardized protocol. The primary endpoint was 6-week mortality, and secondary endpoints were transfer to the intensive care unit and hospitalization rate. Among 10,429 patients (median age, 45 [IQR 32-57] years; 5597 [53.7%] women), 16 died (0.15%). The infection fatality rate was 0.06% among the 8315 patients treated with HCQ+AZ. No deaths occurred among the 8414 patients younger than 60 years. Older age and male sex were associated with a higher risk of death, ICU transfer, and hospitalization. Treatment with HCQ+AZ (0.17 [0.06-0.48]) was associated with a lower risk of death, independently of age, sex and epidemic period. Meta-analysis evidenced consistency with 4 previous outpatient studies (32,124 patients-Odds ratio 0.31 [0.20-0.47], I2 = 0%). Early ambulatory treatment of COVID-19 with HCQ+AZ as a standard of care is associated with very low mortality, and HCQ+AZ improve COVID-19 survival compared to other regimens.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Azithromycin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Early Medical Intervention , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Azithromycin/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , France , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
5.
Sci Immunol ; 6(62)2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434875

ABSTRACT

Circulating autoantibodies (auto-Abs) neutralizing high concentrations (10 ng/mL, in plasma diluted 1 to 10) of IFN-α and/or -ω are found in about 10% of patients with critical COVID-19 pneumonia, but not in subjects with asymptomatic infections. We detect auto-Abs neutralizing 100-fold lower, more physiological, concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω (100 pg/mL, in 1/10 dilutions of plasma) in 13.6% of 3,595 patients with critical COVID-19, including 21% of 374 patients > 80 years, and 6.5% of 522 patients with severe COVID-19. These antibodies are also detected in 18% of the 1,124 deceased patients (aged 20 days-99 years; mean: 70 years). Moreover, another 1.3% of patients with critical COVID-19 and 0.9% of the deceased patients have auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-ß. We also show, in a sample of 34,159 uninfected subjects from the general population, that auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω are present in 0.18% of individuals between 18 and 69 years, 1.1% between 70 and 79 years, and 3.4% >80 years. Moreover, the proportion of subjects carrying auto-Abs neutralizing lower concentrations is greater in a subsample of 10,778 uninfected individuals: 1% of individuals <70 years, 2.3% between 70 and 80 years, and 6.3% >80 years. By contrast, auto-Abs neutralizing IFN-ß do not become more frequent with age. Auto-Abs neutralizing type I IFNs predate SARS-CoV-2 infection and sharply increase in prevalence after the age of 70 years. They account for about 20% of both critical COVID-19 cases in the over-80s, and total fatal COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Critical Illness , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Middle Aged , Young Adult
6.
Infect Genet Evol ; 95: 105092, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433676

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare the demographics, clinical characteristics and severity of patients infected with nine different SARS-CoV-2 variants, during three phases of the COVID-19 epidemic in Marseille. METHODS: A single centre retrospective cohort study was conducted in 1760 patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 of Nextstrain clades 20A, 20B, and 20C (first phase, February-May 2020), Pangolin lineages B.1.177 (we named Marseille-2) and B.1.160 (Marseille-4) variants (second phase, June-December 2020), and B.1.1.7 (alpha), B.1.351 (beta), P.1 (gamma) and A.27 (Marseille-501) variants (third phase, January 2021-today). Outcomes were the occurrence of clinical failures, including hospitalisation, transfer to the intensive-care unit, and death. RESULTS: During each phase, no major differences were observed with regards to age and gender distribution, the prevalence of chronic diseases, and clinical symptoms between variants circulating in a given phase. The B.1.177 and B.1.160 variants were associated with more severe outcomes. Infections occurring during the second phase were associated with a higher rate of death as compared to infections during the first and third phases. Patients in the second phase were more likely to be hospitalised than those in the third phase. Patients infected during the third phase were more frequently obese than others. CONCLUSION: A large cohort study is recommended to evaluate the transmissibility and to better characterise the clinical severity of emerging variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Genome, Viral , Hypertension/pathology , Obesity/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/virology , Female , France/epidemiology , Genotype , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/mortality , Heart Diseases/pathology , Heart Diseases/virology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/mortality , Hypertension/virology , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/pathology , Neoplasms/virology , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/mortality , Obesity/virology , Phylogeny , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis
8.
Int J Infect Dis ; 96: 154-156, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385692

ABSTRACT

Respiratory viruses are a major cause of mortality worldwide and in France, where they cause several thousands of deaths every year. University Hospital Institute-Méditerranée Infection performs real-time surveillance of all diagnoses of infections and associated deaths in public hospitals in Marseille, Southeastern France. This study compared mortality associated with diagnoses of respiratory viruses during the colder months of 2018-2019 and 2019-2020 (week 47-week 14). In 2018-2019, 73 patients (0.17% of 42,851 hospitalized patients) died after being diagnosed with a respiratory virus; 40 and 13 deaths occurred in patients diagnosed with influenza A virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), respectively. In 2019-2020, 50 patients (0.10% of 49,043 patients hospitalized) died after being diagnosed with a common respiratory virus; seven and seven deaths occurred in patients diagnosed with influenza A virus and RSV, respectively. Additionally, 55 patients died after being diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2. The proportion of respiratory virus-associated deaths among hospitalized patients was thus significantly lower for common respiratory viruses in 2019-2020 than in 2018-2019 (102 versus 170 per 100,000 hospitalized patients; p = 0.003), primarily as a consequence of a decrease in influenza A virus (-83%) and RSV (-46%)-associated deaths. Overall, the proportion of respiratory virus-associated deaths among hospitalized patients was higher, but not significantly, in 2019-2020 than in 2018-2019 (214 versus 170 per 100,000 hospitalized patients; p = 0.08, Yates-corrected Chi-square test). These findings put into perspective the death burden of SARS-CoV-2 infections in this geographical area.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Influenza A virus , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
9.
Sci Immunol ; 6(62)2021 08 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367379

ABSTRACT

Circulating autoantibodies (auto-Abs) neutralizing high concentrations (10 ng/mL, in plasma diluted 1 to 10) of IFN-α and/or -ω are found in about 10% of patients with critical COVID-19 pneumonia, but not in subjects with asymptomatic infections. We detect auto-Abs neutralizing 100-fold lower, more physiological, concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω (100 pg/mL, in 1/10 dilutions of plasma) in 13.6% of 3,595 patients with critical COVID-19, including 21% of 374 patients > 80 years, and 6.5% of 522 patients with severe COVID-19. These antibodies are also detected in 18% of the 1,124 deceased patients (aged 20 days-99 years; mean: 70 years). Moreover, another 1.3% of patients with critical COVID-19 and 0.9% of the deceased patients have auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-ß. We also show, in a sample of 34,159 uninfected subjects from the general population, that auto-Abs neutralizing high concentrations of IFN-α and/or -ω are present in 0.18% of individuals between 18 and 69 years, 1.1% between 70 and 79 years, and 3.4% >80 years. Moreover, the proportion of subjects carrying auto-Abs neutralizing lower concentrations is greater in a subsample of 10,778 uninfected individuals: 1% of individuals <70 years, 2.3% between 70 and 80 years, and 6.3% >80 years. By contrast, auto-Abs neutralizing IFN-ß do not become more frequent with age. Auto-Abs neutralizing type I IFNs predate SARS-CoV-2 infection and sharply increase in prevalence after the age of 70 years. They account for about 20% of both critical COVID-19 cases in the over-80s, and total fatal COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
Autoantibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Critical Illness , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Middle Aged , Young Adult
10.
J Clin Med ; 10(15)2021 Jul 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325716

ABSTRACT

Since summer 2020, SARS-CoV-2 strains at the origin of the COVID-19 pandemic have suddenly been replaced by new SARS-CoV-2 variants, some of which are highly transmissible and spread at a high rate. These variants include the Marseille-4 lineage (Nextclade 20A.EU2) in Europe, the 20I/501Y.V1 variant first detected in the UK, the 20H/501Y.V2 variant first detected in South Africa, and the 20J/501Y.V3 variant first detected in Brazil. These variants are characterized by multiple mutations in the viral spike protein that is targeted by neutralizing antibodies elicited in response to infection or vaccine immunization. The usual coronavirus mutation rate through genetic drift alone cannot account for such rapid changes. Recent reports of the occurrence of such mutations in immunocompromised patients who received remdesivir and/or convalescent plasma or monoclonal antibodies to treat prolonged SARS-CoV-2 infections led us to hypothesize that experimental therapies that fail to cure the patients from COVID-19 could favor the emergence of immune escape SARS-CoV-2 variants. We review here the data that support this hypothesis and urge physicians and clinical trial promoters to systematically monitor viral mutations by whole-genome sequencing for patients who are administered these treatments.

11.
Front Immunol ; 12: 625732, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291351

ABSTRACT

The etiological agent of COVID-19 SARS-CoV-2, is primarily a pulmonary-tropic coronavirus. Infection of alveolar pneumocytes by SARS-CoV-2 requires virus binding to the angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) monocarboxypeptidase. ACE2, present on the surface of many cell types, is known to be a regulator of blood pressure homeostasis through its ability to catalyze the proteolysis of Angiotensin II (Ang II) into Angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)]. We therefore hypothesized that SARS-CoV-2 could trigger variations of ACE2 expression and Ang II plasma concentration in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. We report here, that circulating blood cells from COVID-19 patients express less ACE2 mRNA than cells from healthy volunteers. At the level of circulating cells, this ACE2 gene dysregulation mainly affects the monocytes, which also show a lower expression of membrane ACE2 protein. Moreover, soluble ACE2 (sACE2) plasma concentrations are lower in prolonged viral shedders than in healthy controls, while the concentration of sACE2 returns to normal levels in short viral shedders. In the plasma of prolonged viral shedders, we also found higher concentrations of Ang II and angiotensin I (Ang I). On the other hand, the plasma levels of Ang-(1-7) remains almost stable in prolonged viral shedders but seems insufficient to prevent the adverse effects of Ang II accumulation. Altogether, these data evidence that the SARS-CoV-2 may affect the expression of blood pressure regulators with possible harmful consequences on COVID-19 outcome.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin II/blood , Angiotensin I/blood , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , COVID-19/blood , Peptide Fragments/blood , Adult , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Female , Gene Expression Profiling , HLA-DR Antigens , Humans , Lipopolysaccharide Receptors , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/immunology , Monocytes/metabolism , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , RNA, Messenger , Virus Shedding
12.
J Clin Med ; 10(12)2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270068

ABSTRACT

A commercially available isothermal amplification of SARS-CoV-2 RNA was applied to self-collected saliva samples using dry dental cotton rolls, which were held in the mouth for two minutes. Of 212 tests, isothermal amplification yielded three (0.14%) invalid results, 120 (56.6%) positive results and 89 (42%) negative results. Compared to reference RT-PCR assays routinely performed simultaneously on nasopharyngeal swabs, excluding the three invalid isothermal amplification assays and one RT-PCR invalid assay, these figures indicated that 119/123 (96.7%) samples were positive in both methods and 85/85 samples were negative in both methods. Four positive buccal swabs which were missed by the isothermal amplification, exhibited Ct values of 26-34 in reference RT-PCR assays. Positive isothermal amplification detection was achieved in less than 10 min. Supervision of the self-sampling procedure was key to achieve these performances. These data support the proposal to use the protocol reported in this paper, including supervised buccal self-sampling, to screen people suspected of having COVID-19 at the point of care.

13.
J Clin Med ; 10(12)2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270066

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We conducted this review to summarize the relation between viral mutation and infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 and also the severity of COVID-19 in vivo and in vitro. METHOD: Articles were identified through a literature search until 31 May 2021, in PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar. RESULTS: Sixty-three studies were included. To date, most studies showed that the viral mutations, especially the D614G variant, correlate with a higher infectivity than the wild-type virus. However, the evidence of the association between viral mutation and severity of the disease is scant. A SARS-CoV-2 variant with a 382-nucleotide deletion was associated with less severe infection in patients. The 11,083G > U mutation was significantly associated with asymptomatic patients. By contrast, ORF1ab 4715L and S protein 614G variants were significantly more frequent in patients from countries where high fatality rates were also reported. The current evidence showed that variants of concern have led to increased infectivity and deteriorating epidemiological situations. However, the relation between this variant and severity of COVID-19 infection was contradictory. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread worldwide. It is necessary to anticipate large clinical cohorts to evaluate the virulence and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 mutants.

15.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(10): 1516.e1-1516.e6, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240263

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To compare the clinical and epidemiological aspects associated with different predominant lineages circulating in Marseille from March 2020 to January 2021. METHODS: In this single-centre retrospective cohort study, characteristics of patients infected with four different severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants were documented from medical files. The outcome was the occurrence of clinical failure, defined as hospitalization (for outpatients), transfer to the intensive care unit (inpatients) and death (all). RESULTS: A total of 254 patients were infected with clade 20A (20AS), 85 with Marseille-1 (M1V), 190 with Marseille-4 (M4V) and 211 with N501Y (N501YV) variants. 20AS presented a bell-shaped epidemiological curve and nearly disappeared around May 2020. M1V reached a very weak peak, then disappeared after six weeks. M4V appeared in July presented an atypical wave form for 7 months. N501YV has only recently appeared. Compared with 20AS, patients infected with M1V were less likely to report dyspnoea (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.50, p 0.04), rhinitis (aOR 0.57, p 0.04) and to be hospitalized (aOR 0.22, p 0.002). Patients infected with M4V were more likely to report fever than those with 20AS and M1V (aOR 2.49, p < 0.0001 and aOR 2.30, p 0.007, respectively) and to be hospitalized than those with M1V (aOR 4.81, p 0.003). Patients infected with N501YV reported lower rate of rhinitis (aOR 0.50, p 0.001) and anosmia (aOR 0.57, p 0.02), compared with those infected with 20AS. A lower rate of hospitalization was associated with N501YV infection compared with 20AS and M4V (aOR 0.33, p < 0.0001 and aOR 0.27, p < 0.0001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The four lineages have presentations that differ from one another, epidemiologically and clinically. This supports SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance through next-generation sequencing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , France/epidemiology , Genotype , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
16.
Viruses ; 13(5)2021 05 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227067

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal shedding contributes to the spread of the COVID-19 epidemic. Among 3271 COVID-19 patients treated at the Hospital University Institute Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France from 3 March to 27 April 2020, tested at least twice by qRT-PCR, the median SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal shedding duration was 6 days (range 2-54 days). Compared with short shedders (qRT-PCR positivity < 10 days), 34 (1.04%) persistent shedders (qRT-PCR positivity ≥ 17 days; mean ± SD: 23.3 ± 3.8 days) were significantly older, with associated comorbidities, exhibiting lymphopenia, eosinopenia, increased D-dimer and increased troponin (p < 0.05), and were hospitalized in intensive care unit in 17.7% vs. 1.1% of cases (p < 0.0001). Viral culture was positive in six persistent shedders after day 10, including in one patient after day 17, and no viral co-pathogen was detected in 33 tested patients. Persistent shedders received azithromycin plus hydroxychloroquine ≥ 3 days in 26/34 (76.5%) patients, a figure significantly lower than in short shedders (86.6%) (p = 0.042). Accordingly, mortality was 14.7% vs. 0.5% (p < 0.0001). Persistent shedding was significantly associated with persistent dyspnea and anosmia/ageusia (p < 0.05). In the context of COVID-19 treatment, including treatment with azithromycin plus hydroxychloroquine, the persistence of SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal shedding was a rare event, most frequently encountered in elderly patients with comorbidities and lacking azithromycin plus hydroxychloroquine treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Virus Shedding/drug effects , Adult , Aged , Azithromycin/metabolism , Azithromycin/pharmacology , COVID-19/drug therapy , Comorbidity , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
17.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(9): 1352.e1-1352.e5, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225181

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Surveillance of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genomic epidemiology led us to detect several variants since summer 2020. We report the recent spread of a new SARS-CoV-2 spike 501Y variant. METHODS: SARS-CoV-2 sequences obtained from human nasopharyngeal samples by Illumina next-generation sequencing were analysed using Nextclade and an in-house Python script and were compared using BLASTn to the GISAID database. Phylogeny was investigated using the IQ-TREE software. RESULTS: We identified that SARS-CoV-2 genomes from four patients diagnosed in our institute harboured a new set of amino acid substitutions including L18F, L452R, N501Y, A653V, H655Y, D796Y, G1219V ± Q677H. These spike N501Y genomes are the first of Nextstrain clade 19B. We obtained partial spike gene sequences of this genotype for an additional 43 patients. All patients infected with this genotype were diagnosed since mid-January 2021. We detected 42 other genomes of this genotype in GISAID, which were obtained from samples collected in December 2020 in four individuals and in 2021 in 38 individuals. The 89 sequences obtained in our institute or other laboratories originated from the Comoros archipelago, western European countries (mostly metropolitan France), Turkey and Nigeria. CONCLUSION: These findings warrant further studies to investigate the spread, epidemiological and clinical features, and sensitivity to immune responses of this variant.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Substitution , COVID-19/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/classification , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , France , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , Models, Molecular , Nasopharynx/virology , Nigeria , Phylogeny , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Turkey
18.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 228-236, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207034

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Marseille, France, following a first severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak in March-May 2020, a second epidemic phase occurred from June, involving 10 new variants. The Marseille-4 variant caused an epidemic that started in August and is still ongoing. METHODS: The 1038 SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequences obtained in our laboratory by next-generation sequencing with Illumina technology were analysed using Nextclade and nextstrain/ncov pipelines and IQ-TREE. A Marseille-4-specific qPCR assay was implemented. Demographic and clinical features were compared between patients with the Marseille-4 variant and those with earlier strains. RESULTS: Marseille-4 harbours 13 hallmark mutations. One leads to an S477N substitution in the receptor binding domain of the spike protein targeted by current vaccines. Using a specific qPCR, it was observed that Marseille-4 caused 12-100% of SARS-CoV-2 infections in Marseille from September 2020, being involved in 2106 diagnoses. This variant was more frequently associated with hypoxemia than were clade 20A strains before May 2020. It caused a re-infection in 11 patients diagnosed with different SARS-CoV-2 strains before June 2020, suggesting either short-term protective immunity or a lack of cross-immunity. CONCLUSIONS: Marseille-4 should be considered as a major SARS-CoV-2 variant. Its sudden appearance points towards an animal reservoir, possibly mink. The protective role of past exposure and current vaccines against this variant should be evaluated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genome, Viral , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Whole Genome Sequencing , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Epidemics , France/epidemiology , Humans , Mink/virology , Molecular Epidemiology , Phylogeny , Reinfection/virology
20.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 1-3, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163872

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In a conventional hospital ward, we used high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) to treat elderly COVID-19 patients noneligible for intensive care unit transfer. METHODS: This study was conducted in the Institut Hospitalo-Universitaire Méditerranée Infection, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille (AP-HM), France. We used high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) in our conventional infectious disease ward from 15 September 2020 for elderly patients noneligible for intensive care unit transfer. RESULTS: Of the 44 patients (median age 83 years (57-94), mean: 80.25), 61.4% (27/44) were men. The median Charlson score was 7 (1-15). The median of the NEWS-2 score upon admission was 8 (3-11) and was 10 at the time of initiation of HFNO. The median PaO2/FiO2 ratio was 103 (71-151) prior to HNFO initiation. Among the 44 patients, 16 patients (36.4%) had been weaned from HFNO, and 28 patients had died (63.6%). CONCLUSIONS: In this preliminary report, we observed that HFNO saved the lives of one-third of elderly COVID-19 patients who would have systematically died.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , RNA, Viral , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Contraindications , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Oxygen , SARS-CoV-2
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