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1.
Heart ; 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583068

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Using a large national database of people hospitalised with COVID-19, we investigated the contribution of cardio-metabolic conditions, multi-morbidity and ethnicity on the risk of in-hospital cardiovascular complications and death. METHODS: A multicentre, prospective cohort study in 302 UK healthcare facilities of adults hospitalised with COVID-19 between 6 February 2020 and 16 March 2021. Logistic models were used to explore associations between baseline patient ethnicity, cardiometabolic conditions and multimorbidity (0, 1, 2, >2 conditions), and in-hospital cardiovascular complications (heart failure, arrhythmia, cardiac ischaemia, cardiac arrest, coagulation complications, stroke), renal injury and death. RESULTS: Of 65 624 patients hospitalised with COVID-19, 44 598 (68.0%) reported at least one cardiometabolic condition on admission. Cardiovascular/renal complications or death occurred in 24 609 (38.0%) patients. Baseline cardiometabolic conditions were independently associated with increased odds of in-hospital complications and this risk increased in the presence of cardiometabolic multimorbidity. For example, compared with having no cardiometabolic conditions, 1, 2 or ≥3 conditions was associated with 1.46 (95% CI 1.39 to 1.54), 2.04 (95% CI 1.93 to 2.15) and 3.10 (95% CI 2.92 to 3.29) times higher odds of any cardiovascular/renal complication, respectively. A similar pattern was observed for all-cause death. Compared with the white group, the South Asian (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.29) and black (OR 1.53 to 95% CI 1.37 to 1.72) ethnic groups had higher risk of any cardiovascular/renal complication. CONCLUSIONS: In hospitalised patients with COVID-19, cardiovascular complications or death impacts just under half of all patients, with the highest risk in those of South Asian or Black ethnicity and in patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity.

2.
Glob Heart ; 16(1): 22, 2021 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557646

ABSTRACT

Background: The emergence of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has presented an unprecedented global challenge for the healthcare community. The ability of SARS-CoV-2 to get transmitted during the asymptomatic phase, and its high infectivity have led to the rapid transmission of COVID-19 beyond geographic regions facilitated by international travel, leading to a pandemic. To guide effective control and interventions, primary data is required urgently, globally, including from low- and middle-income countries where documentation of cardiovascular manifestations and risk factors in people hospitalized with COVID-19 is limited. Objectives: This study aims to describe the cardiovascular manifestations and cardiovascular risk factors in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Methods: We propose to conduct an observational cohort study involving 5000 patients recruited from hospitals in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Eligible adult COVID-19 patients will be recruited from the participating hospitals and followed-up until 30 days post admission. The outcomes will be reported at discharge and includes the need of ICU admission, need of ventilator, death (with cause), major adverse cardiovascular events, neurological outcomes, acute renal failure, and pulmonary outcomes. Conclusion: Given the enormous burden posed by COVID-19 and the associated severe prognostic implication of CVD involvement, this study will provide useful insights on the risk factors for severe disease, clinical presentation, and outcomes of various cardiovascular manifestations in COVID-19 patients particularly from low and middle income countries from where the data remain scant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Global Health , Observational Studies as Topic/methods , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Prognosis , Risk Factors
6.
Circ Heart Fail ; 13(10): e007218, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-805484

ABSTRACT

Currently, South Asia accounts for a quarter of the world population, yet it already claims ≈60% of the global burden of heart disease. Besides the epidemics of type 2 diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease already faced by South Asian countries, recent studies suggest that South Asians may also be at an increased risk of heart failure (HF), and that it presents at earlier ages than in most other racial/ethnic groups. Although a frequently underrecognized threat, an eventual HF epidemic in the densely populated South Asian nations could have dramatic health, social and economic consequences, and urgent interventions are needed to flatten the curve of HF in South Asia. In this review, we discuss recent studies portraying these trends, and describe the mechanisms that may explain an increased risk of premature HF in South Asians compared with other groups, with a special focus on highly relevant features in South Asian populations including premature coronary heart disease, early type 2 diabetes mellitus, ubiquitous abdominal obesity, exposure to the world's highest levels of air pollution, highly prevalent pretransition forms of HF such as rheumatic heart disease, and underdevelopment of healthcare systems. Other rising lifestyle-related risk factors such as use of tobacco products, hypertension, and general obesity are also discussed. We evaluate the prognosis of HF in South Asian countries and the implications of an anticipated HF epidemic. Finally, we discuss proposed interventions aimed at curbing these adverse trends, management approaches that can improve the prognosis of prevalent HF in South Asian countries, and research gaps in this important field.


Subject(s)
Epidemics , Heart Failure/ethnology , Age of Onset , Asia/epidemiology , Health Services Needs and Demand , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/prevention & control , Humans , Needs Assessment , Prevalence , Preventive Health Services , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
7.
Glob Heart ; 15(1): 44, 2020 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761019

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we provide recommendations on the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among patients with confirmed or suspected coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to facilitate the decision making of healthcare professionals in low resource settings. The emergence of novel coronavirus disease, also known as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has presented an unprecedented global challenge for the healthcare community. The ability of SARS-CoV-2 to get transmitted during the asymptomatic phase and its high infectivity have led to the rapid transmission of COVID-19 beyond geographic regions, leading to a pandemic. There is concern that COVID-19 is cardiotropic, and it interacts with the cardiovascular system on multiple levels. Individuals with established CVD are more susceptible to severe COVID-19. Through a consensus approach involving an international group this WHF statement summarizes the links between cardiovascular disease and COVID-19 and present some practical recommendations for the management of hypertension and diabetes, acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, rheumatic heart disease, Chagas disease, and myocardial injury for patients with COVID-19 in low-resource settings. This document is not a clinical guideline and it is not intended to replace national clinical guidelines or recommendations. Given the rapidly growing burden posed by COVID-19 illness and the associated severe prognostic implication of CVD involvement, further research is required to understand the potential mechanisms linking COVID-19 and CVD, clinical presentation, and outcomes of various cardiovascular manifestations in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Decision Trees , Health Resources , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic
8.
Eur Heart J ; 41(22): 2109-2117, 2020 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-526858

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has important implications for the safety of participants in clinical trials and the research staff caring for them and, consequently, for the trials themselves. Patients with heart failure may be at greater risk of infection with COVID-19 and the consequences might also be more serious, but they are also at risk of adverse outcomes if their clinical care is compromised. As physicians and clinical trialists, it is our responsibility to ensure safe and effective care is delivered to trial participants without affecting the integrity of the trial. The social contract with our patients demands no less. Many regulatory authorities from different world regions have issued guidance statements regarding the conduct of clinical trials during this COVID-19 crisis. However, international trials may benefit from expert guidance from a global panel of experts to supplement local advice and regulations, thereby enhancing the safety of participants and the integrity of the trial. Accordingly, the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology on 21 and 22 March 2020 conducted web-based meetings with expert clinical trialists in Europe, North America, South America, Australia, and Asia. The main objectives of this Expert Position Paper are to highlight the challenges that this pandemic poses for the conduct of clinical trials in heart failure and to offer advice on how they might be overcome, with some practical examples. While this panel of experts are focused on heart failure clinical trials, these discussions and recommendations may apply to clinical trials in other therapeutic areas.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Coronavirus Infections , Heart Failure , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Research Design/standards , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials as Topic/ethics , Clinical Trials as Topic/standards , Europe , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/therapy , Humans , Informed Consent/ethics , Informed Consent/standards , Patient Safety , Patient Selection/ethics , SARS-CoV-2
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