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Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi ; 41(4): 280-286, 2023 Apr 20.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245733

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the wearing of masks and the knowledge of masks among high-risk positions for overseas import and pollution transmission. Methods: From May 14 to 17, 2022, a convenient sampling method was used to conduct an online survey among 963 workers in high-risk positions for overseas import and pollution transmission in Beijing. The behaviors of individual use and wearing masks, the distribution and supervision of the unit, the knowledge of personal mask protection and the subjective feelings of wearing masks were analyzed. The χ(2) test and logistic regression model were used to analyze the influencing factors of the correct selection of masks. Results: The majority of the workers in high-risk positions for overseas import and pollution transmission were male (86.0%, 828/963), age concentration in 18-44 years old (68.2%, 657/963), and the majority of them had college or bachelor degrees (49.4%, 476/963). 79.4%(765/963) of the workers chose the right type of masks, female, 45-59 years old and high school education or above were the risk factors for correct selection of masks (P <0.05). Workers had good behaviors such as wearing/removing masks, but only 10.5% (101/963) could correctly rank the protective effect of different masks. 98.4% (948/963) of the workers believed that their work units had provided masks to their employees, and 99.1% (954/963) and 98.2%(946/963) of them had organized training and supervision on the use of masks, respectively. 47.4%(456/963) of the workers were uncomfortable while wearing masks. Conclusion: The overall selection and use of masks among occupational groups in high-risk positions for overseas import and pollution transmission in China need to be further standardized. It is necessary to strengthen supervision and inspection on the use of masks among occupational groups, and take improvement measures to improve the comfort of wearing masks.


Subject(s)
Masks , Humans , Male , Female , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , China , Surveys and Questionnaires , Beijing
2.
Open Heart ; 10(1)2023 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2283194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We investigated the associations of healthcare worker status with multisystem illness trajectory in hospitalised post-COVID-19 individuals. METHODS AND RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-eight patients were evaluated 28-60 days after the last episode of hospital care. Thirty-six (21%) were healthcare workers. Compared with non-healthcare workers, healthcare workers were of similar age (51.3 (8.7) years vs 55.0 (12.4) years; p=0.09) more often women (26 (72%) vs 48 (38%); p<0.01) and had lower 10-year cardiovascular risk (%) (8.1 (7.9) vs 15.0 (11.5); p<0.01) and Coronavirus Clinical Characterisation Consortium in-hospital mortality risk (7.3 (10.2) vs 12.7 (9.8); p<0.01). Healthcare worker status associated with less acute inflammation (peak C reactive protein 48 mg/L (IQR: 14-165) vs 112 mg/L (52-181)), milder illness reflected by WHO clinical severity score distribution (p=0.04) and shorter duration of admission (4 days (IQR: 2-6) vs 6 days (3-12)).In adjusted multivariate logistic regression analysis, healthcare worker status associated with a binary classification (probable/very likely vs not present/unlikely) of adjudicated myocarditis (OR: 2.99; 95% CI (1.01 to 8.89) by 28-60 days postdischarge).After a mean (SD, range) duration of follow-up after hospital discharge of 450 (88) days (range 290, 627 days), fewer healthcare workers died or were rehospitalised (1 (3%) vs 22 (17%); p=0.038) and secondary care referrals for post-COVID-19 syndrome were common (42%) and similar to non-healthcare workers (38%; p=0.934). CONCLUSION: Healthcare worker status was independently associated with the likelihood of adjudicated myocarditis, despite better antecedent health. Two in five healthcare workers had a secondary care referral for post-COVID-19 syndrome. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04403607.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Aftercare , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Myocarditis/epidemiology , Patient Discharge , Post-Acute COVID-19 Syndrome , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Male , Adult , Aged
3.
Research and Practice in Thrombosis and Haemostasis ; 5(SUPPL 2), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1509071

ABSTRACT

Background : Since the emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2(SARS-CoV-2) in late December 2019, there has been increasing recognition of the pro-thrombotic risk this virus can cause as part of Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). Aims : To assess if the rate of PTE was increased in those with COVID-19 in both critical care and ward patients. To assess the effect of right heart strain or requirement for critical care on mortality. Methods : We reviewed all computed tomography pulmonary angiograms (CTPA) performed in Scotland between 23 rd March and 31 st May 2020 (1st wave) and identified those inpatients with COVID-19 using either classical radiological appearances, or positive COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction swab. 3401 CTPAs were reviewed. 192 were positive for PTE in patients with evidence of COVID-19 either real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) swab positive for SARS-CoV-2 [ n = 104] or having radiological changes consistent with COVID-19 [ n = 88]). The total number of hospital admissions in Scotland between 23 rd March 2020 and 31 st May 2020 with COVID-19 was 5195. The incidence of PTE during this time was 3.7% in all patients admitted to all hospitals in Scotland with COVID-19 during this period. 475 hospitalised patients were managed in critical care (both level 2 and level 3 care), in whom the incidence of PTE was 6% ( n = 29). 4720 patients required ward based care alone and the incidence of PTE was 3.5% ( n = 163). This compares to the national pre-Covid rate of 1%. There was increased risk of death with right heart strain (25/52 vs 128/140[ P < 0.01]) and in critical care (15/29 vs 146/163[ P < 0.01]). Conclusions : In this national study, we have demonstrated an increased risk of pulmonary thromboembolism in both critical care and ward based environments.

4.
J Infect ; 81(3): 411-419, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-505742

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To understand SARS-Co-V-2 infection and transmission in UK nursing homes in order to develop preventive strategies for protecting the frail elderly residents. METHODS: An outbreak investigation involving 394 residents and 70 staff, was carried out in 4 nursing homes affected by COVID-19 outbreaks in central London. Two point-prevalence surveys were performed one week apart where residents underwent SARS-CoV-2 testing and had relevant symptoms documented. Asymptomatic staff from three of the four homes were also offered SARS-CoV-2 testing. RESULTS: Overall, 26% (95% CI 22-31) of residents died over the two-month period. All-cause mortality increased by 203% (95% CI 70-336) compared with previous years. Systematic testing identified 40% (95% CI 35-46) of residents as positive for SARS-CoV-2, and of these 43% (95% CI 34-52) were asymptomatic and 18% (95% CI 11-24) had only atypical symptoms; 4% (95% CI -1 to 9) of asymptomatic staff also tested positive. CONCLUSIONS: The SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in four UK nursing homes was associated with very high infection and mortality rates. Many residents developed either atypical or had no discernible symptoms. A number of asymptomatic staff members also tested positive, suggesting a role for regular screening of both residents and staff in mitigating future outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Nursing Homes , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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