Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 20
Filter
1.
Kidney360 ; 2(11): 1770-1780, 2021 11 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776871

ABSTRACT

Background: Immune responses to vaccination are a known trigger for a new onset of glomerular disease or disease flare in susceptible individuals. Mass immunization against SARS-CoV-2 in the COVID-19 pandemic provides a unique opportunity to study vaccination-associated autoimmune kidney diseases. In the recent literature, there are several patient reports demonstrating a temporal association of SARS-CoV-2 immunization and kidney diseases. Methods: Here, we present a series of 29 cases of biopsy-proven glomerular disease in patients recently vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 and identified patients who developed a new onset of IgA nephropathy, minimal change disease, membranous nephropathy, ANCA-associated GN, collapsing glomerulopathy, or diffuse lupus nephritis diagnosed on kidney biopsies postimmunization, as well as recurrent ANCA-associated GN. This included 28 cases of de novo GN within native kidney biopsies and one disease flare in an allograft. Results: The patients with collapsing glomerulopathy were of Black descent and had two APOL1 genomic risk alleles. A brief literature review of patient reports and small series is also provided to include all reported cases to date (n=52). The incidence of induction of glomerular disease in response to SARS-CoV-2 immunization is unknown; however, there was no overall increase in incidence of glomerular disease when compared with the 2 years prior to the COVID-19 pandemic diagnosed on kidney biopsies in our practice. Conclusions: Glomerular disease to vaccination is rare, although it should be monitored as a potential adverse event.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glomerulonephritis, IGA , Apolipoprotein L1 , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Glomerulonephritis, IGA/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
3.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(10): 2561-2575, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1521396

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) acute kidney injury (AKI) to sepsis-AKI (S-AKI). The morphology and transcriptomic and proteomic characteristics of autopsy kidneys were analyzed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Individuals 18 years of age and older who died from COVID-19 and had an autopsy performed at Mayo Clinic between April 2020 to October 2020 were included. Morphological evaluation of the kidneys of 17 individuals with COVID-19 was performed. In a subset of seven COVID-19 cases with postmortem interval of less than or equal to 20 hours, ultrastructural and molecular characteristics (targeted transcriptome and proteomics analyses of tubulointerstitium) were evaluated. Molecular characteristics were compared with archived cases of S-AKI and nonsepsis causes of AKI. RESULTS: The spectrum of COVID-19 renal pathology included macrophage-dominant microvascular inflammation (glomerulitis and peritubular capillaritis), vascular dysfunction (peritubular capillary congestion and endothelial injury), and tubular injury with ultrastructural evidence of mitochondrial damage. Investigation of the spatial architecture using a novel imaging mass cytometry revealed enrichment of CD3+CD4+ T cells in close proximity to antigen-presenting cells, and macrophage-enriched glomerular and interstitial infiltrates, suggesting an innate and adaptive immune tissue response. Coronavirus disease 2019 AKI and S-AKI, as compared to nonseptic AKI, had an enrichment of transcriptional pathways involved in inflammation (apoptosis, autophagy, major histocompatibility complex class I and II, and type 1 T helper cell differentiation). Proteomic pathway analysis showed that COVID-19 AKI and to a lesser extent S-AKI were enriched in necroptosis and sirtuin-signaling pathways, both involved in regulatory response to inflammation. Upregulation of the ceramide-signaling pathway and downregulation of oxidative phosphorylation in COVID-19 AKI were noted. CONCLUSION: This data highlights the similarities between S-AKI and COVID-19 AKI and suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a pivotal role in COVID-19 AKI. This data may allow the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , Kidney/pathology , Sepsis/pathology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Autopsy , Humans , Kidney Tubules, Proximal/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Sepsis/virology
4.
Orthopedics ; 44(5): 293-298, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444385

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) rapidly changed the landscape of health care, particularly in the New York City area. The elderly population is particularly vulnerable to both the novel coronavirus and the effects of a fracture. The goal of this study was to compare trends and outcomes of hip fracture patients during the pandemic. This was a retrospective chart review of hip fracture patients from a suburban academic hospital on Long Island, New York, who presented from March 1 to May 30, 2020. Patient COVID-19 status, demographics, and hospital outcome measures were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using heteroscedastic t tests for quantitative variables and chi-square tests for qualitative variables. There were 82 patients in the 2020 cohort and 111 in the 2019 control group, representing a 29.9% decrease in cases. The 2020 cohort presented to the hospital an average of 2.77 days after injury compared with 1.15 days for the 2019 control group (P=.0976). Patients in the 2020 cohort were more likely to be discharged home than to rehabilitation (P<.0001) and tended to be discharged with oral anticoagulation (P=.0809). There was no increase in 1-, 3-, or 6-month complications or mortality. During the pandemic, fewer patients were admitted with hip fractures, and the time from injury to presentation doubled. Patients were significantly less likely to be discharged to rehabilitation and more were discharged with oral anticoagulants. Overall, there was no increase in complications, and these data indicate that the authors were successfully able to provide high-quality care to hip fracture patients during the pandemic. [Orthopedics. 2021;44(5):293-298.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hip Fractures/epidemiology , Hip Fractures/surgery , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Discharge , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
5.
Kidney Int ; 100(6): 1303-1315, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1336699

ABSTRACT

Kidney failure is common in patients with Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19), resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. In an international collaboration, 284 kidney biopsies were evaluated to improve understanding of kidney disease in COVID-19. Diagnoses were compared to five years of 63,575 native biopsies prior to the pandemic and 13,955 allograft biopsies to identify diseases that have increased in patients with COVID-19. Genotyping for APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles was performed in 107 African American and Hispanic patients. Immunohistochemistry for SARS-CoV-2 was utilized to assess direct viral infection in 273 cases along with clinical information at the time of biopsy. The leading indication for native biopsy was acute kidney injury (45.4%), followed by proteinuria with or without concurrent acute kidney injury (42.6%). There were more African American patients (44.6%) than patients of other ethnicities. The most common diagnosis in native biopsies was collapsing glomerulopathy (25.8%), which was associated with high-risk APOL1 genotypes in 91.7% of cases. Compared to the five-year biopsy database, the frequency of myoglobin cast nephropathy and proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits was also increased in patients with COVID-19 (3.3% and 1.7%, respectively), while there was a reduced frequency of chronic conditions (including diabetes mellitus, IgA nephropathy, and arterionephrosclerosis) as the primary diagnosis. In transplants, the leading indication was acute kidney injury (86.4%), for which rejection was the predominant diagnosis (61.4%). Direct SARS-CoV-2 viral infection was not identified. Thus, our multi-center large case series identified kidney diseases that disproportionately affect patients with COVID-19 and demonstrated a high frequency of APOL1 high-risk genotypes within this group, with no evidence of direct viral infection within the kidney.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , Humans , Kidney , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Clin Nephrol Case Stud ; 9: 11-18, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106317

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Though respiratory, immune, and coagulation systems are major targets of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), kidney dysfunction, presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI), is also common. Most AKI cases in COVID-19 manifest as acute tubular injury (ATI) in conjunction with multiorgan failure. While initial renal pathological findings were limited to acute tubular necrosis and collapsing glomerulopathy, a recent case series reported a larger spectrum of findings. CASE REPORT: Here, we report a case of membranous nephropathy (MN) in an 81-year-old Hispanic man with underlying chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 who developed ATI in the setting of COVID-19. The patient was hospitalized for hypoxic respiratory failure in the setting of AKI stage 3 with serum creatinine 7.1 mg/dL 6 days after a positive-SARS-CoV-2 screening. He was found to have nephrotic range proteinuria, glycosuria (with normal serum glucose), anemia, and hypoalbuminemia. Kidney biopsy showed ATI and early MN. Workup for primary and secondary MN was unrevealing, and serum PLA2R antibody was negative. No viral particles were observed in podocytes. CONCLUSION: Although the MN could be incidental, this observation raises the question of whether SARS-CoV-2 infection can trigger or worsen an underlying MN from an exaggerated immune response associated with COVID-19.

7.
Surgery ; 169(6): 1340-1345, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087275

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the reopening of ambulatory centers, minimal data has been reported regarding positive tests among patients undergoing ambulatory procedures, associated delays in care, and outcomes of patients previously positive for coronavirus disease 2019. METHODS: A retrospective observational case series of ambulatory procedures was performed. Records since the reopening of ambulatory centers in New York were searched for patients with positive coronavirus disease 2019 nasal swab results who underwent ambulatory procedures. Chart reviews were conducted to determine coronavirus disease history and hospitalizations, demographic information, procedure details, and 30-day admissions. RESULTS: A total of 3,762 patients underwent ambulatory procedures. Of those, 53 were previously diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 but recovered and tested negative at preprocedural testing. Of the 3,709 asymptomatic patients, 37 (1.00%) tested positive during preprocedural testing; 21 patients had their procedures delayed on average 28.6 days until testing negative, while 16 had their procedures performed before testing negative owing to the time sensitivity of the procedure. There were no major complications or 30-day admissions in any of these asymptomatic patients. Three patients tested positive for coronavirus disease after having an ambulatory procedure. CONCLUSION: Positive tests in asymptomatic patients led to procedure delays of 28.6 days. No patients who underwent ambulatory procedures after a positive coronavirus disease 2019 test had any coronavirus disease-related complications, regardless of whether or not the procedure was delayed until testing negative. Three patients tested positive for coronavirus disease 2019 after having an ambulatory procedure; however, at an average of 19.7 days after, these cases were likely community acquired making the rate of nosocomial infection negligible.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Asymptomatic Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19 Testing/standards , Delayed Diagnosis , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Public Health Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Time-to-Treatment
8.
Circulation ; 143(3): 230-243, 2021 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039948

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its resultant clinical presentation, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is an emergent cause of mortality worldwide. Cardiac complications secondary to this infection are common; however, the underlying mechanisms of such remain unclear. A detailed cardiac evaluation of a series of individuals with COVID-19 undergoing postmortem evaluation is provided, with 4 aims: (1) describe the pathological spectrum of the myocardium; (2) compare with an alternate viral illness; (3) investigate angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 expression; and (4) provide the first description of the cardiac findings in patients with cleared infection. METHODS: Study cases were identified from institutional files and included COVID-19 (n=15: 12 active, 3 cleared), influenza A/B (n=6), and nonvirally mediated deaths (n=6). Salient information was abstracted from the medical record. Light microscopic findings were recorded. An angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 immunohistochemical H-score was compared across cases. Viral detection encompassed SARS-CoV-2 immunohistochemistry, ultrastructural examination, and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Male sex was more common in the COVID-19 group (P=0.05). Nonocclusive fibrin microthrombi (without ischemic injury) were identified in 16 cases (12 COVID-19, 2 influenza, and 2 controls) and were more common in the active COVID-19 cohort (P=0.006). Four active COVID-19 cases showed focal myocarditis, whereas 1 case of cleared COVID-19 showed extensive disease. Arteriolar angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 endothelial expression was lower in COVID-19 cases than in controls (P=0.004). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 myocardial expression did not differ by disease category, sex, age, or number of patient comorbidities (P=0.69, P=1.00, P=0.46, P=0.65, respectively). SARS-CoV-2 immunohistochemistry showed nonspecific staining, whereas ultrastructural examination and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction were negative for viral presence. Four patients (26.7%) with COVID-19 had underlying cardiac amyloidosis. Cases with cleared infection had variable presentations. CONCLUSIONS: This detailed histopathologic, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and molecular cardiac series showed no definitive evidence of direct myocardial infection. COVID-19 cases frequently have cardiac fibrin microthrombi, without universal acute ischemic injury. Moreover, myocarditis is present in 33.3% of patients with active and cleared COVID-19 but is usually limited in extent. Histological features of resolved infection are variable. Cardiac amyloidosis may be an additional risk factor for severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Thrombosis , Fibrin/metabolism , Myocardium , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronary Thrombosis/metabolism , Coronary Thrombosis/mortality , Coronary Thrombosis/pathology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/metabolism , Myocardium/pathology
9.
Kidney Int Rep ; 5(6): 935-939, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1025745
11.
Bioinformatics ; 36(5): 1627-1628, 2020 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-827484

ABSTRACT

MOTIVATION: Sequence repositories have few well-annotated virus mature peptide sequences. Therefore post-translational proteolytic processing of polyproteins into mature peptides (MPs) has been performed in silico, with a new computational method, for over 200 species in 5 pathogenic virus families (Caliciviridae, Coronaviridae, Flaviviridae, Picornaviridae and Togaviridae). RESULTS: Using pairwise alignment with reference sequences, MPs have been annotated and their sequences made available for search, analysis and download. At publication the method had produced 156 216 sequences, a large portion of the protein sequences now available in https://www.viprbrc.org. It represents a new and comprehensive mature peptide collection. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: The data are available at the Virus Pathogen Resource https://www.viprbrc.org, and the software at https://github.com/VirusBRC/vipr_mat_peptide.


Subject(s)
Polyproteins , Viruses , Amino Acid Sequence , Peptides , Software
13.
Nat Rev Nephrol ; 16(10): 614, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714796

ABSTRACT

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.

15.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 31(9): 1948-1958, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-651601

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reports show that AKI is a common complication of severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in hospitalized patients. Studies have also observed proteinuria and microscopic hematuria in such patients. Although a recent autopsy series of patients who died with severe COVID-19 in China found acute tubular necrosis in the kidney, a few patient reports have also described collapsing glomerulopathy in COVID-19. METHODS: We evaluated biopsied kidney samples from ten patients at our institution who had COVID-19 and clinical features of AKI, including proteinuria with or without hematuria. We documented clinical features, pathologic findings, and outcomes. RESULTS: Our analysis included ten patients who underwent kidney biopsy (mean age: 65 years); five patients were black, three were Hispanic, and two were white. All patients had proteinuria. Eight patients had severe AKI, necessitating RRT. All biopsy samples showed varying degrees of acute tubular necrosis, and one patient had associated widespread myoglobin casts. In addition, two patients had findings of thrombotic microangiopathy, one had pauci-immune crescentic GN, and another had global as well as segmental glomerulosclerosis with features of healed collapsing glomerulopathy. Interestingly, although the patients had confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection by RT-PCR, immunohistochemical staining of kidney biopsy samples for SARS-CoV-2 was negative in all ten patients. Also, ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy showed no evidence of viral particles in the biopsy samples. CONCLUSIONS: The most common finding in our kidney biopsy samples from ten hospitalized patients with AKI and COVID-19 was acute tubular necrosis. There was no evidence of SARS-CoV-2 in the biopsied kidney tissue.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/pathology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Kidney/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , Biopsy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Humans , Kidney/ultrastructure , Kidney Tubular Necrosis, Acute/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Lab Invest ; 100(11): 1485-1489, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638974

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease-19 (COVID-19), caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, was initially recognized in Wuhan, China and subsequently spread to all continents. The disease primarily affects the lower respiratory system, but may involve other organs and systems. Histopathologic evaluation of tissue from affected patients is crucial for diagnostic purposes, but also for advancing our understanding of the disease. For that reason, we developed immunohistochemical (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) assays for detection of the. virus. A total of eight autopsy lungs, one placenta, and ten kidney biopsies from COVID-19 patients were stained with a panel of commercially available antibodies for IHC and commercially available RNA probes for ISH. Similarly, autopsy lungs, placentas and renal biopsies from non-COVID-19 patients were stained with the same antibodies and probes. All eight lungs and the placenta from COVID-19 patients stained positive by IHC and ISH, while the kidney biopsies stained negative by both methodologies. As expected, all specimens from non-COVID-19 patients were IHC and ISH negative. These two assays represent a sensitive and specific method for detecting the virus in tissue samples. We provide the protocols and the list of commercially available antibodies and probes for these assays, so they can be readily implemented in pathology laboratories and medical examiner offices for diagnostic and research purposes.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Immunohistochemistry/methods , In Situ Hybridization/methods , Female , Humans , Indicators and Reagents , Kidney/virology , Lung/virology , Paraffin Embedding , Placenta/virology , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 31(8): 1688-1695, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-633952

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Kidney involvement is a feature of COVID-19 and it can be severe in Black patients. Previous research linked increased susceptibility to collapsing glomerulopathy, including in patients with HIV-associated nephropathy, to apo L1 (APOL1) variants that are more common in those of African descent. METHODS: To investigate genetic, histopathologic, and molecular features in six Black patients with COVID-19 presenting with AKI and de novo nephrotic-range proteinuria, we obtained biopsied kidney tissue, which was examined by in situ hybridization for viral detection and by NanoString for COVID-19 and acute tubular injury-associated genes. We also collected peripheral blood for APOL1 genotyping. RESULTS: This case series included six Black patients with COVID-19 (four men, two women), mean age 55 years. At biopsy day, mean serum creatinine was 6.5 mg/dl and mean urine protein-creatinine ratio was 11.5 g. Kidney biopsy specimens showed collapsing glomerulopathy, extensive foot process effacement, and focal/diffuse acute tubular injury. Three patients had endothelial reticular aggregates. We found no evidence of viral particles or SARS-CoV-2 RNA. NanoString showed elevated chemokine gene expression and changes in expression of genes associated with acute tubular injury compared with controls. All six patients had an APOL1 high-risk genotype. Five patients needed dialysis (two of whom died); one partially recovered without dialysis. CONCLUSIONS: Collapsing glomerulopathy in Black patients with COVID-19 was associated with high-risk APOL1 variants. We found no direct viral infection in the kidneys, suggesting a possible alternative mechanism: a "two-hit" combination of genetic predisposition and cytokine-mediated host response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Given this entity's resemblance with HIV-associated nephropathy, we propose the term COVID-19-associated nephropathy to describe it.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/genetics , Apolipoprotein L1/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Kidney Glomerulus/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Adult , Aged , Alleles , Biopsy , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Creatinine/blood , Female , Genotype , Humans , Kidney/pathology , Kidney Glomerulus/physiopathology , Kidney Tubules/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Risk
19.
J Clin Invest ; 130(9): 4947-4953, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611525

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDThe effects of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in pregnancy remain relatively unknown. We present a case of second trimester pregnancy with symptomatic COVID-19 complicated by severe preeclampsia and placental abruption.METHODSWe analyzed the placenta for the presence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) through molecular and immunohistochemical assays and by and electron microscopy and measured the maternal antibody response in the blood to this infection.RESULTSSARS-CoV-2 localized predominantly to syncytiotrophoblast cells at the materno-fetal interface of the placenta. Histological examination of the placenta revealed a dense macrophage infiltrate, but no evidence for the vasculopathy typically associated with preeclampsia.CONCLUSIONThis case demonstrates SARS-CoV-2 invasion of the placenta, highlighting the potential for severe morbidity among pregnant women with COVID-19.FUNDINGBeatrice Kleinberg Neuwirth Fund and Fast Grant Emergent Ventures funding from the Mercatus Center at George Mason University. The funding bodies did not have roles in the design of the study or data collection, analysis, and interpretation and played no role in writing the manuscript.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Placenta/pathology , Placenta/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/etiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Abortion, Therapeutic , Abruptio Placentae/etiology , Abruptio Placentae/pathology , Abruptio Placentae/virology , Adult , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Pandemics , Phylogeny , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pre-Eclampsia/etiology , Pre-Eclampsia/pathology , Pre-Eclampsia/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , Pregnancy Trimester, Second , RNA, Viral/genetics , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2 , Viral Load
20.
Kidney Med ; 2(4): 493-497, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548654

ABSTRACT

Collapsing glomerulopathy is an aggressive form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with diverse causes. The presence of the apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) high-risk genotype is a major risk factor for collapsing glomerulopathy in African Americans. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging pandemic with predominant respiratory manifestations. However, kidney involvement is being frequently noted and is associated with higher mortality. Currently, kidney pathology data for COVID-19 are scant and mostly come from postmortem findings. We report 2 African American patients who developed acute kidney injury and proteinuria in temporal association with COVID-19 infection. Kidney biopsy specimens showed collapsing glomerulopathy, endothelial tubuloreticular inclusions, and acute tubular injury, without evidence by electron microscopy or severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in situ hybridization of viral infection of kidney cells. Both patients had the APOL1 high-risk genotype. We propose that collapsing glomerulopathy represents a novel manifestation of COVID-19 infection, especially in people of African descent with APOL1 risk alleles.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL