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1.
BMJ Support Palliat Care ; 12(1): 81-90, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691300

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Despite the escalating public health emergency related to opioid-related deaths in Canada and the USA, opioids are essential for palliative care (PC) symptom management.Opioid safety is the prevention, identification and management of opioid-related harms. The Delphi technique was used to develop expert consensus recommendations about how to promote opioid safety in adults receiving PC in Canada and the USA. METHODS: Through a Delphi process comprised of two rounds, USA and Canadian panellists in PC, addiction and pain medicine developed expert consensus recommendations. Elected Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians (CSPCP) board members then rated how important it is for PC physicians to be aware of each consensus recommendation.They also identified high-priority research areas from the topics that did not achieve consensus in Round 2. RESULTS: The panellists (Round 1, n=23; Round 2, n=22) developed a total of 130 recommendations from the two rounds about the following six opioid-safety related domains: (1) General principles; (2) Measures for healthcare institution and PC training and clinical programmes; (3) Patient and caregiver assessments; (4) Prescribing practices; (5) Monitoring; and (6) Patients and caregiver education. Fifty-nine topics did not achieve consensus and were deemed potential areas of research. From these results, CSPCP identified 43 high-priority recommendations and 8 high-priority research areas. CONCLUSIONS: Urgent guidance about opioid safety is needed to address the opioid crisis. These consensus recommendations can promote safer opioid use, while recognising the importance of these medications for PC symptom management.


Subject(s)
Analgesics, Opioid , Palliative Medicine , Adult , Analgesics, Opioid/adverse effects , Canada , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Humans
2.
J Telemed Telecare ; : 1357633X211059688, 2021 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582817

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In addition to shifting and expanding clinical responsibilities, rapidly evolving information and guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult for health care workers (HCW) to synthesise and translate COVID-19 information into practice. This study evaluated whether a COVID-19-specific telemedicine education program (ECHO COVID) would impact health care workers' self-efficacy and satisfaction in the management of patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A prospective mixed methods parallel-design study was conducted among ECHO COVID participants using pre-post questionnaires and a focus group discussion. Questionnaire results were examined for changes in health care workers' self-efficacy and satisfaction. Focus group discussion data were analysed to explore health care workers' experience in ECHO COVID and the context of their practice during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: 239 health care workers registered in ECHO COVID and 114 (47.7%) completed questionnaires and attended at least one ECHO COVID session. Median self-efficacy scores increased from 5 (IQR 4-6) to 6 (IQR 6-6) (p < 0.0001), independent of profession, years in practice, age group, or practice environment. Participants were highly satisfied with ECHO COVID sessions with a median score of 4 (IQR 4-5). Focus group discussion data indicated that health care workers gained knowledge through ECHO COVID and revealed facilitators for ECHO COVID program success, including the transition to virtual care, the practicability of knowledge provided, and a 'perspective from the trenches.' DISCUSSION: This study demonstrated that a telemedicine education program aimed to support health care workers in managing patients with COVID-19 had a positive impact on health care workers' self-efficacy and satisfaction. This impact was specifically mediated by the ECHO COVID program.

3.
BMJ Open ; 11(10): e053124, 2021 10 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495470

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Communicable disease epidemics and pandemics magnify the health inequities experienced by marginalised populations. People who use substances suffer from high rates of morbidity and mortality and should be a priority to receive palliative care, yet they encounter many barriers to palliative care access. Given the pre-existing inequities to palliative care access for people with life-limiting illnesses who use substances, it is important to understand the impact of communicable disease epidemics and pandemics such as COVID-19 on this population. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will conduct a scoping review and report according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews reporting guidelines. We conducted a comprehensive literature search in seven bibliographical databases from the inception of each database to August 2020. We also performed a grey literature search to identify the publications not indexed in the bibliographical databases. All the searches will be rerun in April 2021 to retrieve recently published information because the COVID-19 pandemic is ongoing at the time of this writing. We will extract the quantitative data using a standardised data extraction form and summarise it using descriptive statistics. Additionally, we will conduct thematic qualitative analyses and present our findings as narrative summaries. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approval is not required for a scoping review. We will disseminate our findings to healthcare providers and policymakers through professional networks, digital communications through social media platforms, conference presentations and publication in a scientific journal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Humans , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Research Design , Review Literature as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic
4.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(5): 2501-2507, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-757234

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 was first reported in Wuhan, China, in December 2019; it rapidly spread around the world and was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020. The palliative care program at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada, provides comprehensive care to patients with advanced cancer and their families, through services including an acute palliative care unit, an inpatient consultation service, and an ambulatory palliative care clinic. In the face of a global pandemic, palliative care teams are uniquely placed to support patients with cancer who also have COVID-19. This may include managing severe symptoms such as dyspnea and agitation, as well as guiding advance care planning and goals of care conversations. In tandem, there is a need for palliative care teams to continue to provide care to patients with advanced cancer who are COVID-negative but who are at higher risk of infection and adverse outcomes related to COVID-19. This paper highlights the unique challenges faced by a palliative care team in terms of scaling up services in response to a global pandemic while simultaneously providing ongoing support to their patients with advanced cancer at a tertiary cancer center.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Canada/epidemiology , Humans , Palliative Care/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Tertiary Care Centers
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