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1.
Breathe (Sheffield, England) ; 18(2), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2101950

ABSTRACT

The European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress is an annual event where thousands of experts from around the world come together to present and discuss the latest scientific and clinical advances in the respiratory field. During the pandemic, there was a need to change the format of the Congress from in-person to an online format (2020 and 2021) to limit the exposure to the coronavirus. This year, for the first time, the ERS Congress will take place in a hybrid format, i.e. in Barcelona (Spain) and online, from 4–6 September 2022. In this article, we provide an overview on what to expect from the ERS Congress 2022, including the “top picks” of the 2022 Congress programme from the leaders of the International Congress Programme Committee and a summary of the Early Career Member (ECM) session, which this year will address the “Steps for a successful career in respiratory research”. An overview of what to expect from the European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress 2022, including the top picks of the International Congress Programme Committee and a summary of the Early Career Member session.https://bit.ly/3tNTlgY

2.
Breathe (Sheff) ; 18(2): 220064, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962730

ABSTRACT

An overview of what to expect from the European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress 2022, including the top picks of the International Congress Programme Committee and a summary of the Early Career Member session. https://bit.ly/3tNTlgY.

3.
Ann Intensive Care ; 12(1): 16, 2022 Feb 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707336

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and dyspnea of COVID-19, 2 and 12 months after an intensive care unit (ICU) stay. METHODS: Patients discharged from the ICU between April and June 2020 and subsequently transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility were assessed 2 months and 12 months after ICU admission. HRQoL was assessed by the EuroQoL EQ-5D-3L (visual analog scale and time trade-off normalized to the French population algorithm) and dyspnea was assessed by the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnea scale. RESULTS: We enrolled 94 patients. Median EQ-5D-3L time trade-off was 0.80 (interquartile range, 0.36-0.91) at 2 months and 0.91 (0.52-1.00) at 12 months (P = 0.12). EQ-5D-3L visual analog scale was 70 (60-85) at 2 months and 70 (60-85) at 12 months (P = 0.07). The mMRC dyspnea scale was 3 (2-4) at ICU discharge, 1 (0-2), P < 0.001 at 2 months and 1 (1-2) at 12 months. At 12 months, 68 (76%) patients reported at least one symptom that was not present prior to ICU admission and 27 (61%) of the 44 patients who were previously working had returned to work. On multiple linear regression, factors associated with EQ-5D-3L were body mass index on ICU admission, tracheostomy, male gender and active smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Twelve months after ICU admission for COVID-19 and subsequent rehabilitation, a substantial proportion of patients reported alterations of HRQoL, dyspnea and symptoms that were not present prior to admission and a substantial proportion of these patients had not returned to work. Factors associated with a risk of poorer 12-month quality of life, may help to identify at-risk patients.

4.
ERJ Open Res ; 8(1)2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533243

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has negatively affected the delivery of respiratory diagnostic services across the world due to the potential risk of disease transmission during lung function testing. Community prevalence, reoccurrence of COVID-19 surges and the emergence of different variants of SARS-CoV-2 have impeded attempts to restore services. Finding consensus on how to deliver safe lung function services for both patients attending and for staff performing the tests are of paramount importance. This international statement presents the consensus opinion of 23 experts in the field of lung function and respiratory physiology balanced with evidence from the reviewed literature. It describes a robust roadmap for restoration and continuity of lung function testing services during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. Important strategies presented in this consensus statement relate to the patient journey when attending for lung function tests. We discuss appointment preparation, operational and environmental issues, testing room requirements including mitigation strategies for transmission risk, requirement for improved ventilation, maintaining physical distance and use of personal protection equipment. We also provide consensus opinion on precautions relating to specific tests, filters, management of special patient groups and alternative options to testing in hospitals. The pandemic has highlighted how vulnerable lung function services are and forces us to re-think how long-term mitigation strategies can protect our services during this and any possible future pandemic. This statement aspires to address the safety concerns that exist and provide strategies to make lung function tests and the testing environment safer when tests are required.

5.
Breathe (Sheff) ; 17(3): 210065, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412898

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease caused by a new coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-​2), and the predisposing and protecting factors have not been fully elucidated. COVID-19 primarily impacts the respiratory system, and can result in mild illness or serious disease leading to critical illness requiring admission to the intensive care unit due to respiratory failure. After hospital discharge, the more commonly described pulmonary function anomalies are alterations in diffusing capacity and the loss of lung volume. Reduction of inspiratory muscle contraction may also be underestimated. This article will focus on the pathophysiology of pulmonary function anomalies in COVID-19 survivors. We will discuss current advances and provide future directions and also present our perspective on this field.

6.
Front Physiol ; 12: 628288, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314563

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a disease caused by a new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, primarily impacting the respiratory system. COVID-19 can result in mild illness or serious disease leading to critical illness and requires admission to ICU due to respiratory failure. There is intense discussion around potential factors predisposing to and protecting from COVID-19. The immune response and the abnormal respiratory function with a focus on respiratory function testing in COVID-19 patients will be at the center of this Perspective article of the Frontiers in Physiology Series on "The Tribute of Physiology for the Understanding of COVID-19 Disease." We will discuss current advances and provide future directions and present also our perspective in this field.

7.
Breathe (Sheff) ; 17(2): 210057, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286807

ABSTRACT

This article provides a brief description of the Early Career Member session and guidance on how to get the most out of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress 2021, to help attendees plan their Congress in advance. https://bit.ly/3dBNrYC.

8.
Respir Med ; 184: 106435, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230751

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Lung function in survivors of SARS-Co-V2 pneumonia is poorly known, but concern over the possibility of sequelae exists. METHODS: Retrospective study on survivors with confirmed infection and pneumonia on chest-CT. Correlations between PFT and residual radiologic anomalies at three months taking into account initial clinical and radiological severity and steroid use during acute phase. RESULTS: 137 patients (69 men, median age 59 (Q1 50; Q3 68), BMI 27.5 kg/m2 (25.1; 31.7)) were assessed. Only 32.9% had normal PFT, 75 had altered DLCO. Median (Q1; Q3) values were: VC 79 (66; 92) % pred, FEV1 81 (68; 89), TLC 78 (67; 85), DLCO 60 (44; 72), and KCO 89 (77; 105). Ground glass opacities (GGO) were present in 103 patients (75%), reticulations in 42 (30%), and fibrosis in 18 (13%). There were significantly lower FEV1 (p = 0.0089), FVC (p = 0.0010), TLC (p < 0.0001) and DLCO (p < 0.0001) for patients with GGO, lower TLC (p = 0.0913) and DLCO (p = 0.0181) between patients with reticulations and lower FVC (p = 0.0618), TLC (p = 0.0742) DLCO (p = 0.002) and KCO (p = 0.0114) between patients with fibrosis. Patients with initial ≥50% lung involvement had significantly lower FEV1 (p = 0.0019), FVC (p = 0.0033), TLC (p = 0.0028) and DLCO (p = 0.0003) compared to patients with ≤10%. There was no difference in PFT and residual CT lesions between patients who received steroids and those who did not. CONCLUSION: The majority of patients have altered PFT at three months, even in patients with mild initial disease, with significantly lower function in patients with residual CT lesions. Steroids do not seem to modify functional and radiological recovery. Long-term follow-up is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/physiopathology , Forced Expiratory Volume , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Vital Capacity , Female , Humans , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Radiography, Thoracic , Respiratory Function Tests , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
9.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(3)2021 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158368

ABSTRACT

The cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) provides an objective assessment of ventilatory limitation, related to the exercise minute ventilation (VE) coupled to carbon dioxide output (VCO2) (VE/VCO2); high values of VE/VCO2 slope define an exercise ventilatory inefficiency (EVin). In subjects recovered from hospitalised COVID-19, we explored the methodology of CPET in order to evaluate the presence of cardiopulmonary alterations. Our prospective study (RESPICOVID) has been proposed to evaluate pulmonary damage's clinical impact in post-COVID subjects. In a subgroup of subjects (RESPICOVID2) without baseline confounders, we performed the CPET. According to the VE/VCO2 slope, subjects were divided into having EVin and exercise ventilatory efficiency (EVef). Data concerning general variables, hospitalisation, lung function, and gas-analysis were also collected. The RESPICOVID2 enrolled 28 subjects, of whom 8 (29%) had EVin. As compared to subjects with EVef, subjects with EVin showed a reduction in heart rate (HR) recovery. VE/VCO2 slope was inversely correlated with HR recovery; this correlation was confirmed in a subgroup of older, non-smoking male subjects, regardless of the presence of arterial hypertension. More than one-fourth of subjects recovered from hospitalised COVID-19 have EVin. The relationship between EVin and HR recovery may represent a novel hallmark of post-COVID cardiopulmonary alterations.

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