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1.
Int J Equity Health ; 21(1):174, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2153594

ABSTRACT

Over the years, the Nigerian healthcare workforce, including doctors, nurses, and pharmacists have always been known to emigrate to developed countries to practice. However, the recent dramatic increase in this trend is worrisome. There has been a mass emigration of Nigerian healthcare workers to developed countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. While the push factors have been found to include the inadequate provision of personal protective equipment, low monthly hazard allowance, and inconsistent payment of COVID-19 inducement allowance on top of worsening insecurity, the pull factors are higher salaries as well as a safe and healthy working environment. We also discuss how healthcare workers can be retained in Nigeria through increment in remunerations and prompt payment of allowances, and how the brain drain can be turned into a brain gain via the use of electronic data collection tools for Nigerian health workers abroad, implementation of the Bhagwati's tax system, and establishment of a global skill partnership with developed countries.

2.
PLoS Global Public Health ; 2(7), 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2021485

ABSTRACT

Therapeutic efficacy in COVID-19 is dependent upon disease severity (treatment effect heterogeneity). Unfortunately, definitions of severity vary widely. This compromises the meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and the therapeutic guidelines derived from them. The World Health Organisation 'living' guidelines for the treatment of COVID-19 are based on a network meta-analysis (NMA) of published RCTs. We reviewed the 81 studies included in the WHO COVID-19 living NMA and compared their severity classifications with the severity classifications employed by the international COVID-NMA initiative. The two were concordant in only 35% (24/68) of trials. Of the RCTs evaluated, 69% (55/77) were considered by the WHO group to include patients with a range of severities (12 mild-moderate;3 mild-severe;18 mild-critical;5 moderate-severe;8 moderate-critical;10 severe-critical), but the distribution of disease severities within these groups usually could not be determined, and data on the duration of illness and/or oxygen saturation values were often missing. Where severity classifications were clear there was substantial overlap in mortality across trials in different severity strata. This imprecision in severity assessment compromises the validity of some therapeutic recommendations;notably extrapolation of "lack of therapeutic benefit" shown in hospitalised severely ill patients on respiratory support to ambulant mildly ill patients is not warranted. Both harmonised unambiguous definitions of severity and individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses are needed to guide and improve therapeutic recommendations in COVID-19. Achieving this goal will require improved coordination of the main stakeholders developing treatment guidelines and medicine regulatory agencies. Open science, including prompt data sharing, should become the standard to allow IPD meta-analyses.

3.
Journal of Governance and Regulation ; 11(1):45-54, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1716361

ABSTRACT

This paper investigates the influence of accounting information systems (AIS) on firms’ performance during the COVID-19 pandemic and how they help enhance employees’ performance and the external auditing process. This paper is qualitative in nature using the inductive approach. In-depth primary data were gathered through semi-structured interviews conducted in the year 2020. Due to the pandemic, the interviews with ten auditors were done online through the Zoom software application. The empirical findings of this paper show a positive impact of AIS on firms’ performance and a more significant influence on employees’ performance and the auditing process. AIS reduces costs and human errors, eases operations, speeds up work tasks, and increases employees’ productivity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings also show that there is no direct impact on firms’ overall cash flow/revenues. This paper increases our understanding of how AIS can influence and improve firms’ performance and the significance of implementation factors such as training. It provides practical guidelines for regulators and managers to utilize accounting information systems to perform better. © 2022 The Authors.

4.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-12, 2020.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-990352

ABSTRACT

We examine the differential effect of gender, marital status, ethnicity, religion, education and employment status on mental health indicators (successful coping, stress & self-esteem) during COVID-19 lockdown in Nigeria. Applying a cross sectional approach, we administered an anonymised online questionnaire to select 353 individuals (mean age = 34.84, SD = 11.19) from 17 April to 24 May 2020. Married individuals coped better, were less stressed and reported high self-esteem. Christians were less stressed and have high self-esteem. Yoruba ethnic group coped better and were high in self-esteem, while Igbo ethnic group was less stressed. Also, postgraduate degree holders coped well;secondary education holders were highly stressed;while first degree holders were high in self-esteem. Self-employed respondents successfully coped, while the unemployed were high in stress and low in self-esteem. Marital status and employment status directly and interactively affected overall mental health. Officially employed persons reported higher self-esteem and less stress. Married females, single males and self-employed males coped better, while self-employed singles recorded highest stress. No gender difference was observed in mental health indicators. The degree of differences in Nigerians' mental health indicators according to socio-demographics and the importance in improving mental health during and post COVID-19 pandemic are highlighted.

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