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1.
Frontiers in Marine Science ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2080160

ABSTRACT

Reduced amounts of aerosols blowing into the Yellow Sea (YS), owing to the temporary lockdown of factories in China during COVID-19, resulted in a 15% decrease in spring chlorophyll-a concentration (CHL) in March 2020 compared to its mean March values from 2003 to 2021. Particularly, the effect of land-based AOD is insignificant compared with that of atmospheric aerosols flowing into the YS, as indicated by the currents and wind directions. Hence, the main objective of this study was to understand the relationship between atmospheric aerosols and CHL by quantitatively considering relevant environmental changes using a Random Forest (RF) algorithm. Various input physical forcing variables to RF were employed, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), sea surface temperature (SST), mixed layer depth (MLD), wind divergence (WD), and total precipitation (TP). From the RF-based analysis, we estimated the relative contribution of each physical forcing variable to the difference in CHL during and after the COVID-19 lockdown period. The sensitivity of the RF model to changes in aerosol levels indicated positive effects of increased amounts of aerosols during spring blooms. Additionally, we calculated the quantitative contribution of aerosols to CHL changes. When SST was warmer and TP was lower than their climatology in March 2020, CHL increased by 0.22 mg m-3 and 0.02 mg m-3, respectively. Conversely, when MLD became shallower and AOD was lower than their climatology, CHL decreased as much as 0.01 mg m-3 and 0.20 mg m-3. Variations in WD caused no significant change in CHL. Overall, the specific estimations for reduced spring blooms were caused by a reduction in aerosols during the COVID-19 lockdown period. Furthermore, the RF developed in this study can be used to examine CHL changes and the relative role of significant environmental changes in biological blooms in the ocean for any normal year. Copyright © 2022 Baek, Park, Kim, Lee, Lee, Lee and Jo.

2.
Social Work Inhealth Emergencies: Global Perspectives ; : 216-232, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2066952

ABSTRACT

More than 70 million people globally are forced to migrate for reasons such as armed conflict, persecution (political, cultural, religious, or sexual orientation), natural disasters, development projects, and human trafficking. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the precariousness of these vulnerable populations. In this chapter, we explore the different groups that comprise people on the move and examine the impact of COVID-19 and other health crises on these populations. The role of social work at the intersection of the pandemic and forced migration and broader implications for the social work profession are examined through five case studies. © 2022 selection and editorial matter, Patricia Fronek and Karen Smith Rotabi-Casares;individual chapters, the contributors.

3.
International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2063174

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper links supply chain risk management to medicine supply chains to explore the role of policymakers in employing supply chain risk management strategies (SCRMS) to reduce generic medicine shortages. Design/methodology/approach: Using secondary data supplemented with primary data, the authors map and compare seven countries' SCRMS for handling shortage risks in their paracetamol supply chains before and during the first two waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings: Consistent with recent research, the study finds that policymakers had implemented few SCRMS specifically for responding to disruptions caused by COVID-19. However, shortages were largely avoided since multiple strategies for coping with business-as-usual disruptions had been implemented prior to the pandemic. The authors did find that SCRMS implemented during COVID-19 were not always aligned with those implemented pre-pandemic. The authors also found that policymakers played both direct and indirect roles. Research limitations/implications: Combining longitudinal secondary data with interviews sheds light on how, regardless of the level of preparedness during normal times, SCRMS can be leveraged to avert shortages in abnormal times. However, the problem is highly complex, which warrants further research. Practical implications: Supply chain professionals and policymakers in the healthcare sector can use the findings when developing preparedness and response plans. Social implications: The insights developed can help policymakers improve the availability of high-volume generic medicines in (ab)normal times. Originality/value: The authors contribute to prior SCRM research in two ways. First, the authors operationalize SCRMS in the medicine supply chain context in (ab)normal times, thereby opening avenues for future research on SCRM in this context. Second, the authors develop insights on the role policymakers play and how they directly implement and indirectly influence the adoption of SCRMS. Based on the study findings, the authors develop a framework that captures the diverse roles of policymakers in SCRM. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

4.
Cancer Research ; 82(12), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1986485

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Despite the development of two mRNA vaccines, there is an urgent unmet need of finding new antiviral strategies. One such potential antiviral strategy is to target the synthetic lethal (SL) partners of transcriptionally altered genes in infected host cells, thereby selectively killing them to halt the infection at its heels (Mast FD, JCB, 2020). Methods: Here we conduct a first proof-of-concept SL inference approach to predict anti-SARS-CoV-2 targets in a systematic genome-wide manner. This effort capitalizes on our recently published pipeline for inferring clinically relevant SL interactions in cancer (Lee et al, Cell, 2021). Based on the latter, we comprehensively analyzed multiple in vitro and in vivo bulk and single-cell RNA-sequencing datasets of SARS-CoV-2 infection to predict candidate antiviral targets that are SL with altered host genes. Importantly, as our predictions are fine-tuned based on the analysis of patients' data, they are more likely to be of translational value. Results: Our key results are twofold:1) The predicted SL-based targets are highly enriched for genes that are reported in four SARS-CoV-2 CRISPR-Cas9 genome-wide genetic screens to inhibit growth of infected cells. 2) A subset of top predicted 26 genes were experimentally tested in a targeted siRNA screen conducted in both infected and non-infected human Caco-2 cells. Remarkably, as expected given that these targets were predicted to be SL specific with genes upregulated in infected cells, indeed, knocking down these targets reduced viral replication and cell viability only under the infected condition without harming non-infected cells. Conclusion: In summary, this study is the first to demonstrate the potential of a synthetic lethality approach to identify viral (specifically anti-SARS-CoV-2) targets. Importantly, as both single cell and bulk transcriptomics patients' data is considered from both infected people and controls, they are more likely to be of clinical relevance. Targeting host genes identified via an SL-based approach is probably more suitable when the infection is at the early stage and host can still tolerate the loss of infected host cells.

5.
Composites Research ; 35(3):216-221, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1979609

ABSTRACT

Recently, the worldwide demand for disposable masks has increased due to COVID-19 infections and severe air pollution. Personal masks should reduce breathe resistance while maintaining filtering performance. In this study, a solution blowing process is used to produce composite nanofiber filters to co-spin two polymers at once. The manufacture process of the various fiber diameter filter was designed, and the filtration performance and differential pressure of the prepared filter was investigated. Poly vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) and Polylactic acid (PLA) fibers were chosen to be entangled together in a layer with a diameter of 1.05 mu m and 0.33 mu m. Composite nanofilters showed up to 87% filtration efficiency and 32 Pa differential pressure.

6.
Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes ; 15, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1938110

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To determine the costs and trends of telehealth utilization before and during the COVID-19 pandemic for patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Methods: We calculated the proportions of patients with CVD who used telehealth before (January 2019-February 2020) and during (March 2020-April 2021) the pandemic using MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters. We compared the trends of telehealth utilization among CVD patients by sex, age, claim type, payment plan, and rural/urban status. We calculated mean, SD, median, and IQR of total and average telehealth costs. Results: The results show that telehealth utilization spiked in March 2020 and further rapidly increased and peaked in April 2020. Telehealth utilization increased from 0.021% in March 2019 to 6.7% in March 2020 and from 0.024% in April 2019 to 39.8% in April 2020. After peaking in April 2020, telehealth utilization rapidly fell in May-June 2020 and then gradually decreased before rebounding in October-December 2020. It resumed the decline through April 2021 remained much higher than the prepandemic level. Telehealth utilization was higher during the pandemic for females than males;for younger age groups (aged 18-44 or 45-64) than older age group (aged 65+);for commercial claims than Medicare supplemental insurance;for capitated insurance plans than non-capitated insurance plans;and for patients in urban areas than rural areas. From March 2020-February 2021, the mean (SD) telehealth cost per visit was $115.7 (66) (median [IQR], $104.8 [$75.8-$139.4]), with patient out-of-pocket cost $25.5 (42.8) (median [IQR], $10 [$0-$30]), insurance cost $90.4 (71.0) (median [IQR], $83 [$45.3-$121.3]), and the mean (SD) number of telehealth utilizations per patient was 1.67 (1.8) (median [IQR], 1 [1-2]). Conclusions: Policymakers, health care practitioners, and insurance companies should be aware of trends and costs of telehealth utilization among patients with CVD. Our results show that telehealth would facilitate better management of CVD. Our results may inform future policies and practices to meet the increased demand for telehealth.

7.
9th International Conference on Learning and Collaboration Technologies, LCT 2022 Held as Part of the 24th HCI International Conference, HCII 2022 ; 13329 LNCS:158-175, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1919644

ABSTRACT

Due to the recent Covid-19 pandemic, we have seen a considerable shift to online education. The pandemic prompted many academic institutions to quickly develop virtual courses and improve pre-existing online courses to deal with the drastic increase of online students. However, the process of creating virtual courses remains largely tedious. With technological advancement, institutions can now offer personalized virtual courses for individual students by automating course content creation. Computer-generated course content can be easily customized to meet individual student needs. This study examines the potential problems associated with virtual learning and evaluates the feasibility of employing computer-generated course content. It also analyzes the influence avatar teachers have on student learning and engagement as a first step in determining the impact of computer-generated courses. The study shows that institutions should ensure video lectures are well designed and utilize an appropriate teacher voice. The study reports mixed feedback from an interview study that explores the impact of human and avatar teachers’ physical characteristics on student learning. Some students believed that the avatar teachers were engaging, while some found it distracting. On the other hand, some students did not feel that the teacher’s physical characteristics impacted their learning as long as the course material was delivered well. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

8.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(11): 4082-4091, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1904135

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on weight gain in children and adolescents remains unknown. We aimed to identify an estimated 15-year trend in mean body mass index (BMI) changes and prevalence of obesity and overweight among Korean adolescents from 2005 to 2020, including the period of the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data taken from a nationwide survey (Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey), between 2005 and 2020. Representative samples of one million Korean adolescents aged 13-18 years (n=1,057,885) were examined. The 15-year trends in mean BMI and proportion of obesity or overweight, and the changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic were analyzed. RESULTS: The data of 1,057,885 Korean adolescents were analyzed (mean age: 14.98 years; females, 48.4%). The estimated weighted mean BMI was 20.5 kg/m2 [95% confidence interval (CI), 20.4-20.5] from 2005 to 2008 and 21.5 kg/m2 (95% CI, 21.4-21.6) in 2020 (during the COVID-19 pandemic). Although the 15-year trend of mean BMI gradually increased, the change in mean BMI before and during the pandemic significantly lessened (ßdiff, -0.027; 95% CI, -0.028 to -0.026). The 15-year (2005-2020) trend changes in the prevalence of obesity and overweight were similar (obesity prevalence from 2005-2008, 3.2%; 95% CI, 3.1-3.3 vs. obesity prevalence in 2020, 8.6%; 95% CI, 8.2-9.0; ßdiff, -0.309; 95% CI, -0.330 to -0.288). CONCLUSIONS: The 15-year trend of overall mean BMI and obesity and overweight prevalence demonstrated a significant increase; however, its slope decreased during the pandemic. These landmark results suggest the need for the development of precise strategies to prevent pediatric obesity and overweight during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatric Obesity , Adolescent , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Overweight/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
9.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 30(1 SUPPL):74, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1880371

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 plasma RNAemia correlates strongly with COVID-19 severity and predicts clinical outcome, but how RNAemia levels relate to viral load in the lower respiratory tract has not been well-defined. Delineating the relationship of viral load in the lung and blood compartments in COVID-19 may help guide therapeutic interventions and could provide insight into the viral dynamics of these two compartments. Here we compared SARS-CoV-2 RNA levels in plasma to those in lower respiratory secretions. Methods: We used an internally-controlled, ultrasensitive (1 copy/extraction) qRT-PCR assay for SARS-CoV-2 N gene RNA to test plasma and endotracheal aspirate (ETA) samples collected on the same day from mechanically-ventilated patients with COVID-19 prospectively enrolled from three hospitals in Pittsburgh. Samples were collected at enrollment on day 1 (D1), D5, and D10. Results: SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected in 22/33 (67%) plasma (median 32 cps/mL, IQR [<3-2608 cps/mL]) and 28/33 (85%) ETA samples (median 66,300 cps/mL, IQR [2395-1,028,500 cps/mL]) collected on D1. Of the 28 ETA samples with detectable SARS-CoV-2 RNA, 22 (79%) had detectable RNAemia. Viral RNA levels were more than 2,000-fold higher in ETA than plasma, but plasma and ETA viral RNA levels were strongly correlated (Spearman r=0.83, p<0.0001, Fig 1A). Viral RNA levels generally decreased concordantly over time in both plasma and ETA samples (Fig 1B and C). Conclusion: SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA levels in plasma and lower respiratory tract secretions are strongly correlated in patients with severe COVID-19. This finding provides support for plasma viral RNA as a biomarker of lung infection, which could prove to be useful in guiding therapeutic interventions and monitoring response to therapies.

11.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-333809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent efforts have identified genetic loci that are associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection rates and disease outcome severity. Translating these genetic findings into druggable genes and readily available compounds that reduce COVID-19 host susceptibility is a critical next step. METHODS: We integrate COVID-19 genetic susceptibility variants, multi-tissue genetically regulated gene expression (GReX) and perturbargen signatures to identify candidate genes and compounds that reverse the predicted gene expression dysregulation associated with COVID-19 susceptibility. The top candidate gene is validated by testing both its GReX and observed blood transcriptome association with COVID-19 severity, as well as by in vitro perturbation to quantify effects on viral load and molecular pathway dysregulation. We validate the in silico drug repositioning analysis by examining whether the top candidate compounds decrease COVID-19 incidence based on epidemiological evidence. RESULTS: We identify IL10RB as the top key regulator of COVID-19 host susceptibility. Predicted GReX up-regulation of IL10RB and higher IL10RB expression in COVID-19 patient blood is associated with worse COVID-19 outcomes. In vitro IL10RB overexpression is associated with increased viral load and activation of immune-related molecular pathways. Azathioprine and retinol are prioritized as candidate compounds to reduce the likelihood of testing positive for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: We establish an integrative data-driven approach for gene target prioritization. We identify and validate IL10RB as a suitable molecular target for modulation of COVID-19 host susceptibility. Finally, we provide evidence for a few readily available medications that would warrant further investigation as drug repositioning candidates.

12.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-329479

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the dearth of approved drugs to treat viral infections, with only ~90 FDA approved drugs against human viral pathogens. To identify drugs that can block SARS-CoV-2 replication, extensive drug screening to repurpose approved drugs is underway. Here, we screened ~18,000 drugs for antiviral activity using live virus infection in human respiratory cells. Dose-response studies validate 122 drugs with antiviral activity and selectivity against SARS-CoV-2. Amongst these drug candidates are 16 nucleoside analogs, the largest category of clinically used antivirals. This included the antiviral Remdesivir approved for use in COVID-19, and the nucleoside Molnupirivir, which is undergoing clinical trials. RNA viruses rely on a high supply of nucleoside triphosphates from the host to efficiently replicate, and we identified a panel of host nucleoside biosynthesis inhibitors as antiviral, and we found that combining pyrimidine biosynthesis inhibitors with antiviral nucleoside analogs synergistically inhibits SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro and in vivo suggesting a clinical path forward.

13.
Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy ; : 18, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1680240

ABSTRACT

Using administrative data from Georgia covering January 2018-August 2020, we estimated the effect of services provided through the Older Americans Act (OAA) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) on food insecurity among older Georgians. Our sample included those who received services prior to and during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. For the entire sample period, we found home-delivered meals and other OAA services reduced food insecurity by 3% and 4%, respectively. During COVID-19, the effect of SNAP on reducing food insecurity significantly increased from 2.1% to 4.7%, while the loss of "traditional" congregate meals services increased food insecurity by 7%.

14.
PUBMED; 2021.
Preprint in English | PUBMED | ID: ppcovidwho-293399

ABSTRACT

Novel strategies are needed to identify drug targets and treatments for the COVID-19 pandemic. The altered gene expression of virus-infected host cells provides an opportunity to specifically inhibit viral propagation via targeting the synthetic lethal (SL) partners of such altered host genes. Pursuing this antiviral strategy, here we comprehensively analyzed multiple in vitro and in vivo bulk and single-cell RNA-sequencing datasets of SARS-CoV-2 infection to predict clinically relevant candidate antiviral targets that are SL with altered host genes. The predicted SL-based targets are highly enriched for infected cell inhibiting genes reported in four SARS-CoV-2 CRISPR-Cas9 genome-wide genetic screens. Integrating our predictions with the results of these screens, we further selected a focused subset of 26 genes that we experimentally tested in a targeted siRNA screen using human Caco-2 cells. Notably, as predicted, knocking down these targets reduced viral replication and cell viability only under the infected condition without harming non-infected cells. Our results are made publicly available, to facilitate their in vivo testing and further validation.

15.
PUBMED; 2021.
Preprint in English | PUBMED | ID: ppcovidwho-292837

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic, and the recent rise and widespread transmission of SARS-CoV-2 Variants of Concern (VOCs), have demonstrated the need for ubiquitous nucleic acid testing outside of centralized clinical laboratories. Here, we develop SHINEv2, a Cas13-based nucleic acid diagnostic that combines quick and ambient temperature sample processing and lyophilized reagents to greatly simplify the test procedure and assay distribution. We benchmarked a SHINEv2 assay for SARS-CoV-2 detection against state-of-the-art antigen-capture tests using 96 patient samples, demonstrating 50-fold greater sensitivity and 100% specificity. We designed SHINEv2 assays for discriminating the Alpha, Beta, Gamma and Delta VOCs, which can be read out visually using lateral flow technology. We further demonstrate that our assays can be performed without any equipment in less than 90 minutes. SHINEv2 represents an important advance towards rapid nucleic acid tests that can be performed in any location.

17.
Annals of Oncology ; 32:S597, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1432843

ABSTRACT

Background: Combining anti-VEGF/Ang2 and anti-PD-1 therapy promotes an immunopermissive state, supportive of T-cell-mediated tumour cell destruction. This phase Ib study is assessing BI 836880 plus ezabenlimab in patients (pts) with advanced solid tumours. In Part 1 (dose escalation in pts with advanced NSCLC), the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) was determined as BI 836880 720 mg + ezabenlimab 240 mg IV q3w. Here, we report updated results, including data from Part 2 (expansion cohorts). Methods: Part 2 has 7 cohorts: metastatic (m) NSCLC after checkpoint inhibitor (CPI) monotherapy (Cohort A);mNSCLC after chemotherapy (CT) + CPI (Cohort B);mSCLC after CT ± CPI (Cohort C);recurrent GBM (1st and 2nd recurrence;Cohort D);immunotherapy-resistant m-melanoma (Cohort E);HCC after prior sorafenib or lenvatinib (Cohort F);and previously untreated unresectable HCC (Cohort G). Primary endpoint is objective response rate (complete response [CR] + partial response [PR]). Results: As of March 2021, 215 pts have been treated (Part 1: 14, Part 2: 201 [Cohort A, 35;B, 32;C, 19;D, 31;E, 32;F, 29;G, 23];70% male, median age 62 yrs). Any and ≥G3 AEs (any-cause) were reported in 183 (85%) and 72 (33%) pts. 118 (55%) pts had drug-related AEs, most commonly asthenia (13%) and hypertension (12%). 7 pts had G4 AEs (non-related hyperkalaemia + cardiac arrest, laryngospasm, gastrointestinal perforation;drug-related anaphylactic reaction, cholestatic hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, increased transaminases);9 pts had G5 AEs (non-related COVID-19 pneumonia, epilepsy, intracranial haemorrhage, cardio-respiratory arrest, haemoptysis, hepatic failure, general physical health deterioration, Glasgow coma scale abnormal + shortness of breath;drug-related tracheal haemorrhage). 35 (16%) pts had immune-related AEs and 15 (7%) had AEs leading to discontinuation. 179 pts were evaluable for response: 1 had confirmed CR (Cohort F), 22 had PR (Part 1: 2;Part 2: 20 [Cohort A, 4;C, 5;D, 4;E, 3;F, 3;G, 1]) and 110 had stable disease. 106 pts remain on treatment. Conclusions: BI 836880 plus ezabenlimab had a manageable safety profile, with preliminary activity in a range of tumour types. Clinical trial identification: NCT03468426. Editorial acknowledgement: Medical writing support for the development of this manuscript, under the direction of the authors, was provided by Hannah Simmons MSc, of Ashfield MedComms, an Ashfield Health company, and funded by Boehringer Ingelheim. Legal entity responsible for the study: Boehringer Ingelheim. Funding: Boehringer Ingelheim. Disclosure: N. Girard: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Roche, Eli Lilly, Boehringer Ingelheim, AstraZeneca, Novartis, Pfizer, BMS, MSD, Takeda, GSK, AbbVie, Pharmamar, Janssen, Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Funding, Travel/accommodation/expenses: Roche, AstraZeneca, BMS MSD Oncology;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Roche, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim. M. Wermke: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: MSD, Novartis, Kite, Heidelberg Pharma, Roche, Boehringer Ingelheim;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: BMS, Merck, Roche, Novartis, Kite, Boehringer Ingelheim, AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Funding, Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Glenmark, BMS, AstraZeneca. E. Ledin: Financial Interests, Personal and Institutional, Research Grant: Boehringer Ingelheim. D. Kim: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service, Korea;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Korean Association for Lung Cancer, Korean Cancer Association, Korean Society of Medical Oncology, Taiwan Lung Cancer Society;Financial Interests, Institutional, Principal Investigator, Clinical Trial Funding: Alpha Biopharma, Amgen, AstraZeneca/Medimmune, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Bridge BioTherapeutics, Chong Keun Dang, Daiich-Sankyo, GSK, Hanmi, Janssen, Merus, MIrati Therapeutics, MSD, Novartis, ONO Pharmaceutical, Pfizer, Roche/Genentech, Takeda, TP Therapeuti;Non-Financial Interests, Person l, Advisory Role: Amgen, AstraZeneca, BMS / ONO Pharmaceuticals, Daiich-Sankyo, GSK, Janssen, Pfizer, SK Biopharm, Takeda, Yuhan;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Member of the Board of Directors: Asian Thoracic Oncology Research Group, Korean Association for Lung Cancer, Korean Cancer Association, Korean Society of Medical Oncology;Other, Personal, Funding, Travel support for advisory board meeting attendance: Amgen, Daiichi-Sankyo. J. Bennouna: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Bristol Myers Squibb, MSD, AstraZeneca, Roche, Servier, Bayer, AMGEN;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Bristol Myers Squibb, MSD, AstraZeneca, Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: AstraZeneca. T. Lesimple: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: MSD, Novartis, BMS, Pierre Fabre;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: MSD, Novartis;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Roche. E. Felip: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: BAYER;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Beigene;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Boehringer-Ingelheim;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Eli Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: F. Hoffman-La Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Glaxo Smith Kline;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Janssen;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Medical Trends;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck Sharp & Dohme;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Merck Serono;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Peptomyc;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Puma;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Regeneron;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Sanofi;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Syneos Health;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Takeda;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Amgen;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Eli Lilly;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: F. Hoffmann-La Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Janssen;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Medscape;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Merck Sharp & Dohme;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Merck Serono;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Peervoice;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Springer;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Touch Medical;Financial Interests, Personal, Member, Independent Member of the Board: Grífols. D. Berz: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Oncocyte;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Sun Pharma;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Caris;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Takeda;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Natera;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Jazz Pharma;Other, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Genentech;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Oncocyte;Other, Personal, Advisory Role: Sun Pharma;Other, Personal, Advisory Role: Biocept;Other, Personal, Advisory Role: Prelude;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Oncocyte;Other, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Caris;Other, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Sun Pharma;Other, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: AstraZeneca;Other, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Takeda;Other, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Merck;Other, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Natera;Other, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Jazz Pharma. C. Mascaux: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Astr Zeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Kephren;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Kephren;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Bristol-Myers Squibb;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: MSD;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: Pfizer;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel, accommodations, expenses: Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel, accommodations, expenses: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel, accommodations, expenses: Boehringer Ingelheim;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, travel, accommodations, expenses: Takeda. M. Voskoboynik: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: AstraZeneca. H.T. Landsteiner: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Boehringer Ingelheim. V. Chen: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Boehringer Ingelheim. G. Jayadeva: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: Boehringer Ingelheim. J. Alt: Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Honoraria: AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, BMS, Pfizer, Roche, Takeda;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, BMS, Roche;Financial Interests, Personal, Funding, Travel/accommodation/expenses: AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, BMS. B. Hackanson: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Boehringer Ingelheim, MSD, AstraZeneca, BMS. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

19.
8th International Conference on Learning and Collaboration Technologies, LCT 2021, held as Part of the 23rd International Conference, HCI International 2021 ; 12784 LNCS:488-506, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1359852

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic had wide-reaching effects on the education system. The general response of schools and universities was to shut down non-essential campus operations, as learning and instruction became remote. The switch to remote learning protected against the spread of Covid-19, but it also had secondary effects, like the closure of university labs and libraries. This study seeks to understand if students and faculty had the tools and workspace conditions to continue to teach and learn effectively. The sudden switch to remote learning had the most significant impact on participants whose home environment does not provide for a private workspace. There was a clear trend to engage less. Participants overall find video lectures less engaging. Some participants struggle learning materials. Others changed their approach to academic learning to rely more on self-learning. © 2021, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

20.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 39(15 SUPPL), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1339196

ABSTRACT

Background: In preclinical studies, the combination of anti-VEGF/Ang2 and anti-PD-1 therapy has been shown to promote an immunopermissive state, which is supportive of T-cell-mediated tumor cell destruction. BI 836880 is a humanized bispecific nanobody that targets VEGF and Ang2, and ezabenlimab (BI 754091) is an anti-PD-1 antibody. Phase I studies investigating each as monotherapies have reported safety and preliminary antitumor activity. This ongoing Phase Ib study is evaluating the combination of BI 836880 and ezabenlimab in pts with advanced solid tumors. In Part 1 (dose escalation), the combination was feasible in pts with advanced NSCLC, with a recommended Phase II dose (RP2D) of BI 836880 720 mg + ezabenlimab 240 mg IV q3w. Here, we report updated results from Part 2 (expansion phase), which is assessing the antitumor activity and safety of the RP2D. Methods: Seven cohorts are currently recruiting pts in Part 2: metastatic (m) NSCLC after checkpoint inhibitor (CPI) monotherapy (Cohort A);mNSCLC after chemotherapy (CT) + CPI (Cohort B);mSCLC after CT ± CPI (Cohort C);1 and 2nd recurrences of glioblastoma (GBM;Cohort D);immunotherapy-resistant mmelanoma (Cohort E);hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after prior sorafenib or lenvatinib ± CPI (Cohort F);and previously untreated/unresectable HCC (Cohort G). Primary endpoint is objective response rate (complete response + partial response [PR]). Results: As of January 2021, 196 pts have received BI 836880 plus ezabenlimab (14 in Part 1, 182 in Part 2 [Cohort A, 26;B, 30;C, 19;D, 31;E, 32;F, 28;G, 16]). 134 (68%) pts were male, median age was 63 years and 102 (52%) had prior CPI use. Any grade and ≥G3 adverse events (AEs;any cause) were reported by 160 (82%) and 62 (32%) pts, most commonly (all%/ ≥G3%) hypertension (20/8), asthenia (20/3), diarrhea, decreased appetite, and nausea (all 11/1). 95 (48%) pts had a drug-related AE, most commonly hypertension and asthenia (both 11%). 6 pts had a G4 AE (non-related: hyperkalemia + cardiac arrest, laryngospasm, gastrointestinal perforation;drug-related: anaphylactic reaction, acute pancreatitis, transaminases increased);8 pts had a G5 AE (non-related: general physical health deterioration, epilepsy, hemoptysis, cardiorespiratory arrest, hepatic failure, intracranial hemorrhage, COVID-19 pneumonia;drugrelated tracheal hemorrhage). 30 (15%) pts had immune-related AEs (3% ≥G3), including hypothyroidism (3%). 11 (6%) pts had an AE leading to discontinuation. Overall, 145 pts were evaluable for response: 9 pts achieved confirmed PR (2 pts in Part 1 and 7 in Part 2 [NSCLC, n = 3;SCLC, n = 1;GBM, n = 1;melanoma, n = 1;and 2 -line HCC, n = 1]), 87 pts had stable disease and 49 pts had progressive disease. 111 pts remain on treatment. Conclusions: BI 836880 plus ezabenlimab had a manageable safety profile. The combination showed preliminary antitumor activity in a range of tumor types.

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