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1.
Int J Dermatol ; 2022 Jul 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1932473
2.
Diabetes ; 71, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1923949

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-pandemic accelerated adoption of telemedicine for diabetes care in 2020. We sought to describe the utilization of telemedicine across the T1DX-QI in 2021. Methods: Twenty four pediatric and nine adult clinics completed a survey about the proportion of televisits performed, center goals and processes in fall of 2021. Results: The majority of clinics reported performing between 11-25% (n=16, 48%) and 0-10% televisits (n=9, 27%) . The majority reported a pre-visit preparation workflow (n=24, 73%) , but most sites reported not having a staff member dedicated to supporting televisits (n=21, 64%) . No major differences in televisit use, goals, and processes were observed between pediatric and adult sites. For diabetes technology data downloads, the majority of clinics integrated data automatically into the EHR (n=25, 73%) . The major barriers to sustaining telemedicine practice across clinics were patient internet access, patient health disparities and access to device data (Figure 1) . Conclusion: More than one year into the pandemic the proportion of televisits performed by the T1DX-QI collaborative is modest. Clinic workflows have been implemented to support telemedicine but insufficient institutional support and technology barriers still represent an obstacle.

3.
J Pediatr Psychol ; 47(8): 873-882, 2022 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860877

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic increased economic, social, and health stressors for families, yet its impacts on families of youth with chronic conditions, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), are not well understood. Self-regulation (SR)-or the capacities to control emotions, cognition, and behavior in response to challenge-is known to support T1D management and coping in the face of stress. Strong SR may have protected youth with T1D from the impacts of pandemic-related stressors. This study compared youth and parent emotional functioning and T1D management before and after the pandemic's onset in relation to family pandemic-related stress and youth SR. METHODS: Parents of youth with T1D (N = 88) and a subset of these youth (N = 43; Mean age 15.3 years [SD 2.2]) completed surveys regarding SR, stress, emotional functioning, and T1D-related functioning prior to and after March 2020. Outcomes were compared using mixed effects models adjusting for covariates. Family pandemic-related stress experiences and youth SR were tested as moderators of change. RESULTS: Parents' responsibility for T1D management increased across pandemic onset and their diabetes-related distress decreased. Family pandemic-related stress was associated with decreased emotional functioning over time. Youth SR, particularly emotional and behavioral aspects, predicted better emotional and T1D-related functioning. DISCUSSION: While youth with T1D whose families experienced higher pandemic-related stress had poorer adjustment, strong emotional and behavioral SR appeared to protect against worsening youth mood and adherence across pandemic onset. Both social-contextual and individual factors are important to consider when working with families managing T1D.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Self-Control , Adolescent , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Protective Factors
4.
Pediatr Diabetes ; 23(4): 433-438, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854139

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An increase in newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been posited during the COVID-19 pandemic, but data are conflicting. We aimed to determine trends in newly diagnosed T1D and severity of presentation at diagnosis for pediatric and adolescent patients during COVID-19 (2020) as compared to the previous year (2019) in a multi-center analysis across the United States. METHODS: This retrospective study from seven centers in the T1D Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative (T1DX-QI) included data on new onset T1D diagnosis and proportion in DKA at diagnosis from January 1 to December 31, 2020, compared to the prior year. Chi-square tests were used to compare differences in patient characteristics during the pandemic period compared to the prior year. RESULTS: Across seven sites, there were 1399 newly diagnosed T1D patients in 2020, compared to 1277 in 2019 (p = 0.007). A greater proportion of newly diagnosed patients presented in DKA in 2020 compared to 2019 (599/1399(42.8%) vs. 493/1277(38.6%), p = 0.02), with a higher proportion presenting with severe DKA (p = 0.01) as characterized by a pH <7.1 and/or bicarbonate of <5 mmol/L. Monthly data trends demonstrated a higher number of new T1D diagnoses over the spring and summer months (March to September) of 2020 compared to 2019 (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: We found an increase in newly diagnosed T1D and a greater proportion presenting in DKA at diagnosis during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the prior year. Future longitudinal studies are needed to confirm these findings with population level data and determine the long-term impact of COVID-19 on diabetes trends.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Diabetic Ketoacidosis , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/diagnosis , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
5.
Am J Epidemiol ; 191(7): 1153-1173, 2022 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740791

ABSTRACT

The Collaborative Cohort of Cohorts for COVID-19 Research (C4R) is a national prospective study of adults comprising 14 established US prospective cohort studies. Starting as early as 1971, investigators in the C4R cohort studies have collected data on clinical and subclinical diseases and their risk factors, including behavior, cognition, biomarkers, and social determinants of health. C4R links this pre-coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) phenotyping to information on severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and acute and postacute COVID-related illness. C4R is largely population-based, has an age range of 18-108 years, and reflects the racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic diversity of the United States. C4R ascertains SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 illness using standardized questionnaires, ascertainment of COVID-related hospitalizations and deaths, and a SARS-CoV-2 serosurvey conducted via dried blood spots. Master protocols leverage existing robust retention rates for telephone and in-person examinations and high-quality event surveillance. Extensive prepandemic data minimize referral, survival, and recall bias. Data are harmonized with research-quality phenotyping unmatched by clinical and survey-based studies; these data will be pooled and shared widely to expedite collaboration and scientific findings. This resource will allow evaluation of risk and resilience factors for COVID-19 severity and outcomes, including postacute sequelae, and assessment of the social and behavioral impact of the pandemic on long-term health trajectories.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315032

ABSTRACT

Background: On March 11, 2020, COVID-19 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. The social isolation and economic stress resulting from pandemic have the potential to exacerbate child abuse and neglect. Objective: This study examines the association of parents’ perceived social isolation and recent employment loss to risk for child maltreatment (neglect, verbal aggression, and physical punishment) in the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants and Setting: Participants (N = 283) were adults living in the U.S. who were parents of at least one child 0-12 years of age. Methods: Participants completed an online survey approximately 2 weeks after the World Health Organization declared that COVID-19 was a pandemic. The survey asked about recent changes (i.e., in the past 2 weeks) to employment status, parenting behaviors, use of discipline, use of spanking, and depressive symptoms. Results: Parents’ perceived social isolation and recent employment loss were associated with self-report of physical and emotional neglect and verbal aggression against the child, even after statistically controlling for parental depressive symptoms, income, and sociodemographic factors. Parents’ perceived social isolation was associated with parental report of changes in discipline, specifically, using discipline and spanking more often in the past 2 weeks. Associations were robust to analyses that included two variables that assessed days spent social distancing and days spent in “lockdown.” Conclusions: Study results point to the need for mental health supports to parents and children to ameliorate the strain created by COVID-19.

7.
J Gen Intern Med ; 37(5): 1218-1225, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1649390

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term prevalence and risk factors for post-acute COVID-19 sequelae (PASC) are not well described and may have important implications for unvaccinated populations and policy makers. OBJECTIVE: To assess health status, persistent symptoms, and effort tolerance approximately 1 year after COVID-19 infection DESIGN: Retrospective observational cohort study using surveys and clinical data PARTICIPANTS: Survey respondents who were survivors of acute COVID-19 infection requiring Emergency Department presentation or hospitalization between March 3 and May 15, 2020. MAIN MEASURE(S): Self-reported health status, persistent symptoms, and effort tolerance KEY RESULTS: The 530 respondents (median time between hospital presentation and survey 332 days [IQR 325-344]) had mean age 59.2±16.3 years, 44.5% were female and 70.8% were non-White. Of these, 41.5% reported worse health compared to a year prior, 44.2% reported persistent symptoms, 36.2% reported limitations in lifting/carrying groceries, 35.5% reported limitations climbing one flight of stairs, 38.1% reported limitations bending/kneeling/stooping, and 22.1% reported limitations walking one block. Even those without high-risk comorbid conditions and those seen only in the Emergency Department (but not hospitalized) experienced significant deterioration in health, persistent symptoms, and limitations in effort tolerance. Women (adjusted relative risk ratio [aRRR] 1.26, 95% CI 1.01-1.56), those requiring mechanical ventilation (aRRR 1.48, 1.02-2.14), and people with HIV (aRRR 1.75, 1.14-2.69) were significantly more likely to report persistent symptoms. Age and other risk factors for more severe COVID-19 illness were not associated with increased risk of PASC. CONCLUSIONS: PASC may be extraordinarily common 1 year after COVID-19, and these symptoms are sufficiently severe to impact the daily exercise tolerance of patients. PASC symptoms are broadly distributed, are not limited to one specific patient group, and appear to be unrelated to age. These data have implications for vaccine hesitant individuals, policy makers, and physicians managing the emerging longer-term yet unknown impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Status , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Diabetes Technol Ther ; 23(9): 642-651, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387686

ABSTRACT

Background: We describe the utilization of telemedicine visits (video or telephone) across the type 1 diabetes (T1D) Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative (T1DX-QI) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Metrics, site-level survey results, and examples of interventions conducted to support telemedicine in T1D are shown. Materials and Methods: Thirteen clinics (11 pediatric, 2 adult) provided monthly telemedicine metrics between December 2019 and August 2020 and 21 clinics completed a survey about their telemedicine practices. Results: The proportion of telemedicine visits in T1DX-QI before the pandemic was <1%, rising to an average of 95.2% in April 2020 (range 52.3%-99.5%). Three sites initially used mostly telephone visits before converting to video visits. By August 2020, the proportion of telemedicine visits decreased to an average of 45% across T1DX-QI (range 10%-86.6%). The majority of clinics (62%) performed both video and telephone visits; Zoom was the most popular video platform used. Over 95% of clinics reported using CareLink™, Clarity®, Glooko™, and/or t:connect® to view device data, with only one center reporting automated data upload into the electronic medical record. The majority of centers had multidisciplinary teams participating in the video visits. All sites reported reimbursement for video visits, and 95% of sites reported coverage for telephone visits early on in the pandemic. Conclusions: There was rapid adoption of telemedicine in T1DX-QI during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future insurance reimbursement for telemedicine visits and the ideal ratio of telemedicine to in-person visits in T1D care remain to be determined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Telemedicine , Adult , Child , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
10.
Child Abuse Negl ; 121: 105262, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347534

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is likely to have negatively impacted foster families but few data sources are available to confirm this. OBJECTIVE: The current study used Reddit social media data to examine how foster families are faring in the pandemic. Discussion topics were identified and examined for changes before and after COVID-19. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: Comments were collected from three Reddit online discussion boards dedicated to foster families (N = 11,830). METHODS: We used machine learning techniques, including Latent Dirichlet Allocation, for topic modeling and textual analysis for qualitative coding of the Reddit comments. RESULTS: Results showed that three main topics had both significant quantitative and meaningful qualitative changes before and after COVID-19. There were significant increases in conversation about becoming a foster parent (F = 5.75, p = 0.02) and activities for foster children (F = 10.61, p = 0.001), whereas there was a significant decrease in discussing permanency (F = 9.46, p = 0.003) before and after the onset of COVID-19. Qualitative coding showed that regarding the topic of becoming a parent, excitement over approval of foster care license before COVID-19 shifted to foster families' increased anxieties about delays in their licensing cases after COVID-19. For permanency, content changed from the best interest of the child and reunifications before COVID-19 to concerns over family separations and permanency challenges after COVID-19. Regarding activities for foster children, content related to everyday activities before COVID-19 changed to specific activities foster children and families could do during lockdowns. Results suggest areas child welfare workers may focus on to better support foster families during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Foster Home Care , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Fam Violence ; 37(5): 813-824, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1037309

ABSTRACT

On March 11, 2020, COVID-19 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization. The social isolation and economic stress resulting from pandemic have the potential to exacerbate child abuse and neglect. This study examines the association of parents' perceived social isolation and recent employment loss to risk for child maltreatment (neglect, verbal aggression, and physical punishment) in the early weeks of the pandemic. Participants (N = 283) were adults living in the U.S. who were parents of at least one child 0-12 years of age. Participants completed an online survey approximately 2 weeks after the World Health Organization declared that COVID-19 was a pandemic. The survey asked about recent changes (i.e., in the past 2 weeks) to employment status, parenting behaviors, use of discipline, use of spanking, and depressive symptoms. Nearly 20% of parents had hit or spanked their child in the past two weeks alone. Parents' perceived social isolation and recent employment loss were associated with self-report of physical and emotional neglect and verbal aggression against the child, even after controlling for parental depressive symptoms, income, and sociodemographic factors. Parents' perceived social isolation was associated with parental report of changes in discipline, specifically, using discipline and spanking more often in the past 2 weeks. Associations were robust to analyses that included two variables that assessed days spent social distancing and days spent in "lockdown." Study results point to the need for mental health supports to parents and children to ameliorate the strain created by COVID-19.

12.
HERD ; 14(2): 38-48, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975844

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES, PURPOSES, OR AIM: To identify design strategies utilized in airborne infection isolation and biocontainment patient rooms that improve infection control potential in an alternative care environment. BACKGROUND: As SARS-CoV-2 spreads and health care facilities near or exceed capacity, facilities may implement alternative care sites (ACSs). With COVID-19 surges predicted, developing additional capacity in alternative facilities, including hotels and convention centers, into patient care environments requires early careful consideration of the existing space constraints, infrastructure, and modifications needed for patient care and infection control. Design-based strategies utilizing engineering solutions have the greatest impact, followed by medical and operational strategies. METHODS: This article evaluates infection control and environmental strategies in inpatient units and proposes system modifications to ACS surge facilities to reduce infection risk and improve care environments. RESULTS: Although adequate for an acute infectious disease outbreak, existing capacity in U.S. biocontainment units and airborne infection isolation rooms is not sufficient for widespread infection control and isolation during a pandemic. To improve patients' outcomes and decrease infection transmission risk in the alternative care facility, hospital planners, administrators, and clinicians can take cues from evidence-based strategies implemented in biocontainment units and standard inpatient rooms. CONCLUSIONS: Innovative technologies, including optimized air-handling systems with ultraviolet and particle filters, can be an essential part of an infection control strategy. For flexible surge capacity in future ACS and hospital projects, interdisciplinary design and management teams should apply strategies optimizing the treatment of both infectious patients and minimizing the risk to health care workers.


Subject(s)
Built Environment/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/organization & administration , Patients' Rooms/organization & administration , Built Environment/standards , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics , Patient Isolation/standards , Patients' Rooms/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Ventilation/standards
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