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1.
Aust N Z J Public Health ; 2022 Mar 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1746000

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore injury deaths in international and domestic interstate travellers, together with those newly arrived to Australia. METHODS: A population-based cohort study of all injury-related deaths between 1January 2006 and 31 December 2017 registered with Births Death and Marriages in Australia was conducted using Australian Bureau of Statistics' (ABS) Cause of Death information. Population data on travellers were obtained from Tourism Research Australia. RESULTS: There were 4,503 injury-related traveller deaths (domestic interstate:3,055; international:934; new arrivals:514). The average annual age-standardised mortality rates in domestic interstate travellers was 0.75 per 100,000, compared with 2.22 per 100,000 in international travellers. Leading causes of injury-related death were land transport incidents (n=1495, 33.2%), self-harm (n=786, 17.5%) and falls (n=513, 11.4%), with differences in mechanism by state/territory, traveller type and age group. Intentional self-harm was common amongst all visitor types, however, it was the primary cause of death in new arrivals Conclusion: Age-standardised mortality rates were almost three-fold higher in international than domestic travellers. New arrivals, international and domestic travellers have different injury profiles, and each require specific prevention strategies. IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH: While COVID has restricted travel to and within Australia, this has provided an opportunity for exploration, reflection, and consideration of risk factors for travellers, and to develop targeted injury prevention strategies for visitor types, so travel experience can be optimised and the magnitude of harm can be reduced.

2.
J Travel Med ; 2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722539

ABSTRACT

This cross-sectional study evaluated the adaptations of current ISTM members in relation to the disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. It demonstrates that the majority of members remain engaged with travel medicine and ISTM educational activities, while adapting to COVID-related clinical demands.

3.
Trop Med Infect Dis ; 7(2)2022 Jan 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648874

ABSTRACT

This Special Issue focuses on recent global research on the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic [...].

4.
Integr Pharm Res Pract ; 11: 9-19, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1627643

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Pharmacists at airport pharmacies could offer essential health services for air travelers. Consequently, this study aimed to explore the type of professional services, the types of medicines at airport pharmacies and the pharmacists' experiences and views regarding their practices. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted with pharmacists practicing in airport pharmacies from June 2020 to December 2020. A validated Google form-based interview questionnaire was developed, and the electronic link was sent to the participants. Recruitment of participants was continued until data saturation was achieved. In total, 15 pharmacists working at different airport pharmacies in different countries were included. Thematic analysis was used in the data analysis. Results: The study identified six major themes including type of professional services and medicines at airport pharmacies, pharmacists' experiences, challenges at the airport pharmacy, suggestions to improve airport pharmacy services, pandemics and the role of pharmacists, and business aspect of the airport pharmacies. The study showed that several professional services provided at airport pharmacies, including the provision of medicines, health products, general health services, travel health services, and counseling. Moreover, 46.7% of the participants reported having a dedicated travel health service. In addition, most of the participants described their experience at airport pharmacies as good and exciting as they met different people from different countries. The most common challenges that pharmacists face at airport pharmacies include language barriers, requests for different medicine brands by travelers, and financial issues. The participants indicated that there is a need for promotion of pharmacists' role in providing health care services at airport pharmacies. Conclusion: The study showed that pharmacists could play vital roles in providing medicines and health care services for air travelers. However, there is still further scope for improvement in this sector of the pharmacy profession to ensure a more active role in travel medicine.

6.
Travel Med Infect Dis ; 40: 101973, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065626

ABSTRACT

Aircrew fitness-to-fly is among the elements that make aviation the safest form of long-distance transport. The health of cabin crew is a crucial determinant in carrying out safety-related duties. 'Fitness-to-fly' is associated with defined workplace conditions, for which airlines have a legal duty to ensure fitness for employment. We explored the literature on fitness-to-fly to obtain a pragmatic assessment of the challenges for aeromedical examinations. Regulations promulgated by aviation regulatory authorities and airline-internal policies have similar status and meaning, yet there is no harmonised approach internationally, and an inability to conform periodic medical assessments to actual operational fitness. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need to better understand fitness-to-fly criteria. Fitness-to-fly measures are mainly based on self-reported data and there is a need for a 'safety' factor for self-reports. Aeromedical evaluations should evolve from meeting medical standards to include pandemics as an element of the overall risk of aircraft operations. Re-evaluating criteria for fitness-to-fly assessment will further the goal of linking research to the actual needs of public health decisionmakers. If airlines are to resume operations at pre-pandemic levels, they must demonstrate to the public and public health agencies that fitness-to-fly assessment is appropriate and effective.


Subject(s)
Aircraft/standards , Aviation/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Workplace/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Workforce , Humans , Occupational Health/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Policy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Self Report
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