Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
Add filters

Language
Document Type
Year range
1.
Alzheimer's & Dementia ; 17(S10):e053028, 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1589248

ABSTRACT

Background Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) is a randomized trial that showed beneficial effect on cognition with a 2-year multidomain lifestyle intervention. During the post-intervention follow-up, COVID19 pandemic emerged resulting in lockdown and reduced services. Our aim is to investigate how lifestyle and behavior changes during the pandemic are related to lifestyle earlier in the study. Method The FINGER cohort included 1260 individuals aged 60-77 years at baseline and at risk of dementia, randomized into multidomain intervention or control groups. A postal survey was sent to all eligible participants from the FINGER study in June 2020 (end of the first wave of the pandemic in Finland), on average 10 year after the baseline. 859 (68%) were still alive and eligible for the survey. Result Total of 735 responders (85% of the eligible participants) were on average 78 years old. They were younger, had higher baseline cognition, and were more often from the former control group than non-responders (p<0.05 for all). The intervention allocation showed no association with self-reported lifestyle changes during the pandemic in diet, exercise, or cognitive activity. Among older participants (>78 y), the intervention group reported more increase in remote contact with friends and relatives (p=0.013) and health care (p=0.042) than the control, and also less pandemic-related reduction in overall contact with friends (p=0.045). Among all, reductions in physical exercise were reported among those who were less physically active earlier in the study. Both increase and decrease in contact with friends and family were reported by those more cognitively active earlier in the study. They also had more increase in remote contacts. Changes in diet were positive (increase in fruit and vegetable intake), but they were not related to earlier diet. Conclusion The FINGER participants reported only minor change in their lifestyle and behavior during the first wave of the COVID pandemic related lockdown. For physical activity, the pandemic appeared to have negative effect particularly among those with lower levels earlier, possibly adding inequalities. Intervention was related to more remote contacts, probably due to better computer literacy after the cognitive training.

2.
Alzheimer's & Dementia ; 17(S10):e055290, 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1589228

ABSTRACT

Background Restrictions enforced in many counties during the COVID-19 pandemic may have both short- and long-term effects on the risk factors relevant for cognitive impairment and dementia. The COVID-19 pandemic occurred during the post-intervention follow-up phase of the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) postponing the planned follow-up visits of the participants. We investigated how the first phase of the COVID-19 pandemic affected lifestyles and other risk factors among the FINGER participants using a postal survey. Method A survey was sent in June 2020 to 859 eligible FINGER participants. The survey was developed to assess the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and related infection-control measures on lifestyles, daily life, commitment to distancing measures, access to healthcare and social services, and changes in cognitive and social activities, as well as emotional health and wellbeing. Result A total of 735 participants responded to the survey (85% of the eligible participants). They were on average 78 years old at the time of the survey. Majority of the participants adopted some distancing practices during the first months of the pandemic. Older participants were more likely to practice total isolation than younger ones. Pandemic-related changes were reported in social engagement, including less contact with friends and family, and less frequent participation in cultural events or associations, but on the other hand the frequency of remote contacts with others was increased. About a third of the participants reported that their physical activity was reduced, and this was more common among those who had been less active earlier. Pandemic-related changes in lifestyle and activities were more evident among those living alone. Conclusion Finnish older persons were mainly reporting that they coped in the pandemic situation quite well. Older participants seemed to be more susceptible to negative changes. Also persons with less physical activity previously were likely to reduce their activities even more. This may have long-term consequences on the cognitive health of older adults, and it may also impact the longer-term effects of the FINGER intervention.

3.
Alzheimer's & Dementia ; 17(S10):e056732, 2021.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1589202

ABSTRACT

Background Older adults have higher risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, and they also represent the group most severely affected by the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic in terms of higher morbidity and mortality. The World-Wide FINGERS (WW-FINGERS) global network of multidomain trials for dementia risk reduction and prevention (Kivipelto et al., 2020) provides a unique framework to explore how the pandemic has affected factors related to mental and physical health of populations at increased risk of dementia, while accounting also for country-specific strategies to contain the spread of the infection. Methods The WW-FINGERS-SARS-CoV2 survey has been developed to explore direct and indirect effects of the pandemic in midlife and older age. The questions aim to measure changes in lifestyle factors (e.g., diet, physical activity), management of chronic noncommunicable diseases (e.g., diabetes, hypertension), as well as psychosocial factors - including depressive symptoms, sleep disorders, social isolation - that are relevant to cognition and are expected to be affected by the pandemic. The survey measures also established and possible epidemiologic risk factors for severe COVID-19. To facilitate distribution is different settings, both a pen-and-paper and a digital version of the survey have been developed in several languages. The digital version is supported through REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), a secure web-based software that is being also used for harmonized data collection. Results Over 25 countries are taking part in the survey. Local adaptations and piloting are being done to optimize implementation in both clinical-based and population-based settings. Participants are in the at-risk spectrum for dementia: from cognitively normal persons to individuals with pre-dementia cognitive symptoms. An updated report of the survey status will be presented. Conclusion the survey is a joint global action of the WW-FINGERS network which can inform better care of older adults in the context of a pandemic. The survey is also a valuable tool for pre-screening of participants for prevention trials, and results can inform adaptions to ensure successful recruitment and adherence in forthcoming multidomain trials for dementia prevention in older adults.

4.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 624125, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110353

ABSTRACT

Aims: This study aimed to describe how the first phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected older persons from the general Finnish population who are at risk of developing or have cognitive impairment, specifically, to describe whether participants experienced a change in risk factors that are relevant for the prevention of cognitive decline including diet, physical activity, access to medical care, socially and cognitively stimulating activities, and emotional health and well-being. Method: A postal survey was sent in June 2020 to 859 participants from the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), an ongoing longitudinal study. The survey was developed to assess the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic and related infection-control measures on daily life, specifically commitment to distancing measures, access to health care and social services, daily activities, and changes in cognitive and social activities. Results: By September 2020, 613 (71%) participants responded (mean age = 77.7 years, 32% lived alone, and 80% had at least one chronic condition). Three quarters adopted some distancing practices during the first months of the pandemic. Older participants were more likely to practice total isolation than younger ones (29 vs. 19%; p = 0.003). Non-acute health-care visits were canceled for 5% of the participants who needed appointments, but cancellations in dental health care (43%), home aid (30%), and rehabilitative services (53%) were more common. Pandemic-related changes were reported in social engagements, for example, less contact with friends (55%) and family (31%), or less frequent attendance in cultural events (38%) or associations (25%), although remote contact with others increased for 40%. Feelings of loneliness increased for 21%, particularly those who were older (p = 0.023) or living alone (p < 0.001). Physical activity reduced for 34%, but dietary habits remained stable or improved. Pandemic-related changes in lifestyle and activities were more evident among those living alone. Conclusions: Finnish older persons generally reported less negative changes in lifestyles and behaviors during the pandemic than expected. Older people and those living alone seemed more susceptible to negative changes. It is important to compare how coping strategies may compare with other European countries to identify factors that may help older individuals to maintain healthy lifestyles during future waves of COVID-19.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL