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1.
Ann Ig ; 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080847

ABSTRACT

Background: During 2020, COVID-19 had a diversified distribution in Italy, the first nation in Europe to experience the outbreak of the epidemic. This was linked to geographical differences in population density and distribution of healthcare facilities, including Emergency Departments (EDs). This study aims to assess the impact of the pandemic on ED utilization in 2020 across different subpopulations and geographical locations in Italy. Methods: We used anonymized data from a survey conducted by the Italian National Institute of Statistics on 25,000 families to analyze the yearly rate of people who used EDs from 2015 to 2020. The rate of persons who accessed ED services in 2020 per 1,000 population was compared with those of the previous non-pandemic years. Results: The number of people accessing EDs in 2020 was 32.3% lower, although this reduction was not uniform across the 21 regions / autonomous provinces. People aged 0-14 years experienced the highest reduction in ED visits. In 2020, low educational level people exhibited a steeper reduction in the use of EDs. Conclusions: This study shows a significant drop in EDs use especially by children; the population section mostly affected by the effects of the pandemic. This study also confirms that education and socio-economic status are important determinants of ED use. The heterogeneous reduction in ED use across the regions of Italy highlights the need to further investigate the impact of this pattern on the health of the population, as well as to define adequate preparedness strategies to face future emergencies.

2.
Diabetes research and clinical practice ; 186:109382-109382, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1877003
3.
Italian Journal of Gender-Specific Medicine ; 7(3):128-133, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1566583

ABSTRACT

Data from adult studies show that COVID-19 is more severe in men than women. However, no data are available for the pediatric population. For this reason, we performed this study aiming to understand if sex influenced disease severity and outcomes in a large cohort of Latin-American children with COVID-19 and multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). We found that a higher percentage of male children developed MIS-C (8.9% vs 5% in females) and died (1.2% and 0.4% in females), although on multivariate adjusted analyses the only statistically significant difference was found in need of hospitalization, with females less frequently admitted compared with boys (25.6% vs 35.4%). This data are preliminary and need further independent studies to better assess the role of sex. © 2021, Il Pensiero Scientifico Editore s.r.l.. All rights reserved.

4.
Medico e Bambino ; 40(5):315-320, 2021.
Article in Italian | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1257687

ABSTRACT

Background - The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic and subsequent containment measures are causing a worldwide increase in food insecurity (FI). Food insecurity has been related to a number of negative health implications, particularly for the most vulnerable population, including children and adolescents. Aim - To investigate the effects on FI during the lockdown in Italy and the changes in eating habits and body weight in the paediatric population 6 months after the beginning of the pandemic. Materials and Methods - An online anonymous cross-sectional survey was elaborated and proposed to the parents of children < 18 years old. Results - 8.3% reported that their families were at risk of FI before the outbreak of SARSCoV-2 pandemic. This percentage dramatically doubled after the pandemic began. Moreover, 27.3% of the parents reported that their children were eating more, with a concomitant increase in “junk food” consumption. About one third of respondents declared an increase in children’s weight, while weight loss were uncommon and prevailed among adolescents. It was observed that parents’ higher age, higher parents’ school grade and working parents were protective factors against FI. Conclusion - Since the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is requiring restrictions again, it is crucial that health care and social protection programmes take into account concepts of equity and sustainability to ensure adequate food and nutrition security for everyone.

5.
Public Health ; 194: 182-184, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157676

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study is to compare excess mortality (EM) patterns and spatial correlation between the first and second wave of the pandemic in Lombardy, the Italian region that paid an extremely high COVID-19-related mortality toll in March and April 2020. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a longitudinal study using municipality-level mortality data. METHODS: We investigated the patterns and spatial correlation of EM of men aged ≥75 years during the first two pandemic waves (March-April 2020 vs November 2020) of COVID-19, using the mortality data released by the Italian National Institute of Statistics. EM was estimated at the municipality level to accurately detect the critical areas within the region. RESULTS: The areas that were mostly hit during the first wave of COVID-19 were generally spared by the second wave: EM of men aged ≥75 years in the municipality of Bergamo plummeted from +472% in March and April to -13% in November, and in Cremona the variation was from +344% to -19%. Conversely, in November 2020 EM was higher in some areas that had been protected in the first wave of the pandemic. Spatial correlation widely corroborates these findings, as large sections of the hot spots of EM detected in the first wave of the pandemic changed into cold spots in the second wave, and vice versa. CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal the specular distribution of EM between the first and second wave of the pandemic, which may entail the consequences of social distancing measures and individual behaviors, local management strategies, 'harvesting' of the frailer population and, possibly, acquired immune protection. In conclusion, our findings support the need for continuous monitoring and analysis of mortality data using detailed spatial resolution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Pandemics , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cities/epidemiology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Mortality/trends , Small-Area Analysis , Spatial Analysis
6.
Public Health ; 187: 187-188, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695148
7.
Public Health ; 185: 39-41, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-526618
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