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1.
Curr Oncol ; 29(2): 989-1000, 2022 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686627

ABSTRACT

In the following report, we describe 11 patients with various diagnoses and different treatment statuses (newly diagnosed, receiving treatment, or follow-up) of oncological diseases (breast, lymphoma, melanoma, and head and neck cancers). The patients underwent PET-CT for disease staging or follow-up and it was noted that all patients had areas of hypermetabolic uptake in the axillary lymph-nodes of the ipsilateral upper extremity where the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine was administered. Following further investigations, including an ultrasound (US), biopsies and an examination of medical records, it was concluded that these findings were the result of the vaccination and not a progression of pre-existing disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Positron-Emission Tomography , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
J Pediatr Surg Case Rep ; 64: 101734, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023562

ABSTRACT

We describe 4 children (11-17 years in age) at our institution with acute appendicitis in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting a possible association. Providers should consider testing for this infection in patients with severe gastrointestinal symptoms, in order to take appropriate transmission based precautions, until more is understood.

4.
Cureus ; 12(8): e9943, 2020 Aug 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740575

ABSTRACT

Introduction The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been unprecedented in recent history. The rapid global spread has demonstrated how the emergence of a novel pathogen necessitates new information to advise both healthcare systems and policy-makers. The directives for the management of COVID-19 have been limited to infection control measures and treatment of patients, which has left physicians and researchers alone to navigate the massive amount of research being published while searching for evidence-based strategies to care for patients. To tackle this barrier, we launched CovidReview.ca, an open-access, continually updated, online platform that screens available COVID-19 research to determine higher quality publications. This paper uses data from this review process to explore the activity and trends of COVID-19 research worldwide over time, while specifically looking at the types of studies being published. Materials and Methods The literature search was conducted on PubMed. Search terms included "COVID-19", "severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2", "coronavirus 19", "SARS-COV-2", and "2019-nCoV". All articles captured by this strategy were reviewed by a minimum of two reviewers and categorized by type of research, relevant medical specialties, and type of publication. Criteria were developed to allow for inclusion or exclusion to the website. Due to the volume of research, only a level 1 (title and abstract) screen was performed. Results The time period for the analysis was January 17, 2020, to May 10, 2020. The total number of papers captured by the search criteria was 10,685, of which 2,742 were included on the website and 7,943 were excluded. The greatest increase in the types of studies over the 16 weeks was narrative review/expert opinion papers followed by case series/reports. Meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and randomized controlled trials remained the least published types of studies. Conclusions The surge of research that accompanied the COVID-19 pandemic is unparalleled in recent years. From our analysis, it is clear that case reports and narrative reviews were the most widely published, particularly in the earlier days of this pandemic. Continued research that falls higher on the evidence pyramid and is more applicable to clinical settings is warranted.

5.
MIT Sloan Management Review ; 61(4):13-15, 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-606999

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic has led to a surge in virtual work across companies, with many or even all employees working from home for an extended period of time. One of the key unintended consequences of this widespread switch to virtual work is the impact on the relationships and interpersonal networks within organizations. By better understanding how working remotely can damage connections, trust, and cooperation, managers can act to mitigate those effects. One of the biggest drivers of who interacts with whom in organizations is physical proximity - a phenomenon that's been observed from the US Senate to the Google campus. Amazingly, even a distance of a meter or two can make a big difference. When everyone goes virtual, though, employees can no longer casually run into someone in the hallway or one desk over. They do still keep in touch with the people they feel closest to and with coworkers they're required to work with on particular tasks, but with everyone else, the level of interaction is drastically reduced.

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