Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Eur J Rheumatol ; 2022 Feb 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687311

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The experiences of children with pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD) during the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic have not been well-documented. We sought to determine the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on protective behaviors, healthcare access, medication management, and education among an international cross-sectional parental survey of children with PRDs. METHODS: The COVID-19 Global Rheumatology Alliance Patient Experience Survey was distributed online, and parents of children with parental-reported PRD, with or without COVID-19 infection, were eligible to enroll. Respondents described their child's demographics, adoptions of protective behaviors, healthcare access, changes to immunosuppression, and disruptions in schooling. RESULTS: A total of 427 children were included in the analyses. The most common rheumatic disease was juvenile idiopathic arthritis (40.7%), and most children were taking conventional synthetic diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) (54.6%) and/or biologic DMARDs (51.8%). A diagnosis of COVID-19 was reported in five children (1.2%), none of whom required hospitalization. Seventeen children (4.0%) had stopped or delayed their drugs due to concern for immunosuppression, most commonly glucocorticoids. Almost all families adopted behaviors to protect their children from COVID-19, including quarantining, reported by 96.0% of participants. In addition, 98.3% of full-time students experienced disruptions in their education, including cancelations of classes and transitions to virtual classrooms. CONCLUSION: Despite the low numbers of children with PRDs who developed COVID-19 in this cohort, most experienced significant disruptions in their daily lives, including quarantining and interruptions in their education. The drastic changes to these children's environments on their future mental and physical health and development remain unknown.

3.
Lancet Rheumatol ; 3(10): e707-e714, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact and consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with rheumatic disease are unclear. We developed the COVID-19 Global Rheumatology Alliance Patient Experience Survey to assess the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on people with rheumatic disease worldwide. METHODS: Survey questions were developed by key stakeholder groups and disseminated worldwide through social media, websites, and patient support organisations. Questions included demographics, rheumatic disease diagnosis, COVID-19 diagnosis, adoption of protective behaviours to mitigate COVID-19 exposure, medication access and changes, health-care access and communication with rheumatologists, and changes in employment or schooling. Adults age 18 years and older with inflammatory or autoimmune rheumatic diseases were eligible for inclusion. We included participants with and without a COVID-19 diagnosis. We excluded participants reporting only non-inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as fibromyalgia or osteoarthritis. FINDINGS: 12 117 responses to the survey were received between April 3 and May 8, 2020, and of these, 10 407 respondents had included appropriate age data. We included complete responses from 9300 adults with rheumatic disease (mean age 46·1 years; 8375 [90·1%] women, 893 [9·6%] men, and 32 [0·3%] participants who identified as non-binary). 6273 (67·5%) of respondents identified as White, 1565 (16·8%) as Latin American, 198 (2·1%) as Black, 190 (2·0%) as Asian, and 42 (0·5%) as Native American or Aboriginal or First Nation. The most common rheumatic disease diagnoses included rheumatoid arthritis (3636 [39·1%] of 9300), systemic lupus erythematosus (2882 [31·0%]), and Sjögren's syndrome (1290 [13·9%]). Most respondents (6921 [82·0%] of 8441) continued their antirheumatic medications as prescribed. Almost all (9266 [99·7%] of 9297) respondents adopted protective behaviours to limit SARS-CoV-2 exposure. A change in employment status occurred in 2524 (27·1%) of 9300) of respondents, with a 13·6% decrease in the number in full-time employment (from 4066 to 3514). INTERPRETATION: People with rheumatic disease maintained therapy and followed public health advice to mitigate the risks of COVID-19. Substantial employment status changes occurred, with potential implications for health-care access, medication affordability, mental health, and rheumatic disease activity. FUNDING: American College of Rheumatology.

4.
RMD Open ; 7(3)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398725

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We describe the early experiences of adults with systemic rheumatic disease who received the COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: From 2 April to 30 April 2021, we conducted an online, international survey of adults with systemic rheumatic disease who received COVID-19 vaccination. We collected patient-reported data on clinician communication, beliefs and intent about discontinuing disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) around the time of vaccination, and patient-reported adverse events after vaccination. RESULTS: We analysed 2860 adults with systemic rheumatic diseases who received COVID-19 vaccination (mean age 55.3 years, 86.7% female, 86.3% white). Types of COVID-19 vaccines were Pfizer-BioNTech (53.2%), Oxford/AstraZeneca (22.6%), Moderna (21.3%), Janssen/Johnson & Johnson (1.7%) and others (1.2%). The most common rheumatic disease was rheumatoid arthritis (42.3%), and 81.2% of respondents were on a DMARD. The majority (81.9%) reported communicating with clinicians about vaccination. Most (66.9%) were willing to temporarily discontinue DMARDs to improve vaccine efficacy, although many (44.3%) were concerned about rheumatic disease flares. After vaccination, the most reported patient-reported adverse events were fatigue/somnolence (33.4%), headache (27.7%), muscle/joint pains (22.8%) and fever/chills (19.9%). Rheumatic disease flares that required medication changes occurred in 4.6%. CONCLUSION: Among adults with systemic rheumatic disease who received COVID-19 vaccination, patient-reported adverse events were typical of those reported in the general population. Most patients were willing to temporarily discontinue DMARDs to improve vaccine efficacy. The relatively low frequency of rheumatic disease flare requiring medications was reassuring.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatic Diseases , Rheumatology , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Rheumatic Diseases/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
5.
World Neurosurg ; 150: e445-e465, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135597

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To replace educational opportunities lost during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Department of Neurosurgery at Lenox Hill Hospital produced an open-access webinar series ("BRAINterns") that covered a broad range of health care topics with a focus on neurosurgery. METHODS: This 8-week webinar series ran from July 1 to August 28, 2020. An optional exit survey was distributed to participants. Data were analyzed to characterize and better understand trends among a global cohort of participants. RESULTS: A total of 16,484 people registered for BRAINterns, and 6675 took the survey (40.5% response rate). Responders represented 87 countries, of which the majority were from the United States and Canada (90.48%, n = 6039). Responders were primarily female (82.9%, n = 5521). Racial and ethnic representation was majority Asian (42%, n = 2798), followed by White (22.7%, n = 1514), Hispanic/Latino (16.2%, n = 1080), and Black and African American (7.7%, n = 516). Participants reported hearing about BRAINterns through various social media platforms (72.18%, n = 4818)-the most popular was TikTok (33.4%, n = 2232). Overall, 93.4% of participants reported that the course was a good use of their time during the pandemic, and 86.7% reported that the course helped replace lost opportunities. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that webinar-based education is an effective method of expanding access to careers in medicine and in particular, neurosurgery, to traditionally underrepresented populations. Social media can be a powerful tool to combat barriers to early exposure and vastly improve diversity within the field.


Subject(s)
Internship and Residency/trends , Neurosurgery/education , Social Media , Videoconferencing/trends , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Career Choice , Child , Cultural Diversity , Curriculum , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
6.
World Neurosurg ; 142: 314-317, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has infected more than 13 million people on a global scale and claimed more than half million deaths across 213 countries and territories. While the focus is currently on recovery from the pandemic, the disease has significantly changed the way we practice medicine and neurosurgery in New York City and the United States. Apart from the emergency cases, several health systems across the country have similarly started to perform elective surgeries. Although COVID-19 screening and testing guidelines have been proposed and adopted by many hospitals, these may not adequately protect the operating room personnel who are in proximity to the patient for prolonged periods. There are concerning reports of especially high transmission rates of COVID-19 in transmucosal head and neck procedures conducted by otolaryngologists and neurosurgeons, despite attempts at wearing what constitutes appropriate personal protective equipment. METHODS: Here, we describe a simple technique of additional draping that can be used for all cranial, endonasal, spinal, and neurointerventional cases to limit the transmission of coronavirus. RESULTS: The proposed technique offers a simple, commonly available, cost-effective alternative that avoids the use of additional retractor systems. Moreover, this technique can be used in all neurosurgical procedures. CONCLUSIONS: With the rising concerns regarding airborne spread of the virus, we expect that these precautions will prove highly useful as we enter the recovery phase of this pandemic and hospitals attempt to prevent a return to widespread infection. In addition, its availability and cost effectiveness make this technique especially attractive to practical use in centers with limited resources.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Neurosurgical Procedures/instrumentation , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Surgical Drapes , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Nasal Cavity , Natural Orifice Endoscopic Surgery , Neuroendoscopy/instrumentation , Neuroendoscopy/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
7.
World Neurosurg ; 139: 289-293, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-232517

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak has left a lasting mark on medicine globally. METHODS: Here we outline the steps that the Lenox Hill Hospital/Northwell Health Neurosurgery Department-located within the epicenter of the pandemic in New York City-is currently taking to recover our neurosurgical efforts in the age of COVID-19. RESULTS: We outline measurable milestones to identify the transition to the recovery period and hope these recommendations may serve as a framework for an effective path forward. CONCLUSIONS: We believe that recovery following the COVID-19 pandemic offers unique opportunities to disrupt and rebuild the historical patient and office experience as we evolve with modern medicine in a post-COVID-19 world.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, Urban/standards , Neurosurgery/standards , Neurosurgical Procedures/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/surgery , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Neurosurgery/methods , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/surgery , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL