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1.
Frontiers in medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1610581

ABSTRACT

This paper reports a complete case of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), who presented with rapid deterioration of oxygenation during hospitalization despite escalating high-flow nasal cannulation to invasive mechanical ventilation. After inefficacy with lung-protective ventilation, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration, prone position, we administered extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a salvage respiratory support with ultra-protective ventilation for 47 days and finally discharged the patient home with a good quality of life with a Barthel Index Score of 100 after 76 days of hospitalization. The purpose of this paper is to provide a clinical reference for the management of ECMO and respiratory strategy of critical patients with COVID-19-related ARDS.

2.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; : 1-7, 2022 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585387

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Achieving high vaccination rates is key to containing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study evaluated the factors associated with uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: Six hundred and seventy-six respondents were surveyed online between May and June 2021. Data on demographics, perception of the COVID-19 pandemic, and vaccine willingness and hesitancy factors were collected. RESULTS: Approximately 54.6% of the respondents had received the COVID-19 vaccination. Age (p = 0.001), males (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.6, p = 0.026), ethnicity (p = 0.004), occupation (p = 0.003)), working in healthcare (OR 6.1, 95% CI 2.8-13.2, p < 0.001), smoking (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.3-8.8, p = 0.014), seeing vaccination as a social responsibility (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-12.0, p = 0.022) and believing the vaccine is important to end the COVID-19 pandemic (OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.1, p = 0.020) were associated with greater vaccination uptake. CONCLUSION: Social responsibility and well-being of collective society are important values associated with vaccine uptake in an Asian society. Understanding factors behind vaccine uptake can help advise public health measures and strategies to achieve high levels of vaccination.

3.
Australas J Ageing ; 2021 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570312

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impacted nursing home care and activities in profound ways. We sought to understand whether the COVID-19 pandemic had any impact on hospital admissions of nursing home residents. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of hospital admissions of nursing home residents to a tertiary general hospital in Singapore during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 was conducted and compared to admissions in the preceding year. Patients' demographics, length of stay, primary diagnosis on admission, death and causes of death were recorded. RESULTS: Our study found reduced number of hospital admissions of nursing home residents to a tertiary hospital in Singapore. There was a significant decrease in pneumonia (p < 0.001) and fall (p = 0.001) as a primary diagnosis on admission and a decrease in pneumonia as the cause of death (p < 0.001) for nursing home residents admitted to hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This suggests that measures implemented during the pandemic may have impacted outcomes of nursing home residents. Further study is warranted to lead to practise changing outcomes for nursing home settings.

4.
J Virol ; : JVI0160021, 2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559101

ABSTRACT

A comprehensive study of the B cell response against SARS-CoV-2 could be significant for understanding the immune response and developing therapeutical antibodies and vaccines. To define the dynamics and characteristics of the antibody repertoire following SARS-CoV-2 infection, we analyzed the mRNA transcripts of immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) repertoires of 24 peripheral blood samples collected between 3 and 111 days after symptom onset from 10 COVID-19 patients. Massive clonal expansion of naïve B cells with limited somatic hypermutation (SHM) was observed in the second week after symptom onset. The proportion of low-SHM IgG clones strongly correlated with spike-specific IgG antibody titers, highlighting the significant activation of naïve B cells in response to a novel virus infection. The antibody isotype switching landscape showed a transient IgA surge in the first week after symptom onset, followed by a sustained IgG elevation that lasted for at least 3 months. SARS-CoV-2 infection elicited poly-germline reactive antibody responses. Interestingly, 17 different IGHV germline genes recombined with IGHJ6 showed significant clonal expansion. By comparing the IgH repertoires that we sequenced with the 774 reported SARS-CoV-2-reactive monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), 13 shared spike-specific IgH clusters were found. These shared spike-specific IgH clusters are derived from the same lineage of several recently published neutralizing mAbs, including CC12.1, CC12.3, C102, REGN10977, and 4A8. Furthermore, identical spike-specific IgH sequences were found in different COVID-19 patients, suggesting a highly convergent antibody response to SARS-CoV-2. Our analysis based on sequencing antibody repertoires from different individuals revealed key signatures of the systemic B cell response induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection. IMPORTANCE Although the canonical delineation of serum antibody responses following SARS-CoV-2 infection has been well established, the dynamics of antibody repertoire at the mRNA transcriptional level has not been well understood, especially the correlation between serum antibody titers and the antibody mRNA transcripts. In this study, we analyzed the IgH transcripts and characterized the B cell clonal expansion and differentiation, isotype switching, and somatic hypermutation in COVID-19 patients. This study provided insights at the repertoire level for the B cell response after SARS-CoV-2 infection.

5.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296121

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused extensive public health concerns, posing significant challenges to healthcare services. One particular area of concern is the mental health of psychiatric patients, who are often a neglected group. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of, and associated factors for symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among psychiatric patients in China during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: : Self-reported questionnaires were distributed to patients in four psychiatric hospitals in Beijing, China, between April 28 th and May 30 th , 2020. Information regarding sociodemographic characteristics, COVID-19 related factors, support, psychosomatic factors, and PTSD symptoms was collected data using a series of scales, such as the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale, and so on. Multivariate regression was used to identify factors related to PTSD symptoms. Results: : A total of 1,055 psychiatric patients were included in the final sample. The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 41.3%. Hierarchical linear regression demonstrated that fear of the pandemic and anxiety were shared associated factors for both symptoms of PTSD and its subscales. Additionally, age was an associated factor for the total PTSD ( β = 0.12, p < 0.01), intrusion ( β = 0.18, p < 0.001), and avoidance ( β = 0.1, p < 0.05) symptoms;depression was an associated factor for the total PTSD s ( β = 0.13, p < 0.001), intrusion ( β = 0.11, p < 0.01), and hyperarousal ( β = 0.19, p < 0.001) symptoms. Conclusions: : The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was high among psychiatric patients during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. This study found that age, fear of the pandemic, anxiety and depression are significant associated factors of PTSD symptoms in psychiatric patients during the pandemic. We call for higher awareness and introduction of PTSD interventions to relieve the psychological stress in these patients.

6.
Sustainability ; 13(22):12540, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1538487

ABSTRACT

Subway station emergencies are gradually increasing in China. The aim of this research is to study the effects of “Dist”, “Pedestrian flow” and “Crowd density” on the heterogeneity of passengers’ decision-making preference and explore the relationship between heterogeneity and personality. Firstly, a questionnaire of 20 emergency evacuation scenarios, that includes the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, is designed. Secondly, the heterogeneity of passengers’ decision preference is quantified by the random parameter logit model. Finally, personality traits and influencing factors are used as abscissa and ordinate respectively, to study the relationship between personality traits and preference heterogeneity. The results show that the coefficients of “Dist”, “Pedestrian flow” and “Crowd density” are −0.101, 0.236 and −0.442 respectively, which are statistically significant. The proportion of extroverted passengers of the exit is 9% higher than that of introverted passengers when “Pedestrian flow” of the exit is greater than the average value, while the proportion of introverted passengers is 7% higher than that of extroverted passengers when “Crowd density” is smaller than the average value. The conclusion is that the three influence factors are random variables, and “Dist” shows the lowest level of heterogeneity. Extroverted passengers are more likely to follow a large crowd for evacuation, but introverted passengers are more likely to avoid crowded exits.

8.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-292030

ABSTRACT

Background: Many repurposed drugs have progressed rapidly to Phase 2 and 3 trials in COVID19 without characterisation of Pharmacokinetics /Pharmacodynamics including safety data. One such drug is Nafamostat Mesylate. Methods: We present the findings of a phase Ib/II open label, platform randomised controlled trial of intravenous Nafamostat in hospitalised patients with confirmed COVID-19 pneumonitis. Patients were assigned randomly to standard of care (SoC), Nafamostat or an alternative therapy. Nafamostat was administered as an intravenous infusion at a dose of 0.2mg/kg/hour for a maximum of seven days. The analysis population included those who received any dose of the trial drug and all patients randomised to SoC. Results: Data is reported from 42 patients, 21 of which were randomly assigned to receive intravenous Nafamostat. 78% of Nafamostat-treated patients experienced at least one AE compared to 57% of the SoC group. The Nafamostat group developed significantly higher plasma creatinine levels and had a lower number of oxygen free days (posterior mean difference 10.57 micromol/L, 95% HPD interval 2.43 - 18.92, rate ratio 0.55- 95% HPD interval 0.31- 0.99 respectively). There were no other statistically significant differences in endpoints between Nafamostat and SoC. PK data demonstrated that intravenous Nafamostat was rapidly broken down to inactive metabolites. We observed no significant anticoagulant effects in thromboelastometry. Participants in the Nafamostat group had higher D-Dimers. Interpretation: In hospitalised patients with COVID-19, we did not observe evidence of anti-inflammatory, anticoagulant or antiviral activity with intravenous Nafamostat. Further evaluation of Nafamostat delivered via a different route may be warranted. Clinical Trial Registration Details: This trial has been registered on ISRCTN (https://www.isrctn.com/) ISRCTN14212905, and Clinicaltrials.gov (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/) NCT04473053. Funding Information: DEFINE was funded by LifeArc (an independent medical research charity under the STOPCOVID award to the University of Edinburgh. We also thank the Oxford University COVID-19 Research Response Fund (BRD00230). Declaration of Interests: The authors report no conflict of interests. Ethics Approval Statement: The DEFINE trial has received full ethical approval from Scotland A REC (20/SS/0066), the MHRA (EudraCT 2020-002230-32) and NHS Lothian. Written informed consent was taken by trial clinicians prior to any trial procedures being performed. If a patient lacked capacity, consent could be provided by their next of kin.

9.
Mil Med Res ; 8(1): 57, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496239

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mitochondria have been shown to play vital roles during severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) development. Currently, it is unclear whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants, which define mtDNA haplogroups and determine oxidative phosphorylation performance and reactive oxygen species production, are associated with COVID-19 risk. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted to compare the distribution of mtDNA variations defining mtDNA haplogroups between healthy controls (n = 615) and COVID-19 patients (n = 536). COVID-19 patients were diagnosed based on molecular diagnostics of the viral genome by qPCR and chest X-ray or computed tomography scanning. The exclusion criteria for the healthy controls were any history of disease in the month preceding the study assessment. MtDNA variants defining mtDNA haplogroups were identified by PCR-RFLPs and HVS-I sequencing and determined based on mtDNA phylogenetic analysis using Mitomap Phylogeny. Student's t-test was used for continuous variables, and Pearson's chi-squared test or Fisher's exact test was used for categorical variables. To assess the independent effect of each mtDNA variant defining mtDNA haplogroups, multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with adjustments for possible confounding factors of age, sex, smoking and diseases (including cardiopulmonary diseases, diabetes, obesity and hypertension) as determined through clinical and radiographic examinations. RESULTS: Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that the most common investigated mtDNA variations (> 10% in the control population) at C5178a (in NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 gene, ND2) and A249d (in the displacement loop region, D-loop)/T6392C (in cytochrome c oxidase I gene, CO1)/G10310A (in ND3) were associated with a reduced risk of severe COVID-19 (OR = 0.590, 95% CI 0.428-0.814, P = 0.001; and OR = 0.654, 95% CI 0.457-0.936, P = 0.020, respectively), while A4833G (ND2), A4715G (ND2), T3394C (ND1) and G5417A (ND2)/C16257a (D-loop)/C16261T (D-loop) were related to an increased risk of severe COVID-19 (OR = 2.336, 95% CI 1.179-4.608, P = 0.015; OR = 2.033, 95% CI 1.242-3.322, P = 0.005; OR = 3.040, 95% CI 1.522-6.061, P = 0.002; and OR = 2.890, 95% CI 1.199-6.993, P = 0.018, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to explore the association of mtDNA variants with individual's risk of developing severe COVID-19. Based on the case-control study, we concluded that the common mtDNA variants at C5178a and A249d/T6392C/G10310A might contribute to an individual's resistance to developing severe COVID-19, whereas A4833G, A4715G, T3394C and G5417A/C16257a/C16261T might increase an individual's risk of developing severe COVID-19.

10.
The American Journal of Gastroenterology ; 116, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1478526
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(30): e26641, 2021 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475904

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This review aims to evaluate the supportive effects of frequently used traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for the treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Five databases were searched through July 7, 2020. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of TCM for use in the treatment of COVID-19 were included. Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) and modified Jadad score were used for the evaluation of the methodological quality of the included studies. Weighted mean difference, odds ratio (OR), and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated for pooling out results. Data were extracted for conducting a meta-analysis using STATA version 12.0. RESULTS: Eight studies with a total of 750 patients were included in this meta-analysis. All included trial groups involved treatment with TCM and Western medicine, while the control groups were treated only with Western medicine. The intervention therapy significantly improved the overall effective rate (n = 346, OR = 2.5, 95% CIs = 1.46-4.29), fever symptom disappearance rate (n = 436; OR = 3.6; 95% CIs = 2.13-6.08), fatigue symptom disappearance rate (n = 436; OR = 3.04; 95% CIs = 1.76-5.26), cough symptom disappearance rate (n = 436; OR = 2.91; 95% CIs = 1.36-6.19), and sputum production reduction (n = 436; OR = 5.51; 95% CIs = 1.94-15.64). Based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale assessment, 6 studies received a score of 4, and 1 study achieved a score of 5. One study was assessed using the modified Jadad score, achieving a score of 6. CONCLUSIONS: The integration of TCM with Western medicine has significantly improved the treatment for COVID-19 patients compared to Western medicine treatment alone. Combined therapy using TCM and Western medicine revealed the potential adjunctive role of TCM in treating COVID-19. However, high-quality clinical studies are still required to further evaluate the efficacy and safety of TCM in the treatment of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Medicine, Chinese Traditional , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Humans , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Treatment Outcome
13.
Ther Adv Respir Dis ; 15: 17534666211049739, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463196

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive role of lymphocyte subsets and other laboratory measurements in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Electronic medical records of adult patients with confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 from the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center were reviewed retrospectively to obtain relevant data. RESULTS: The mean age of patients was 40.98 ± 15.95 years, with 58% of the patients being males. The cutoff values at the intensive care unit (ICU) admission, mechanical ventilation, and mortality were CD4+ cells (267, 198, and 405), CD8+ cells (263, 203, and 182), and CD4+ /CD8+ cells (1.4, 1.8, and 1.4). The cutoffs below these values indicate the higher chances of disease progression. Higher CD4+ cell count led to lesser chances for ICU admission [odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.994 (0.991, 0.997); p = 0.0002] and mortality [OR (95% CI): 0.988 (0.979, 0.99); p = 0.001], higher CD8+ count was an independent risk factor for ICU admission. T-cell count positively correlated with total lymphocyte count and platelets, while negatively correlated with D-dimer and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Among patients with non-severe COVID-19, median CD8+ T cell, CD4+ T cell, total lymphocyte count, and platelets were 570, 362, 1.45, and 211, respectively, while median values decreased to 149, 106, 0.64, and 172, respectively, in patients with severe COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Lower T lymphocyte subsets were significantly associated with higher admission to ICU, mechanical ventilation, and mortality among patients with COVID-19. A cutoff value of ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and mortality below CD4+ cells (267, 198, and 405), CD8+ cells (263, 203, 182), and CD4+/CD8+ cells (1.4, 1.8, 1.4) may help identify patients at high risk of disease progression. The continuous evaluation of laboratory indices may help with dismal prognosis and prompt intervention to improve outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Lymphocyte Subsets/cytology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/cytology , Adult , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , China , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Anat Rec (Hoboken) ; 304(11): 2566-2578, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1460147

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 (coronavirus) has spread all over the world with a high infection rate. Currently, there are no targeted therapeutic drugs for COVID-19 as well as for stress induced by COVID-19. The unpredictable events of COVID-19 can trigger feelings of fear, worry, or unease in people, leading to stress-related disorders such as depression and anxiety. It has been reported that individuals, including COVID-19 patients, medical staff, and ordinary people, are under both physical and psychological pressure, and many of them have developed depression or anxiety during this pandemic. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been widely used in treating depression with relatively better safety and efficacy and may have an important role in treating stress-related disorders induced by COVID-19. In this review, we collected the common TCM treatment methods including Qigong, Acupuncture, Five Elements Musical Therapy, Five Elements Emotional Therapy, and Chinese herbal medicine from the databases of PubMed and the China National Knowledge Internet to illustrate the effect of TCM on depression. The better knowledge of TCM and implementation of TCM in COVID-19 clinics may help to effectively improve depression induced by COVID-19, may assist people to maintain a healthy physical and mental quality, and may alleviate the current shortage of medical resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/therapy , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Humans , Qigong/methods , Treatment Outcome
15.
Chem Soc Rev ; 50(21): 11844-11869, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454829

ABSTRACT

Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems have revolutionized biological and biomedical sciences in many ways. The last few years have also seen tremendous interest in deploying the CRISPR-Cas toolbox for analytical and diagnostic assay development because CRISPR-Cas is one of the most powerful classes of molecular machineries for the recognition and manipulation of nucleic acids. In the short period of development, many CRISPR-enabled assays have already established critical roles in clinical diagnostics, biosensing, and bioimaging. We describe in this review the recent advances and design principles of CRISPR mediated analytical tools with an emphasis on the functional roles of CRISPR-Cas machineries as highly efficient binders and molecular scissors. We highlight the diverse engineering approaches for molecularly modifying CRISPR-Cas machineries and for devising better readout platforms. We discuss the potential roles of these new approaches and platforms in enhancing assay sensitivity, specificity, multiplexity, and clinical outcomes. By illustrating the biochemical and analytical processes, we hope this review will help guide the best use of the CRISPR-Cas toolbox in detecting, quantifying and imaging biologically and clinically important molecules and inspire new ideas, technological advances and engineering strategies for addressing real-world challenges such as the on-going COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nucleic Acids , CRISPR-Cas Systems/genetics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 22(12): 2515-2516, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1446790
17.
Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi ; 46(18): 4865-4874, 2021 Sep.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441419

ABSTRACT

In ancient times, the original plants of Citri Exocarpium Rubrum and Citri Grandis Exocarpium had experienced succession and change, including tangerine(Citrus reticulata), pomelo(C. grandis), and Huazhou pomelo(C. grandis 'Tomentosa'), a specific cultivar of C. grandis produced in Huazhou, Guangdong. Before the Qing Dynasty, tangerine was the main original plant, while Huazhou pomelo came to the fore in the Qing Dynasty. In the 1950 s and 1960 s, the producing area of Huazhou pomelo was destroyed, and thus it had to be supplemented with pomelo. From then on, C. grandis 'Tomentosa' and C. grandis were both listed as the original plants of Citri Grandis Exocarpium in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. This paper reviewed the historical evolution of the collection, processing, and efficacy of Citri Exocarpium Rubrum and Citri Grandis Exocarpium. The research showed that:(1)The harvest time of the original plants of Citri Grandis Exocarpium and Citri Grandis Exocarpium had changed from maturity to immaturity. The collection and processing of Citri Exocarpium Rubrum was first recorded in the Illustrated Classics of Materia Medica in the Song Dynasty. During the Ming and Qing Dynasties, the mesocarp of Citri Exocarpium Rubrum needed to be removed completely, and Citri Grandis Exocarpium from C. grandis 'Tomentosa' was processed into different specifications such as seven-piece, five-piece, and single piece. Furthermore, processed young fruits of Huazhou pomelo appeared.(2)Citri Exocarpium Rubrum and Citri Grandis Exocarpium were processed with carp skin for the first time in the Master Lei's Discourse on Medicinal Processing. It was suggested that carp skin might be helpful for eliminating bones stuck in throat. During the Song, Jin, and Yuan Dynasties, some other processing methods such as ba-king, stir-frying, and salt-processing appeared. Honey, soil, ginger juice, and alum were firstly used as adjuvants for the processing in the Ming and Qing Dynasties. Citri Exocarpium Rubrum was mainly prepared with salt in order to improve the effect of lowering Qi, while it was unnecessary for Citri Grandis Exocarpium from C. grandis 'Tomentosa' because of its obvious effect of lowering Qi and eliminating phlegm. The stir-frying and honey-frying methods helped reduce the strong effect of Citri Grandis Exocarpium from C. grandis 'Tomentosa'.(3)According to the application of Citri Exocarpium Rubrum and Citri Grandis Exocarpium in history, their medicinal use began in Han and Tang Dynasties, developed in Song, Jin, and Yuan Dynasties, and matured in Ming and Qing Dynasties. Citri Grandis Exocarpium from C. grandis 'Tomentosa' was originally applied in Ming and Qing Dynasties, and it still plays an important in role treating COVID-19 nowadays. Moreover, Citri Grandis Exocarpium from C. grandis had cold medicinal property, while Citri Grandis Exocarpium from C. grandis 'Tomentosa' had warm medicinal property, and thus they should not be treated the same. At present, Huazhou pomelo has a certain production scale. Therefore, it is recommended that in the next edition of Chinese Pharmacopoeia, only C. grandis 'Tomentosa' should be included as the original plant of Citri Grandis Exocarpium, and C. grandis should be deleted. The results are conducive to the further development and utilization of Citri Exocarpium Rubrum and Citri Grandis Exocarpium, and support the rational use of Citri Grandis Exocarpium and its processed products.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Citrus , Drugs, Chinese Herbal , Materia Medica , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
19.
EClinicalMedicine ; 40: 101129, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401440

ABSTRACT

Background: A novel variant of SARS-CoV-2, the Delta variant of concern (VOC, also known as lineage B.1.617.2), is fast becoming the dominant strain globally. We reported the epidemiological, viral, and clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients infected with the Delta VOC during the local outbreak in Guangzhou, China. Methods: We extracted the epidemiological and clinical information pertaining to the 159 cases infected with the Delta VOC across seven transmission generations between May 21 and June 18, 2021. The whole chain of the Delta VOC transmission was described. Kinetics of viral load and clinical characteristics were compared with a cohort of wild-type infection in 2020 admitted to the Guangzhou Eighth People's Hospital. Findings: There were four transmission generations within the first ten days. The Delta VOC yielded a significantly shorter incubation period (4.0 vs. 6.0 days), higher viral load (20.6 vs. 34.0, cycle threshold of the ORF1a/b gene), and a longer duration of viral shedding in pharyngeal swab samples (14.0 vs. 8.0 days) compared with the wild-type strain. In cases with critical illness, the proportion of patients over the age of 60 was higher in the Delta VOC group than in the wild-type strain (100.0% vs. 69.2%, p = 0.03). The Delta VOC had a higher risk than wild-type infection in deterioration to critical status (hazards ratio 2.98 [95%CI 1.29-6.86]; p = 0.01). Interpretation: Infection with the Delta VOC is characterized by markedly increased transmissibility, viral loads and risk of disease progression compared with the wild-type strain, calling for more intensive prevention and control measures to contain future outbreaks. Funding: National Grand Program, National Natural Science Foundation of China, Guangdong Provincial Department of Science and Technology, Guangzhou Laboratory.

20.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(36)2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1370748

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has killed more than 4 million humans globally, but there is no bona fide Food and Drug Administration-approved drug-like molecule to impede the COVID-19 pandemic. The sluggish pace of traditional therapeutic discovery is poorly suited to producing targeted treatments against rapidly evolving viruses. Here, we used an affinity-based screen of 4 billion DNA-encoded molecules en masse to identify a potent class of virus-specific inhibitors of the SARS-CoV-2 main protease (Mpro) without extensive and time-consuming medicinal chemistry. CDD-1714, the initial three-building-block screening hit (molecular weight [MW] = 542.5 g/mol), was a potent inhibitor (inhibition constant [K i] = 20 nM). CDD-1713, a smaller two-building-block analog (MW = 353.3 g/mol) of CDD-1714, is a reversible covalent inhibitor of Mpro (K i = 45 nM) that binds in the protease pocket, has specificity over human proteases, and shows in vitro efficacy in a SARS-CoV-2 infectivity model. Subsequently, key regions of CDD-1713 that were necessary for inhibitory activity were identified and a potent (K i = 37 nM), smaller (MW = 323.4 g/mol), and metabolically more stable analog (CDD-1976) was generated. Thus, screening of DNA-encoded chemical libraries can accelerate the discovery of efficacious drug-like inhibitors of emerging viral disease targets.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus 3C Proteases/antagonists & inhibitors , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/genetics , Drug Discovery/methods , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus 3C Proteases/metabolism , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Enzyme Activation , Genetic Engineering , Humans , Models, Molecular , Molecular Conformation , Molecular Structure , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Virus Replication
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