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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335425

ABSTRACT

Background: With the COVID-19 epidemic, wearing a mask has become routine to prevent and control the virus's spread. Wearing masks for long periods can have various adverse effects on the human body, but little attention has been paid to the impact on olfaction. This study aimed to investigate whether wearing a mask affects healthcare workers' olfactory function and provide a reference for clinical olfactory research and mask wear regulations. Methods We recruited fifty-six healthcare workers and randomly divided them into two groups, wearing a Powered Air Purifying Respirator (PAPR, experiment group, N = 28) and an N95 mask (control group, N = 28) for 8h. Olfactory discrimination tests and threshold tests were performed before and after wearing the masks. SPSS 26.0 software was used for the statistical analyses. Results Current results suggested no statistical difference in the discrimination test scores between the PAPR Group (Z=-0.707 P = 0.480) and N95 Group (Z=-0.828 P = 0.408) before and after wearing the masks. The olfactory threshold test revealed a statistical difference in threshold scores before and after wearing the mask in the PAPR Group (Z= -2.595 P = 0.009) and N95 Group (Z= -2.120 P = 0.034). Both PAPRs and N95 masks reduce the sensitivity of healthcare workers to odors, with no significant difference between the two (χ 2  = 0.292, p = 0.589). Conclusion Wearing a mask affects the healthcare workers’ olfaction, especially odor sensitivity. Healthcare workers wearing masks have a higher olfactory threshold than before, whether wearing PAPRs or N95 masks. More attention needs to be paid to the effect of masks on the olfactory function.

2.
Environmental Pollution ; : 119308, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1796874

ABSTRACT

Numerous epidemiological studies have shown a close relationship between outdoor air pollution and increased risks for cancer, infection, and cardiopulmonary diseases. However, very few studies have investigated the potential health effects of coexposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) and bioaerosols through the transmission of infectious agents, particularly under the current circumstances of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. In this study, we aimed to identify urinary metabolite biomarkers that might serve as clinically predictive or diagnostic standards for relevant diseases in a real-time manner. We performed an unbiased gas/liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC/LC-MS) approach to detect urinary metabolites in 92 samples from young healthy individuals collected at three different time points after exposure to clean air, polluted ambient, or purified air, as well as two additional time points after air repollution or repurification. Subsequently, we compared the metabolomic profiles between the two time points using an integrated analysis, along with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes-enriched pathway and time-series analysis. We identified 33 and 155 differential metabolites (DMs) associated with PM and bioaerosol exposure using GC/LC–MS and follow-up analyses, respectively. Our findings suggest that 16-dehydroprogesterone and 4-hydroxyphenylethanol in urine samples may serve as potential biomarkers to predict or diagnose PM- or bioaerosol-related diseases, respectively. The results indicated apparent differences between PM- and bioaerosol-associated DMs at five different time points and revealed dynamic alterations in the urinary metabolic profiles of young healthy humans with cyclic exposure to clean and polluted air environments. Our findings will help in investigating the detrimental health effects of short-term coexposure to airborne PM and bioaerosols in a real-time manner and improve clinically predictive or diagnostic strategies for preventing air pollution-related diseases.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315184

ABSTRACT

Background: Numerous epidemiological studies showed close relationships of outdoor air pollution with increased risk of cancer, infection, and cardiopulmonary diseases. However, a very limited number of studies investigate the potential biomarkers of the co-exposures of particle matters (PM) and bioaerosols, especially under current circumstances of the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In the present study, we aimed to identify metabolic candidate biomarkers that are associated with co-exposure to PM and bioaerosols.Methods: We performed an unbiased gas/liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC/LC-MS) approach to detect urinary metabolites of 92 samples from young healthy individuals collected at three different time points with exposure to clean, polluted ambient, and purified air , followed by a cycling test after air re-pollution and re-purification with two additional time points. Subsequently, we compared metabolomic profiles in between two-time points via an integrated analysis, plus KEGG enriched pathway and time series analysis.Findings: We identified 33 and 155 differential metabolites (DMs) associated with PM and bioaerosol exposure, respectively. The results from KEGG data and time series analysis indicated significantly enriched pathways and dynamic alterations of metabolomic profiles, respectively. 16-Dehydroprogesterone and 4-Hydroxyphenylethanol in urine might be used as biomarkers for diagnosis of PM- or bioaerosol-relevant diseases.Interpretation: The present studies revealed dynamic alterations in urinary metabolites of young healthy humans with the cycling of the clean and polluted air environment. Our findings help to investigate detrimental health effects of airborne PM and bioaerosols in a real-time manner and improve clinically diagnostic tools for PM- and bioaerosol-related diseases.Funding Information: This work was financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China [NSFC Grant no. 81673958, 82074262, and 81828010];CAMS Innovation Fund for Medical Sciences [CIFMS 2016-I2M-3-013];The Drug Innovation Major Project of China [2018ZX09711001-007-002].Declaration of Interests: The authors declare no conflicts of interest in this work.Ethics Approval Statement: Our study was approved by the Ethical Committee of Guang'anmen Hospital. All recruited subjects provided written informed consent.

5.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(10): e25005, 2021 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138018

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The role of thoracic CT (computerized tomography) in monitoring disease course of COVID-19 is controversial. The purpose of this study is to investigate the risk factors and predictive value of deterioration on repeatedly performed CT scan during hospitalization.All COVID-19 patients treated in our isolation ward, from January 22, 2020 to February 7, 2020, were reviewed. Patients included were categorized into RD (Radiological Deterioration) group or NRD (No Radiological Deterioration) group according to the manifestation on the CT routinely performed during the hospitalization. All clinical data and CT images were analyzed.Forty three patients were included in our study. All are moderate cases with at least 4 CT scans each. Eighteen (42.9%) patients had radiological deteriorations which were all identified in CT2 (the first CT after admission). Patients in RD group had lower leukocyte count (P = .003), lymphocyte count (P = .030), and higher prevalence (P = .012) of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) at admission. NRD patients had a lower prevalence of reticulations (P = .034) on baseline CT (CT1, performed within 2 days before admission) and a longer duration between symptom onset and the time of CT2 (P < .01). There was no significant difference in hospital stay or fibrotic change on CT4 (follow-up CT scan performed 4 weeks after discharge) between 2 groups. Shorter duration between symptom onset and CT2 time (odds ratio [OR], 0.436; 95% confidence interval: 0.233-0.816; P < .01) and lower leukocyte count in baseline evaluation (OR, 0.316; 95% CI: 0.116-0.859; P < .05) were associated with increased odds of radiological deterioration on CT image during hospitalization.For moderate COVID-19 patients, the value of routinely performed CT during the treatment is limited. We recommend avoiding using CT as a routine monitor in moderate COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Disease Progression , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Clinical Deterioration , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Leukocyte Count , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Time-to-Treatment , Young Adult
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(45): e23044, 2020 Nov 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-930133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A new type of coronavirus (COVID-19), is spreading all over the world. Under the background of the comprehensive medical treatment and strict prevention and control in China, the number of discharged patients increased substantially. By the end of July, more than 80,000 patients had been cured and discharged from hospital in China. In order to effectively promote the full recovery of the patient's physical and mental functions and quality of life, gradually shift the emphasis of clinical work to convalescence therapy is very important, thus Chinese experts draw up Expert Consensus on Rehabilitation of Chinese Medicine for COVID-19. This systematic review and meta-analysis will assess studies of the effects of traditional Chinese exercise (TCE) for COVID-19 patients. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: We will search 6 English and 4 Chinese databases by 01, December 2020. After a series of screening, Randomized Clinic Trials (RCTs) will be included related to TCE for COVID-19. Two assessors will use the Cochrane bias risk assessment tool to assess the RCTs. Finally, the evidence grade of the results will be evaluated. RESULTS: This study will provide a reliable evidence for the selection of TCE therapies for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The results of this study will provide references for the selection of TCE treatment for COVID-19, and provide decision making references for clinical research. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020179095.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/rehabilitation , Exercise Therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/rehabilitation , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Qigong , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Tai Ji
7.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-1851

ABSTRACT

Background: Few studies have examined the association between treatment given time and clinical outcomes, which is indeed of great importance to clinical manage

8.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(6): 1138-1147, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-46197

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify markers associated with in-hospital death in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated pneumonia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 140 patients with moderate to critical COVID-19-associated pneumonia requiring oxygen supplementation admitted to the hospital from January 28, 2020, through February 28, 2020, and followed up through March 13, 2020, in Union Hospital, Wuhan, China. Oxygen saturation (SpO2) and other measures were tested as predictors of in-hospital mortality in survival analysis. RESULTS: Of 140 patients with COVID-19-associated pneumonia, 72 (51.4%) were men, with a median age of 60 years. Patients with SpO2 values of 90% or less were older and were more likely to be men, to have hypertension, and to present with dyspnea than those with SpO2 values greater than 90%. Overall, 36 patients (25.7%) died during hospitalization after median 14-day follow-up. Higher SpO2 levels after oxygen supplementation were associated with reduced mortality independently of age and sex (hazard ratio per 1-U SpO2, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.91 to 0.95; P<.001). The SpO2 cutoff value of 90.5% yielded 84.6% sensitivity and 97.2% specificity for prediction of survival. Dyspnea was also independently associated with death in multivariable analysis (hazard ratio, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.24 to 5.43; P=.01). CONCLUSION: In this cohort of patients with COVID-19, hypoxemia was independently associated with in-hospital mortality. These results may help guide the clinical management of patients with severe COVID-19, particularly in settings requiring strategic allocation of limited critical care resources. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chictr.org.cn Identifier: ChiCTR2000030852.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Hypoxia , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hypoxia/diagnosis , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Oxygen Consumption , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
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