Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
2.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-326544

ABSTRACT

Messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines have shown promise for COVID-19, but still suffer from the critical issue of chemical instability and degradation of the fragile mRNA molecule, which is a major obstacle in the storage, distribution, and efficacy of the vaccine. Previous work showed that thermodynamically more stable mRNAs have higher chemical stability, and this longer half-life, together with optimal codon usage, leads to greater protein expression. Therefore, we aim to design mRNAs with optimized folding stability and codon usage to improve their efficiency. However, the design space is prohibitively large, e.g., there are $\sim\!2.4 \times 10

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291507

ABSTRACT

Messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines have been successful for COVID-19, but still suffer from the critical issue of chemical instability and degradation of the mRNA molecule, which is a major obstacle in the storage, distribution, and efficiency of the vaccine. Previous work established a correlation between its chemical stability and thermodynamic folding stability, and longer half-life also leads to greater protein expression. Therefore, we aim to design mRNAs with optimal folding stability for more efficient mRNA vaccines. However, due to combinatorial explosion because of synonymous codons, the mRNA design space is prohibitively large, e.g., there are ~$2.4 \times 10

4.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 346, 2021 09 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437668

ABSTRACT

Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses to viral infection are a form of antibody regulated immune responses mediated through the Fc fragment. Whether severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) triggered ADCC responses contributes to COVID-19 disease development is currently not well understood. To understand the potential correlation between ADCC responses and COVID-19 disease development, we analyzed the ADCC activity and neutralizing antibody response in 255 individuals ranging from asymptomatic to fatal infections over 1 year post disease. ADCC was elicited by 10 days post-infection, peaked by 11-20 days, and remained detectable until 400 days post-infection. In general, patients with severe disease had higher ADCC activities. Notably, patients who had severe disease and recovered had higher ADCC activities than patients who had severe disease and deceased. Importantly, ADCC activities were mediated by a diversity of epitopes in SARS-COV-2-infected mice and induced to comparable levels against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern (VOCs) (B.1.1.7, B.1.351, and P.1) as that against the D614G mutant in human patients and vaccinated mice. Our study indicates anti-SARS-CoV-2 ADCC as a major trait of COVID-19 patients with various conditions, which can be applied to estimate the extra-neutralization level against COVID-19, especially lethal COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Animals , Cell Line, Tumor , Female , Humans , Male , Mice , Middle Aged
5.
Signal Transduct Target Ther ; 6(1): 213, 2021 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249203

ABSTRACT

Although inoculation of COVID-19 vaccines has rolled out globally, there is still a critical need for safe and effective vaccines to ensure fair and equitable supply for all countries. Here, we report on the development of a highly efficacious mRNA vaccine, SW0123 that is composed of sequence-modified mRNA encoding the full-length SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein packaged in core-shell structured lipopolyplex (LPP) nanoparticles. SW0123 is easy to produce using a large-scale microfluidics-based apparatus. The unique core-shell structured nanoparticle facilitates vaccine uptake and demonstrates a high colloidal stability, and a desirable biodistribution pattern with low liver targeting effect upon intramuscular administration. Extensive evaluations in mice and nonhuman primates revealed strong immunogenicity of SW0123, represented by induction of Th1-polarized T cell responses and high levels of antibodies that were capable of neutralizing not only the wild-type SARS-CoV-2, but also a panel of variants including D614G and N501Y variants. In addition, SW0123 conferred effective protection in both mice and non-human primates upon SARS-CoV-2 challenge. Taken together, SW0123 is a promising vaccine candidate that holds prospects for further evaluation in humans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Mice , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/antagonists & inhibitors , Th1 Cells/immunology , Th1 Cells/virology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/therapeutic use , Viral Vaccines/immunology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL