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2.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 759152, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497097

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can present with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. However, the prevalence of GI symptoms and their association with outcomes remain controversial in COVID-19 patients. Methods: All COVID-19 patients consecutively admitted to the Wuhan Huoshenshan hospital from February 2020 to April 2020 were collected. Disease severity and outcomes were compared between COVID-19 patients with and without GI symptoms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association of GI symptoms with the composite endpoint and death in COVID-19 patients. A composite endpoint was defined as transfer to intensive care unit, requirement of mechanical ventilation, and death. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Results: Overall, 2,552 COVID-19 patients were included. The prevalence of GI symptoms was 21.0% (537/2,552). Diarrhea (8.9%, 226/2,552) was the most common GI symptom. Patients with GI symptoms had significantly higher proportions of severe COVID-19 and worse outcomes than those without. Univariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that GI symptoms were significantly associated with the composite endpoint (OR = 2.426, 95% CI = 1.608-3.661; P < 0.001) and death (OR = 2.137, 95% CI = 1.209-3.778; P = 0.009). After adjusting for age, sex, and severe/critical COVID-19, GI symptoms were still independently associated with the composite endpoint (OR = 2.029, 95% CI = 1.294-3.182; P = 0.002), but not death (OR = 1.726, 95% CI = 0.946-3.150; P = 0.075). According to the type of GI symptoms, GI bleeding was an independent predictor of the composite endpoint (OR = 8.416, 95% CI = 3.465-20.438, P < 0.001) and death (OR = 6.640, 95% CI = 2.567-17.179, P < 0.001), but not other GI symptoms (i.e., diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, nausea and/or vomiting, constipation, acid reflux and/or heartburn, or abdominal pain). Conclusion: GI symptoms are common in COVID-19 patients and may be associated with their worse outcomes. Notably, such a negative impact of GI symptoms on the outcomes should be attributed to GI bleeding.

3.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(5): 5069-5083, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identification of risk factors for poor prognosis of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is necessary to enable the risk stratification and modify the patient's management. Thus, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the in-hospital mortality and risk factors of death in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: All studies were searched via the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP, and Wanfang databases. The in-hospital mortality of COVID-19 patients was pooled. Odds ratios (ORs) or mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for evaluation of risk factors. RESULTS: A total of 80 studies were included with a pooled in-hospital mortality of 14% (95% CI: 12.2-15.9%). Older age (MD =13.32, 95% CI: 10.87-15.77; P<0.00001), male (OR =1.66, 95% CI: 1.37-2.01; P<0.00001), hypertension (OR =2.67, 95% CI: 2.08-3.43; P<0.00001), diabetes (OR =2.14, 95% CI: 1.76-2.6; P<0.00001), chronic respiratory disease (OR =3.55, 95% CI: 2.65-4.76; P<0.00001), chronic heart disease/cardiovascular disease (OR =3.15, 95% CI: 2.43-4.09; P<0.00001), elevated levels of high-sensitive cardiac troponin I (MD =66.65, 95% CI: 16.94-116.36; P=0.009), D-dimer (MD =4.33, 95% CI: 2.97-5.68; P<0.00001), C-reactive protein (MD =48.03, 95% CI: 27.79-68.27; P<0.00001), and a decreased level of albumin at admission (MD =-3.98, 95% CI: -5.75 to -2.22; P<0.0001) are associated with higher risk of death. Patients who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (OR =62.85, 95% CI: 29.45-134.15; P<0.00001), acute cardiac injury (OR =25.16, 95% CI: 6.56-96.44; P<0.00001), acute kidney injury (OR =22.86, 95% CI: 4.60-113.66; P=0.0001), and septic shock (OR =24.09, 95% CI: 4.26-136.35; P=0.0003) might have a higher in-hospital mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced age, male, comorbidities, increased levels of acute inflammation or organ damage indicators, and complications are associated with the risk of mortality in COVID-19 patients, and should be integrated into the risk stratification system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , China , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Jpn J Nurs Sci ; 18(2): e12398, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-950994

ABSTRACT

AIM: This research aimed to shed light on the relationship between the sociodemographic characteristics of front-line medical workers and their anxiety and depression, to provide the basis and reference for targeted mental health education and for relevant departments to formulate appropriate policies during the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: This study adopted a convenient sampling method and examined the psychological status of 150 front-line medical workers from Zhejiang Province with questionnaire surveys using the Hamilton Anxiety and Depression Scale. RESULTS: The participants had severe anxiety and depression; the top three items under the category of anxiety were genitourinary symptoms, behavior at interview, and respiratory symptoms, whereas the top three items under depression were feelings of guilt, weight loss, and retardation. Among all personal data, the following factors influenced anxiety, in decreasing order: degree of suspicion of being infected when showing associated symptoms, degree of fear of yourself and your family being infected, and the affiliated hospital (p < .05). As for depression, the factors were the degree of suspicion of being infected when showing associated symptoms and the degree of fear of yourself and your family being infected (p < .05). CONCLUSION: This study revealed that front-line medical staff presented symptoms of anxiety and depression when dealing with the COVID-19 outbreak and the factors influencing their psychological stress. Guiding policies and psychological interventions is crucial to maintaining their psychological well-being. Different measures may be implemented to solve this problem.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Medical Staff , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22177, 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787423

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorder places a heavy burden in the clinical treatment of patients of COVID-19. Acupuncture is a recommended treatment of COVID-19 in China, and clinical researches showed the effectiveness of acupuncture. We will conduct this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture for COVID-19. METHODS: Electronic databases of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Biomedical literature Database (CBM), Chinese Scientific and Journal Database (VIP), and Wan Fang database (Wanfang) will be searched for randomized controlled trials of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19 from inception of the database to August 10, 2020. Two reviewers will screen studies, collect information independently. We will utilize RevMan 5.3 for meta-analysis. RESULTS: We will publish the study result to a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: This study will contribute to provide high-quality evidence of acupuncture for anxiety disorder of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acupuncture Therapy/methods , Anxiety Disorders/therapy , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Treatment Outcome
8.
Hepatol Int ; 14(5): 621-637, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is ongoing. Except for lung injury, it is possible that COVID-19 patients develop liver injury. Thus, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the incidence, risk factors, and prognosis of abnormal liver biochemical tests in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), VIP, and Wanfang databases were searched. The incidence of abnormal liver biochemical tests, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), total bilirubin (TBIL), and albumin (ALB), was pooled. Risk ratio (RR) was calculated to explore the association of abnormal liver biochemical tests with severity and prognosis of COVID-19 patients. RESULTS: Forty-five studies were included. The pooled incidence of any abnormal liver biochemical indicator at admission and during hospitalization was 27.2% and 36%, respectively. Among the abnormal liver biochemical indicators observed at admission, abnormal ALB was the most common, followed by GGT, AST, ALT, TBIL, and ALP (39.8%, 35.8%, 21.8%, 20.4%, 8.8%, and 4.7%). Among the abnormal liver biochemical indicators observed during hospitalization, abnormal ALT was more common than AST and TBIL (38.4%, 28.1%, and 23.2%). Severe and/or critical patients had a significantly higher pooled incidence of abnormal liver biochemical indicators at admission than mild and/or moderate patients. Non-survivors had a significantly higher incidence of abnormal liver biochemical indicators than survivors (RR = 1.34, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Abnormal liver biochemical tests are common in COVID-19 patients. Liver biochemical indicators are closely related to the severity and prognosis of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Hepatic Insufficiency , Liver Function Tests/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Hepatic Insufficiency/diagnosis , Hepatic Insufficiency/epidemiology , Hepatic Insufficiency/virology , Humans , Incidence , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Risk Assessment/methods
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