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1.
Ann Transl Med ; 10(9): 505, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822668

ABSTRACT

Background: New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), and British Medical Journal (BMJ) are collectively known as "the Top Four Medical Journals (TFMJ)" in China. Through the analysis of Chinese scholars' publications in the TFMJ in the recent 10 years, this study aimed to clarify the current situation of high-quality medical research conducted by Chinese scholars and institutions. Methods: Data were retrieved and downloaded manually from PubMed (2011-2020). Information on the publication year, journal, author, affiliation, and citation, etc. were extracted and analyzed using R software. Results: A total of 761 articles were involved in the final analysis. The number of articles published by Chinese scholars in the TFMJ was 135/29,942 (0.45%) in BMJ, 124/14,033 (0.88%) in JAMA, 314/16,117 (1.94%) in Lancet, and 188/15,242 (1.23%) in NEJM (P<0.001). Besides, the letter was the main research type, which was up to 44.54%, and the original research only accounted for 17.47%. The most popular subspecialty and subject were infectious diseases and COVID-19, respectively. The most productive researcher was Chen Wang, and Bin Cao was the most cited Chinese scholar. The most productive institute was Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College. The most cited study was "Clinical features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus in Wuhan, China". Conclusions: The presence of Chinese scholars in the TFMJ has grown, but there is still much room to improve. A Matthew effect in China's high-level scientific research was demonstrated.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318617

ABSTRACT

Background: To analyze the clinical features and the possible risk factors of secondary infection, and explore their impact on prognosis of COVID-19. Methods: : A total of 165 severe and critical hospitalized patients diagnosed with COVID-19 were included. The clinical characteristics, laboratory tests, imaging data, secondary infections and outcomes were analyzed. Results: : The mean age of total patients was (57.3±15.2) years, of which 111 were males (67.3%). 108 cases were with basic diseases (65.5%), and 1 death (0.6%). The secondary infection rate in critical patients was significantly higher than in severe patients ( P <0.05). The secondary infections were mainly lung infections. The pathogens were principally Burkholderia multivorans, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The recovery rate of 28 days in the infected group was significantly lower than that in the non-infected group ( p < 0.001).The utilization rate and usage time of invasive ventilator, and deep vein catheterization, catheter indwelling and ECMO were the risk factors for the secondary infected patients. Conclusion: Secondary infection is an extremely common complication in critically ill patients and a trigger point for exacerbation of the disease. An effective control on the secondary infection will do good to the prognosis of COVID-19 patients.

3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(28): e26538, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494086

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation has been associated with poor patient prognosis. In this study, we assessed the effects of different drugs and cardiac injury on QTc interval prolongation in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).The study cohort consisted of 395 confirmed COVID-19 cases from the Wuhan Union Hospital West Campus. All hospitalized patients were treated with chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine (CQ/HCQ), lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r), quinolones, interferon, Arbidol, or Qingfei Paidu decoction (QPD) and received at least 1 electrocardiogram after drug administration.Fifty one (12.9%) patients exhibited QTc prolongation (QTc ≥ 470 ms). QTc interval prolongation was associated with COVID-19 severity and mortality (both P < .001). Administration of CQ/HCQ (odds ratio [OR], 2.759; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.318-5.775; P = .007), LPV/r (OR, 2.342; 95% CI, 1.152-4.760; P = .019), and quinolones (OR, 2.268; 95% CI, 1.171-4.392; P = .015) increased the risk of QTc prolongation. In contrast, the administration of Arbidol, interferon, or QPD did not increase the risk of QTc prolongation. Notably, patients treated with QPD had a shorter QTc duration than those without QPD treatment (412.10 [384.39-433.77] vs 420.86 [388.19-459.58]; P = .042). The QTc interval was positively correlated with the levels of cardiac biomarkers (creatine kinase-MB fraction [rho = 0.14, P = .016], high-sensitivity troponin I [rho = .22, P < .001], and B-type natriuretic peptide [rho = 0.27, P < .001]).In conclusion, QTc prolongation was associated with COVID-19 severity and mortality. The risk of QTc prolongation was higher in patients receiving CQ/HCQ, LPV/r, and quinolones. QPD had less significant effects on QTc prolongation than other antiviral agents.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Long QT Syndrome/mortality , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/virology , Chloroquine/adverse effects , Drug Therapy, Combination , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Electrocardiography , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Indoles/adverse effects , Interferons/adverse effects , Long QT Syndrome/chemically induced , Lopinavir/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Quinolones/adverse effects , Retrospective Studies , Ritonavir/adverse effects , Severity of Illness Index
4.
J Electrocardiol ; 65: 96-101, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046325

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to impact populations around the globe. Information regarding the incidences and implications of arrhythmias in COVID-19 is limited. METHODS: A total of 463 patients with COVID-19 and who had at least one electrocardiogram recording from February 1 to March 19, 2020, in Wuhan Union Hospital were enrolled in the study. RESULTS: Arrhythmias occurred in 85 of 463 (18.4%) patients: atrial arrhythmias in 10.2%, junctional arrhythmias in 0.2%, ventricular arrhythmias in 3.5%, and conduction block in 7.3%. Compared with patients without arrhythmias, those with arrhythmias had higher mortality, both during the time from symptom onset (p < 0.001) and from admission to follow-up (p < 0.001). The frequencies of severe COVID-19 (44.7% vs. 21.2%; p < 0.001) and death (25.9% vs. 10.1%; p < 0.001) were higher in patients with arrhythmias than in those without arrhythmias. Atrial arrhythmias and ventricular arrhythmias could predict severity and mortality, their odds ratios (OR) were 4.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.35 to 8.40), 5.80 (95% CI 1.89 to 17.76) respectively for severity, and were 3.51 (95% CI 1.74 to 7.08), 3.41 (95% CI 1.13 to 10.24) respectively for mortality. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-10 were associated with the occurrence of arrhythmias (all p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Arrhythmias were significantly associated with COVID-19 severity and mortality. Atrial arrhythmia was the most frequent arrhythmia type. IL-6 and IL-10 levels can predict the risk of arrhythmias in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Arrhythmias, Cardiac/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Aged , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/diagnosis , Arrhythmias, Cardiac/virology , China/epidemiology , Electrocardiography , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
5.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-745

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 is causing a worldwide health crisis. We aimed to present clinical and CT features for a cohort of patients in Henan, China with more foc

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