Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
1.
Huanjing yu Zhiye Yixue = Journal of Environmental & Occupational Medicine ; 39(8):871, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030329

ABSTRACT

[Background] Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 epidemic, staff of the centers for disease control and prevention (CDC) have been burdened with heavy epidemic prevention control, and excessive occupational stress can cause depression and other psychological problems. [Objective] To explore the status of occupational stress, resilience, and depression of CDC staff and potential relationships between them. [Methods] From December 2020 to April 2021, a survey was conducted at provincial and municipal levels, and the stratified cluster sampling method was used at county (district) level to select a total of 3514 samples. Their occupational stress, resilience, and depression status were evaluated using the Chinese Effort-Reward Imbalance Scale (ERI), the Chinese Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Independent samplet test, analysis of variance, χ2 test, Pearson correlation analysis, and mediation test (structural equation model) were conducted. [Results] The positive rate of occupational stress was 34.29% in the CDC staff, the resilience score was 66.28±15.32, and the positive rate of depression was 48.58%. Significant differences were found in the positive rates of occupational stress among different groups of gender, age, education background, marital status, administrative duty, weekly exercise frequency, chronic disease prevalence, and participation in epidemic control (P<0.05);in the resilience scores among different groups of gender, age, administrative duty, weekly exercise frequency, chronic disease prevalence, and participation in epidemic control (P<0.05);in the positive rates of depression among different groups of gender, age, educational background, personal monthly income, weekly exercise frequency, chronic disease prevalence, and participation in epidemic control (P<0.05). Occupational stress was negatively correlated with resilience (r=−0.165,P<0.01). Resilience was negatively correlated with depression (r=−0.383,P<0.01). Occupational stress was positively correlated with depression (r=0.343, P<0.01). The structural equation embracing a partial mediating effect of resilience on the relationship occupational stress and depression was established, and the partial mediating effect was 0.039, accounting for 10.46% of the total effect. [Conclusion] High positive rates of occupational stress, reduced resilience, and depression are shown among CDC staff in the context of the COVID-19 epidemic, and resilience partially mediates the effect of occupational stress on depression. The study findings suggest that improving resilience may reduce occupational stress and depression in CDC staff.

2.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 12: 953027, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022658

ABSTRACT

Quick differentiation of the circulating variants and the emerging recombinant variants of SARS-CoV-2 is essential to monitor their transmission. However, the widely used gene sequencing method is time-consuming and costly when facing the viral recombinant variants, because partial or whole genome sequencing is required. Allele-specific real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) represents a quick and cost-effective method in SNP genotyping and has been successfully applied for SARS-CoV-2 variant screening. In the present study, we developed a panel of 3 multiplex allele-specific qRT-PCR assays targeting 12 key differential mutations for quick differentiation of SARS-CoV-2 recombinant variants (XD and XE) and Omicron subvariants (BA.1 and BA.2). Two parallel multiplex qRT-PCR reactions were designed to separately target the protype allele and the mutated allele of the four mutations in each allele-specific qRT-PCR assay. The variation of Cp values (ΔCp) between the two multiplex qRT-PCR reactions was applied for mutation determination. The developed multiplex allele-specific qRT-PCR assays exhibited outstanding analytical sensitivities (with limits of detection [LoDs] of 2.97-27.43 copies per reaction), wide linear detection ranges (107-100 copies per reaction), good amplification efficiencies (82% to 95%), good reproducibility (Coefficient of Variations (CVs) < 5% in both intra-assay and inter-assay tests) and clinical performances (99.5%-100% consistency with Sanger sequencing). The developed multiplex allele-specific qRT-PCR assays in this study provide an alternative tool for quick differentiation of SARS-CoV-2 recombinant variants (XD and XE) and Omicron subvariants (BA.1 and BA.2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Alleles , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , RNA, Viral/genetics , Reproducibility of Results , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315208

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread widely from China to the world. Although the viral genome has been well characterized, the evolutionary origin and global transmission dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 remain poorly investigated. To address this, we retrieved 313 SARS-CoV-2 genomes from the GISAID database (https://www.gisaid.org), from which 99 genomes generated from original clinical specimens with exact collection dates from 16 countries were selected and enrolled for Bayesian phylodynamic analysis. Here we show that the time to the Most Recent Common Ancestor (tMRCA) of SARS-CoV-2 is Dec 11, 2019 (95%HPD, Nov 21 - Dec 24). Two clades of global circulating strains of SARS-CoV-2 were suggested by Bayesian Maximum Clade Credibility (MCC) tree. The USA circulating strains of SARS-CoV-2 seemed to be from both of the two clades, the UK and Australia circulating strains were from Clade 1, the circulating strains in Singapore, Japan, Germany, France, and Italy were from Clade 2. Although we have not found any obvious bottle-neck-effect from the Bayesian Skyline Plot of the viral population dynamics reconstruction, a sharp reduction of the lower 95% HPD of the relative genetic diversity was observed from Feb 5, 2020, suggesting a possible initiation of a bottle-neck-effect. Thirteen (6 synonymous and 7 non-synonymous) mutations in the viral genome were observed, including two clade-specific mutations (C8782T and T1844C in Clade 1 rather than Clade 2) and eleven sub-clade specific mutations. All of the observed mutations occurred in the USA circulating strains, except one mutation T18488C only occurred in the UK circulating strains. A non-synonymous mutation in the 3’-UTR was also observed, suggesting an altered RNA replication capacity of SARS-CoV-2. We thus came to the conclusion that continuous evolution occurred in almost all regions of the SARS-CoV-2 genome and potentially in a country-specific manner. Further efforts on monitoring the genomic mutations of SARS-CoV-2 from different countries are recommended.

4.
Journal of Intensive Medicine ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1665214

ABSTRACT

Background The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing pandemic since December 2019. Invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) is essential for the management of COVID-19 with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aimed to assess the impact of compliance with a respiratory decision support system on the outcomes of patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS who required IMV. Methods In this retrospective, single-center, case series, 46 patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS who required IMV at Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, China, from January 8, 2020, to March 24, 2020, with the final follow-up date of April 20, 2020, were included. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and management information were collected and analyzed. Compliance with the respiratory support decision system was documented, and its relationship with 28-day mortality was evaluated. Results The median age of the 46 patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS requiring IMV was 68.5 years, and 31 were men. The partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ratio at intensive care unit (ICU) admission was 104 mmHg. The median total length of IMV was 12.0 (interquartile range [IQR], 6.0–27.3) days, and the median respiratory support decision score was 11.0 (IQR, 7.8–16.0). To 28 days after ICU admission, 18 (39.1%) patients died. Survivors had a significantly higher respiratory support decision score than non-survivors (15.0 [10.3–17.0] vs. 8.5 (6.0–10.3), P = 0.001). Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to assess the discrimination of respiratory support decision score to 28-day mortality, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.796 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.657–0.934, P = 0.001) and the cut-off was 11.5 (sensitivity = 0.679, specificity = 0.889). Patients with a higher score (>11.5) were more likely to survive at 28 days after ICU admission (log-rank test, P < 0.001). Conclusions For severe COVID-19-associated ARDS with IMV, following the respiratory support decision and assessing completion would improve the progress of ventilation. With a decision score of >11.5, the mortality at 28 days after ICU admission showed an obvious decrease.

5.
Shock ; 56(2): 200-205, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1316852

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We used lung ultrasonography to identify features of COVID-19 pneumonia and to evaluate the prognostic value. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We performed lung ultrasonography on 48 COVID-19 patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) (Wuhan, China) using a 12-zone method. The associations between lung ultrasonography score, PaO2/FiO2, APACHE II, SOFA, and PaCO2 with 28-day mortality were analyzed and the receiver operator characteristic curve was plotted. RESULTS: 25.9% areas in all scanning zones presented with B7 lines and 23.5% with B3 lines (B-pattern) on lung ultrasonography; 13% areas with confluent B lines (B-pattern), 24.9% in areas with consolidations, and 9.9% in areas with A lines. Pleural effusion was observed in 2.8% of areas. Lung ultrasonography score was negatively correlated with PaO2/FiO2 (n = 48, r = -0.498, P < 0.05) and positively correlated with APACHE II (n = 48, r = 0.435, P < 0.05). Lung ultrasonography score was independently associated with 28-day mortality. The areas under receiver operator characteristic curves of lung ultrasonography score were 0.735 (95% CI: 0.586-0.844). The sensitivity, specificity, and cutoff values were 0.833, 0.722, and 22.5, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Lung ultrasonography could be used to assess the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia, and it could also reveal the pathological signs of the disease. The lung ultrasonography score on ICU admission was independently related to the ICU 28-day mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Ultrasonography/methods , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2
6.
China CDC Wkly ; 3(19): 401-404, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1140892

ABSTRACT

WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THIS TOPIC?: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is widespread globally. In China, COVID-19 has been well controlled and has appeared only in importation-related cases. Local epidemics occur sporadically in China and have been contained relatively quickly. WHAT IS ADDED BY THIS REPORT?: Epidemiological investigation with genome sequence traceability analysis showed that the first case of COVID-19 in Nangong City acquired infection from a confirmed case from Shijiazhuang City; infection subsequently led to 76 local cases. All cases were associated with the index case, and most were located in Fenggong Street and did not spread outside of Nangong City. The main routes of transmission were family clusters, intra-unit transmission, and nosocomial transmission. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE?: This study highlights new techniques for rapidly tracing cases and identifying COVID-19 transmission chains. The different epidemiological characteristics in Nangong City, from the earliest stages of the outbreak, suggest that allocation of health sources for prevention and treatment were reasonable. Preventing transmission within medical institutions and isolation facilities and strengthening management in the community should be priorities for COVID-19 control during a city lockdown.

7.
Tianjin Medical Journal ; 48(10):916-919, 2020.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-976574

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the risk factors of subsequent bacterial infection in patients with novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

8.
J Virol Methods ; 288: 114030, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-951217

ABSTRACT

Quick and accurate detection of SARS-CoV-2 is critical for COVID-19 control. Dozens of real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) assays have been developed to meet the urgent need of COVID-19 control. However, methodological comparisons among the developed qRT-PCR assays are limited. In the present study, we evaluated the sensitivity, specificity, amplification efficiency, and linear detection ranges of three qRT-PCR assays, including the assays developed by our group (IPBCAMS), and the assays recommended by WHO and China CDC (CCDC). The three qRT-PCR assays exhibited similar sensitivities, with the limit of detection (LoD) at about 10 copies per reaction (except the ORF 1b gene assay in CCDC assays with a LoD at about 100 copies per reaction). No cross reaction with other respiratory viruses were observed in all of the three qRT-PCR assays. Wide linear detection ranges from 106 to 101 copies per reaction and acceptable reproducibility were obtained. By using 25 clinical specimens, the N gene assay of IPBCAMS assays and CCDC assays performed better (with detection rates of 92 % and 100 %, respectively) than that of the WHO assays (with a detection rate of 60 %), and the ORF 1b gene assay in IPBCAMS assays performed better (with a detection rate of 64 %) than those of the WHO assays and the CCDC assays (with detection rates of 48 % and 20 %, respectively). In conclusion, the N gene assays of CCDC assays and IPBCAMS assays and the ORF 1b gene assay of IPBCAMS assays were recommended for qRT-PCR screening of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19 Testing/standards , Humans , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Reproducibility of Results , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Sensitivity and Specificity
9.
Biosaf Health ; 2(4): 232-237, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-664504

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Wuhan, China, was caused by a novel coronavirus (CoV), named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The rapid detection of viral nucleic acids is critical for the early identification of infected cases. We have developed two TaqMan real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays to detect SARS-CoV-2. The designed primers target the nucleocapsid (N) and open reading frame (ORF) 1b gene regions, where the probes discriminate SARS-CoV-2 from other human and animal CoVs. The sensitivities are one genomic copy per reaction for the N gene assay and ten copies for the ORF 1b gene assay. The overall linear detection ranges are 1-106 and 10-106 copies per reaction for the N gene assay and the ORF 1b gene assay, respectively. Surveillance of 23 suspected COVID-19 patients demonstrated that SARS-CoV-2 could be detected from 100% (23/23) and 62.5% (16/23) of clinical specimens by the N gene assay and the ORF 1b gene assay, respectively. All of the samples not detected by the ORF 1b gene assay were throat swabs, indicating a lower viral load in the upper respiratory tract and the relatively lower sensitivity of the ORF 1b gene assay. The assays developed in the present study offer alternative diagnostic tests for COVID-19.

10.
Epidemiol Infect ; 148: e125, 2020 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615326

ABSTRACT

The clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 were analysed to determine the factors influencing the prognosis and virus shedding time to facilitate early detection of disease progression. Logistic regression analysis was used to explore the relationships among prognosis, clinical characteristics and laboratory indexes. The predictive value of this model was assessed with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, calibration and internal validation. The viral shedding duration was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and the prognostic factors were analysed by univariate log-rank analysis and the Cox proportional hazards model. A retrospective study was carried out with patients with COVID-19 in Tianjin, China. A total of 185 patients were included, 27 (14.59%) of whom were severely ill at the time of discharge and three (1.6%) of whom died. Our findings demonstrate that patients with an advanced age, diabetes, a low PaO2/FiO2 value and delayed treatment should be carefully monitored for disease progression to reduce the incidence of severe disease. Hypoproteinaemia and the fever duration warrant special attention. Timely interventions in symptomatic patients and a time from symptom onset to treatment <4 days can shorten the duration of viral shedding.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Virus Shedding/physiology , Adult , Analysis of Variance , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Hypoproteinemia , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Proportional Hazards Models , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
11.
J Clin Virol ; 127: 104364, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-98040

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In late December 2019, an outbreak of acute respiratory illness, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), emerged in Wuhan, China. We aimed to study the epidemiology, clinical features and short-term outcomes of patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. METHODS: We performed a single center, retrospective case series study in 221 patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia at a university hospital, including 55 severe patients and 166 non-severe patients, from January 2, 2020 to February 10, 2020. RESULTS: Of the 221 patients with COVID-19, the median age was 55.0 years and 48.9% were male and only 8 (3.6%) patients had a history of exposure to the Huanan Seafood Market. Compared to the non-severe pneumonia patients, the median age of the severe patients was significantly older, and they were more likely to have chronic comorbidities. Most common symptoms in severe patients were high fever, anorexia and dyspnea. On admission, 33.0% patients showed leukopenia and 73.8% showed lymphopenia. In addition, the severe patients suffered a higher rate of co-infections with bacteria or fungus and they were more likely to developing complications. As of February 15, 2020, 19.0% patients had been discharged and 5.4% patients died. 80% of severe cases received ICU (intensive care unit) care, and 52.3% of them transferred to the general wards due to relieved symptoms, and the mortality rate of severe patients in ICU was 20.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with elder age, chronic comorbidities, blood leukocyte/lymphocyte count, procalcitonin level, co-infection and severe complications might increase the risk of poor clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Anorexia/epidemiology , Anorexia/virology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coinfection/microbiology , Coinfection/virology , Comorbidity , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/virology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/virology , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL