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1.
Pathogens ; 11(4):452, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1785869

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many general hospitals have been transformed into designated infectious disease care facilities, where a large number of patients with COVID-19 infections have been treated and discharged. With declines in the number of hospitalizations, a major question for our healthcare systems, especially for these designated facilities, is how to safely resume hospital function after these patients have been discharged. Here, we take a designated COVID-19-care facility in Wuhan, China, as an example to share our experience in resuming hospital function while ensuring the safety of patients and medical workers. After more than 1200 patients with COVID-19 infections were discharged in late March, 2020, our hospital resumed function by setting up a three-level hospital infection management system with four grades of risk of exposure. Moreover, we also took measures to ensure the safety of medical personnel in different departments including clinics, wards, and operation rooms. After all patients with COVID-19 infections were discharged, during the five months of regular function from April to September in 2020, no positive cases have been found among more than 40,000 people in our hospital, including hospital staff and patients.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315212

ABSTRACT

Background: Multiorgan damage by SARS-CoV-2 results in alterations of many clinical measures associated with mortality of COVID-19. This research discussed the pioneering pathogenicity factors that lead to the extensive damage elusive. Objectives: A cohort of COVID-19 patients. Methods: : We conducted a correlational analysis of hospital outcomes with an independent cohort of COVID-19 patients and we also presented a death case to illustrate for time course of immune cell density. Results: : The results showed that dysregulated immune cell densities were correlated with hospitalization duration before death, not before discharge. High neutrophil densities allowed sorting out one third of total death cases while a density of less than 70% of the white blood cells allowed sorting out 70% of surviving cases. Conclusion: Collectively surged neutrophil was a top trigger for mortality in patients with COVID-19.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315211

ABSTRACT

Background: Worldwide spread of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has made hundreds of thousands people sick and fortunately many of them have been treated and discharged. However, it remains unclear how well the discharged patients were recovering. Chest CT scan, with demonstrated high sensitivity to COVID-19, was used here to examine clinical manifestations in patients at discharge. Methods: This study registered retrospectively single-center case series of 180 discharged patients, all confirmed with COVID-19 at Wuhan Red Cross Hospital in Wuhan, China. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, laboratory and treatment data were collected. CT imaging features of absorption vs progressive stage were compared and analyzed. Results: Five pulmonary lobes were affected in 54 (30%) of the 180 patients at the absorption stage, comparing to 66% of them at the progressive stage ( P=1.45×10 -11 ). Forty five (25%) patients had pleural effusion on admission and 13 of them still carried hydrothorax when discharged as per standard discharge criteria( P=4.48×10 -6 ). Besides, compared with those at progressive stage, 97 (54%) discharged patients had interlobular thickening ( P=6.95×10 -3 ) and 43% of them still presented adjacent pleura thickening ( P=5.58×10 -5 ). The median total CT score of discharged patients at absorption stage was lower than progressive stage (3 vs 12.5 ). The median total CT score recovery rate was 67% (range, 0-100%) and 139 (77%) patients showed less than 90% improvement at discharge. Conclusions: A majority (77%) of the discharged patients had not recovered completely. The current discharge criteria may need to include 90% or higher CT score-based recovery rate.Authors Jingwen Li, Xi Long, Fang Fang, and Xuefei Lv contributed equally to this work.Authors Zhicheng Lin and Nian Xiong are joint last coauthors.

4.
Heart Surg Forum ; 24(5): E906-E908, 2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502125

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly contagious respiratory disease that threatens global health. During the pandemic period of COVID-19, the task for prevention in the general ward of cardiovascular surgery is fairly arduous. The present study intends to summarize our experience with infection control, including ward setting, admission procedures, personnel management, health education, and so on, to provide references for clinical management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/standards , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Guidelines as Topic , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patients' Rooms/standards , Tertiary Care Centers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/surgery , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
NPJ Digit Med ; 4(1): 124, 2021 Aug 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360212

ABSTRACT

Most prior studies focused on developing models for the severity or mortality prediction of COVID-19 patients. However, effective models for recovery-time prediction are still lacking. Here, we present a deep learning solution named iCOVID that can successfully predict the recovery-time of COVID-19 patients based on predefined treatment schemes and heterogeneous multimodal patient information collected within 48 hours after admission. Meanwhile, an interpretable mechanism termed FSR is integrated into iCOVID to reveal the features greatly affecting the prediction of each patient. Data from a total of 3008 patients were collected from three hospitals in Wuhan, China, for large-scale verification. The experiments demonstrate that iCOVID can achieve a time-dependent concordance index of 74.9% (95% CI: 73.6-76.3%) and an average day error of 4.4 days (95% CI: 4.2-4.6 days). Our study reveals that treatment schemes, age, symptoms, comorbidities, and biomarkers are highly related to recovery-time predictions.

6.
Int J Med Sci ; 18(14): 3140-3149, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325965

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused over 3.8 million deaths globally. Up to date, the number of death in 2021 is more than that in 2020 globally. Here, we aimed to compare clinical characteristics of deceased patients and recovered patients, and analyze the risk factors of death to help reduce mortality of COVID-19. Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 2719 COVID-19 patients were enrolled, including 109 deceased patients and 2610 recovered patients. Medical records of all patients were collected between February 4, 2020, and April 7, 2020. Clinical characteristics, laboratory indices, treatments, and deep-learning system- assessed lung lesion volumes were analyzed. The effect of different medications on survival time of fatal cases was also investigated. Results: The deceased patients were older (73 years versus 60 years) and had a male predominance. Nausea (10.1% versus 4.1%) and dyspnea (54.1% versus 39.2%) were more common in deceased patients. The proportion of patients with comorbidities in deceased patients was significantly higher than those in recovered patients. The median times from hospital admission to outcome in deceased patients and recovered patients were 9 days and 13 days, respectively. Patients with severe or critical COVID-19 were more frequent in deceased group. Leukocytosis (11.35×109/L versus 5.60×109/L) and lymphocytopenia (0.52×109/L versus 1.58×109/L) were shown in patients who died. The level of prothrombin time, activated partial prothrombin time, D-dimer, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, urea, creatinine, creatine kinase, glucose, brain natriuretic peptide, and inflammatory indicators were significantly higher in deceased patients than in recovered patients. The volumes of ground-glass, consolidation, total lesions and total lung in all patients were quantified. Complications were more common in deceased patients than in recovered patients; respiratory failure (57.8%), septic shock (36.7%), and acute respiratory distress syndrome (26.6%) were the most common complications in patients who died. Many treatments were more frequent in deceased patients, such as antibiotic therapy (88.1% versus 53.7%), glucocorticoid treatment (70.6% versus 11.0%), intravenous immunoglobin treatment (36.6% versus 4.9%), invasive mechanical ventilation (62.3% versus 3.8%). Antivirals, antibiotics, traditional Chinese medicines and glucocorticoid treatment may significantly increase the survival time of fatal cases. Quantitative computed tomography imaging results were correlated with biochemical markers. Conclusions: Most patients with fatal outcomes were more likely to have common comorbidities. The leading causes of death were respiratory failure and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Acute respiratory distress syndrome, respiratory failure and septic shock were the most common serious complications. Antivirals, antibiotics, traditional Chinese medicines, and glucocorticoid treatment may prolong the survival time of deceased patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Radiography, Thoracic , Retrospective Studies , Survival Analysis
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(13)2021 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302305

ABSTRACT

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the mediating effects of individual affect and relationship satisfaction on the relationship between self-esteem and Problematic Internet Use (PIU). Affect was measured using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), relationship satisfaction was assessed using a positive and negative semantic dimension scale, self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and PIU was measured using the Problematic Internet Use scale with a sample of 507 Chinese university students (Mage = 20.41 years, SD = 2.49). The relationships between the variables were tested using structural equation modelling with a multiple mediation model. The results revealed that negative affect and the negative semantic dimensions of relationship satisfaction mediated the relationship between self-esteem and PIU. The implications of the results and the study's theoretical contributions are discussed.


Subject(s)
Behavior, Addictive , Personal Satisfaction , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , Internet Use , Students
8.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(12): 2203-2205, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269541

ABSTRACT

Seventy-six days after the coronavirus disease 2019 epidemic was contained in Wuhan, the Chinese government carried out a citywide severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 nucleic acid testing initiative for all residents from 14 May to 1 June 2020. Our hospital tested 107 662 residents around Huanan seafood market, uncovering a positivity rate of 0.006%.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , China/epidemiology , Humans , Seafood
9.
Alzheimers Res Ther ; 13(1): 111, 2021 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266503

ABSTRACT

Challenges have been recognized in healthcare of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the COVID-19 pandemic, given a high infection and mortality rate of COVID-19 in these patients. This situation urges the identification of underlying risks and preferably biomarkers for evidence-based, more effective healthcare. Towards this goal, current literature review and network analysis synthesize available information on the AD-related gene APOE into four lines of mechanistic evidence. At a cellular level, the risk isoform APOE4 confers high infectivity by the underlying coronavirus SARS-CoV-2; at a genetic level, APOE4 is associated with severe COVID-19; at a pathway level, networking connects APOE with COVID-19 risk factors such as ACE2, TMPRSS2, NRP1, and LZTFL1; at a behavioral level, APOE4-associated dementia may increase the exposure to coronavirus infection which causes COVID-19. Thus, APOE4 could exert multiple actions for high infection and mortality rates of the patients, or generally, with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , COVID-19 , Alzheimer Disease/genetics , Apolipoprotein E4/genetics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
EClinicalMedicine ; 29: 100628, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252757
11.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e932361, 2021 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND COVID-19 and influenza share many similarities, such as mode of transmission and clinical symptoms. Failure to distinguish the 2 diseases may increase the risk of transmission. A fast and convenient differential diagnosis between COVID-19 and influenza has significant clinical value, especially for low- and middle-income countries with a shortage of nucleic acid detection kits. We aimed to establish a diagnostic model to differentiate COVID-19 and influenza based on clinical data. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 493 patients were enrolled in the study, including 282 with COVID-19 and 211 with influenza. All data were collected and reviewed retrospectively. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of all patients were analyzed and compared. We then randomly divided all patients into development sets and validation sets to establish a diagnostic model using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Finally, we validated the diagnostic model using the validation set. RESULTS We preliminarily established a diagnostic model for differentiating COVID-19 from influenza that consisted of 5 variables: age, dry cough, fever, white cell count, and D-dimer. The model showed good performance for differential diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS This initial model including clinical features and laboratory indices effectively differentiated COVID-19 from influenza. Patients with a high score were at a high risk of having COVID-19, while patients with a low score were at a high risk of having influenza. This model could help clinicians quickly identify and isolate cases in the absence of nucleic acid tests, especially during the cocirculation of COVID-19 and influenza. Owing to the study's retrospective nature, further prospective study is needed to validate the accuracy of the model.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Adult , Cough/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Fever/diagnosis , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
12.
Curr Neuropharmacol ; 19(1): 92-96, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154160

ABSTRACT

The pandemic novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has become a global concern in which the respiratory system is not the only one involved. Previous researches have presented the common clinical manifestations including respiratory symptoms (i.e., fever and cough), fatigue and myalgia. However, there is limited evidence for neurological and psychological influences of SARS-CoV-2. In this review, we discuss the common neurological manifestations of COVID-19 including acute cerebrovascular disease (i.e., cerebral hemorrhage) and muscle ache. Possible viral transmission to the nervous system may occur via circulation, an upper nasal transcribrial route and/or conjunctival route. Moreover, we cannot ignore the psychological influence on the public, medical staff and confirmed patients. Dealing with public psychological barriers and performing psychological crisis intervention are an important part of public health interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/physiopathology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Myalgia/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Blood-Brain Barrier , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/psychology , Central Nervous System Viral Diseases/transmission , Cerebral Hemorrhage/physiopathology , Conjunctiva , Dizziness/physiopathology , Ethmoid Bone , Headache/physiopathology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
13.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(12): e0008950, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992645

ABSTRACT

Medical staff treating Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients are at high risk for exposure to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and many have been infected, which may cause panic among medical workers, their relatives, health professionals, and government leaders. We report the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of healthcare workers and that the majority of infected medical staff had milder symptoms/conditions with a better prognosis than admitted patients. Timely improvement to medical staff's working conditions such as allowing adequate rest and providing sufficient medical protection is extremely important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Prognosis , Risk Factors
14.
Diagn Interv Imaging ; 102(2): 69-75, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967744

ABSTRACT

With the rapid spread of COVID-19 worldwide, early detection and efficient isolation of suspected patients are especially important to prevent the transmission. Although nucleic acid testing of SARS-CoV-2 is still the gold standard for diagnosis, there are well-recognized early-detection problems including time-consuming in the diagnosis process, noticeable false-negative rate in the early stage and lacking nucleic acid testing kits in some areas. Therefore, effective and rational applications of imaging technologies are critical in aiding the screen and helping the diagnosis of suspected patients. Currently, chest computed tomography is recommended as the first-line imaging test for detecting COVID-19 pneumonia, which could allow not only early detection of the typical chest manifestations, but also timely estimation of the disease severity and therapeutic effects. In addition, other radiological methods including chest X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission computed tomography also show significant advantages in the detection of COVID-19 pneumonia. This review summarizes the applications of radiology and nuclear medicine in detecting and diagnosing COVID-19. It highlights the importance for these technologies to curb the rapid transmission during the pandemic, considering findings from special groups such as children and pregnant women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Patient Identification Systems , Artificial Intelligence , Child , Early Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Mass Screening , Positron-Emission Tomography , Pregnancy , Risk Factors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
15.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-566

ABSTRACT

Background: The 2019 novel coronavirus-infected disease (COVID-19) breakout in Wuhan of China has caused growing concerns about the consequences. Here we report

16.
Curr Gene Ther ; 20(4): 285-288, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-738402

ABSTRACT

Patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 carry the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) which involves multiple systems and organs with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as the most common complication, largely due to cytokine storms or dysregulated immunity. As such, there are many severe patients with complications such as cytokine storm syndrome (CSS), who have a high fatality rate. Neither specific anti-SARS-CoV-2 drugs nor vaccines exist currently. Current treatment relies mainly on self-recovery through patients' immune function. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a kind of multipotent tissue stem cells, which have powerful anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory functions, inhibiting the cytokine storms. In addition, MSCs have a strong ability to repair tissue damage and reduce the risk of severe complications such as acute lung injury and ARDS, and hopefully, reduce the fatality rate in these patients. There are several clinical types of research completed for treating COVID-19 with MSCs, all reporting restoration of T cells and clinical safety. Here we discuss the clinical prospect and conclude the therapeutic effects and potential mechanism for MSCs in treating COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation/methods , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/cytology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Feasibility Studies , Humans
17.
Ther Adv Chronic Dis ; 11: 2040622320949423, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721275

ABSTRACT

Elderly populations with underlying chronic diseases are more vulnerable to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and have higher mortality. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease that occurs more often in elderly people. Currently, little is known about whether patients with PD are more susceptible to novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and whether the treatment of PD would affect the management of COVID-19 or vice versa. Here, we report a case of a PD patient with severe COVID-19 pneumonia in Wuhan, China. After diagnosis of COVID-19, this PD patient had worsening of motor symptoms, complicated with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, urinary tract infection, and acute encephalopathy. In addition to treatment for COVID-19 and urinary tract infection, we adjusted anti-PD medicine by stepwise increasing of dose, resulting in better control of her mobility symptoms and non-motor symptoms.

18.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 77(1): 67-73, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-721452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Facing the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), most vulnerable individuals are seniors, especially those with comorbidities. More attention needs to been paid to the COVID-19 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is the top age-related neurodegenerative disease. OBJECTIVE: Since it is unclear whether AD patients are prone to COVID-19 infection and progression to severe stages, we report for the first time a retrospective analysis of the clinical characteristics of AD patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of the clinical data of 19 AD patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, compared with 23 non-AD COVID-19 patients admitted at the same time to our hospital. Demographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, and treatment data were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: Between AD patients and non-AD patients with COVID-19 pneumonia, the pneumonia severity was not significantly different. AD patients had a higher clustering onset than non-AD patients. The median duration from symptom onset to hospitalization were shorter in AD patients than non-AD patients, indicating the former were sent to the hospital by their family or from nursing home earlier than the later. The median duration from hospitalization to discharge seemed shorter in AD patients than non-AD patients. Dementia patients seemed less likely to report fatigue. It is noticed that more AD patients might have pericardial effusion than the non-AD patients. CONCLUSION: AD patients with COVID-19 were in milder conditions with a better prognosis than non-AD patients. AD patients who had adequate access to healthcare showed resilience to COVID-19 with shorter hospital stays.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/complications , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cluster Analysis , Cohort Studies , Disease Progression , Fatigue/etiology , Fatigue/psychology , Female , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Pleural Effusion/epidemiology , Pleural Effusion/etiology , Pneumonia/complications , Pneumonia/therapy , Prognosis
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