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1.
Blood Purif ; : 1-9, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832797

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The efficacy of renal-replacement treatment (RRT) remains to be validated in COVID-19. In this retrospective cohort study, we aimed to assess the efficacy of early initiation of RRT in intensive care unit (ICU) adults with severe COVID-19. METHODS: Fifty-eight adult patients in ICU with critically ill or severe COVID-19 with a tendency of critical illness were recruited from February 9, 2020, to March 30, 2020. Early RRT were determined by the ICU medical team based on boom in cytokines levels, increased organs injury/failure, and rapid aggravation of condition. All participants were followed up from the first day of ICU admission to March 30, 2020. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality in ICU. RESULTS: The mean age of the cohort was 68.4 ± 14.6 years, with 81.0% having at least one comorbidity before hospitalization. Twenty patients (34.5%) initiated early RRT after 24.1 ± 10.4 days from the onset and 6.4 ± 3.6 days from ICU admission. Thirty-four of 58 participants (58.6%) died during ICU follow-up. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazards model showed that early RRT was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality in ICU with an adjusted HR of 0.280 (95% CI: 0.106-0.738, p = 0.010). Sudden unexpected death (SUD) was remarkably reduced in the early RRT group, compared with the control group (0.2 vs. 2.9 per 100 person-day, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: Early RRT can reduce the all-cause in-hospital mortality, especially SUD in patients with severe COVID-19, but not improve multi-organ impairment or increase the risk of AKI. Early initiation of RRT merits an optional strategy in critically ill patients with COVID-19 (ChiCTR2000030773).

2.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 659793, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497084

ABSTRACT

Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) might benefit critically ill COVID-19 patients. But the considerations besides indications guiding ECMO initiation under extreme pressure during the COVID-19 epidemic was not clear. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and in-hospital mortality of severe critically ill COVID-19 patients supported with ECMO and without ECMO, exploring potential parameters for guiding the initiation during the COVID-19 epidemic. Methods: Observational cohort study of all the critically ill patients indicated for ECMO support from January 1 to May 1, 2020, in all 62 authorized hospitals in Wuhan, China. Results: Among the 168 patients enrolled, 74 patients actually received ECMO support and 94 not were analyzed. The in-hospital mortality of the ECMO supported patients was significantly lower than non-ECMO ones (71.6 vs. 85.1%, P = 0.033), but the role of ECMO was affected by patients' age (Logistic regression OR 0.62, P = 0.24). As for the ECMO patients, the median age was 58 (47-66) years old and 62.2% (46/74) were male. The 28-day, 60-day, and 90-day mortality of these ECMO supported patients were 32.4, 68.9, and 74.3% respectively. Patients survived to discharge were younger (49 vs. 62 years, P = 0.042), demonstrated higher lymphocyte count (886 vs. 638 cells/uL, P = 0.022), and better CO2 removal (PaCO2 immediately after ECMO initiation 39.7 vs. 46.9 mmHg, P = 0.041). Age was an independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality of the ECMO supported patients, and a cutoff age of 51 years enabled prediction of in-hospital mortality with a sensitivity of 84.3% and specificity of 55%. The surviving ECMO supported patients had longer ICU and hospital stays (26 vs. 18 days, P = 0.018; 49 vs. 29 days, P = 0.001 respectively), and ECMO procedure was widely carried out after the supplement of medical resources after February 15 (67.6%, 50/74). Conclusions: ECMO might be a benefit for severe critically ill COVID-19 patients at the early stage of epidemic, although the in-hospital mortality was still high. To initiate ECMO therapy under tremendous pressure, patients' age, lymphocyte count, and adequacy of medical resources should be fully considered.

4.
Signa Vitae ; 17(2):216-218, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1140864

ABSTRACT

The ICU delirium is a predictor of mortality, length of stay in hospital, time on ventilation, and long-term cognitive impairment. There is a well-established association between acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and ICU delirium. However, the profile and disease progression trajectory of COVID-19 patients with ICU delirium has not been studied. This case series reviews our institution's experience in COVID-19 patients with ICU delirium. Of all four patients, two of them died in hospital, and the other two survived to the hospital discharge. The disease progressions were tracked, as well as the ICU delirium. Potential life-threatening complications and organ failure symptoms were also presented. To improve the patients' overall health outcome, Haloperidol was prescribed with careful consideration.

5.
SciFinder; 2020.
Preprint | SciFinder | ID: ppcovidwho-5428

ABSTRACT

A review. Patients infected with 2019-nCoV show elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines and disorders of clot-related indicators. Whether there is a higher risk of thromboembolism has not been confirmed in those patients. However, based on previous research on SARS-CoV, we infer that coronavirus may promotes the formation of blood clots by increasing the expression of inflammatory cytokines in infected epithelials. These cytokines can enhance coagulation cascade, disturbethe physiol. balance of the blood coagulation and anticoagulation, and then progress the body into high coagulation state. The review of the relationship between coronavirus and coagulation state plays an important role for those infected patients' clin. management.

7.
Clinical eHealth ; 3:7-15, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-822402

ABSTRACT

The aim is to diagnose COVID-19 earlier and to improve its treatment by applying medical technology, the “COVID-19 Intelligent Diagnosis and Treatment Assistant Program (nCapp)” based on the Internet of Things. Terminal eight functions can be implemented in real-time online communication with the “cloud” through the page selection key. According to existing data, questionnaires, and check results, the diagnosis is automatically generated as confirmed, suspected, or suspicious of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) infection. It classifies patients into mild, moderate, severe or critical pneumonia. nCapp can also establish an online COVID-19 real-time update database, and it updates the model of diagnosis in real time based on the latest real-world case data to improve diagnostic accuracy. Additionally, nCapp can guide treatment. Front-line physicians, experts, and managers are linked to perform consultation and prevention. nCapp also contributes to the long-term follow-up of patients with COVID-19. The ultimate goal is to enable different levels of COVID-19 diagnosis and treatment among different doctors from different hospitals to upgrade to the national and international through the intelligent assistance of the nCapp system. In this way, we can block disease transmission, avoid physician infection, and epidemic prevention and control as soon as possible.

8.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-864

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been pandemic and is leading to many deaths due to refractory respiratory failure. Here, we report our experience of tre

9.
Eur Heart J Case Rep ; 4(FI1): 1-3, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-756894
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