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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313462

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the relationship between the self-reported health status, emotional coping style, emotional intelligence and positive psychological state of college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The questionnaires of Self-rated Health Measurement Scale (SRHMS), Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS), Psychological Capital Questionnaire (PCQ), Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ)were used for online survey. The study included 367 undergraduates. Results: Male undergraduates had significantly higher psychological capital scores than female ( P  < 0.05), and those without siblings had significantly higher emotional intelligence and psychological capital scores than those with ( P  < 0.05). The students from urban had significantly higher emotional intelligence scores than those from rural ( P  < 0.05). Students who spent less than 3 hours online per day had significantly higher self-rated health scores than those spending 6 hours online per day ( P  < 0.05), and those who spent 3–6 hours online per day was significantly higher psychological capital scores than those who spent more than 6 hours online per day ( P  < 0.05). The interaction between emotional intelligence, psychological capital and coping styles was statistically significant ( β =-0.045, P  < 0.05) in health status with coping style ranking the top ( β  = 21.277). Conclusion: Sex, having siblings or not, birth place and online time per day affected health status, emotional intelligence, and psychological capital in undergraduate students. Coping style is a main positive factor that affects health, which was modified by emotional intelligence and psychological capital. In this pandemic emergency, positive coping style with optimistic emotional perception and understanding is an important measure against the pandemic-induced health problem.

2.
Comput Biol Chem ; 96: 107613, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549716

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an ongoing global health emergency that has caused tremendous stress and loss of life worldwide. The viral spike glycoprotein is a critical molecule mediating transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by interacting with human ACE2. However, through the course of the pandemics, there has not been a thorough analysis of the spike protein mutations, and on how these mutants influence the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Besides, cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection among pets and wild animals have been reported, so the susceptibility of these animals requires great attention to investigate, as they may also link to the renewed question of a possible intermediate host for SARS-CoV-2 before it was transmitted to humans. With over 226,000 SARS-CoV-2 sequences obtained, we found 1573 missense mutations in the spike gene, and 226 of them were within the receptor-binding domain (RBD) region that directly interacts with human ACE2. Modeling the interactions between SARS-CoV-2 spike mutants and ACE2 molecules showed that most of the 74 missense mutations in the RBD region of the interaction interface had little impact on spike binding to ACE2, whereas several within the spike RBD increased the binding affinity toward human ACE2 thus making the virus likely more contagious. On the other hand, modeling the interactions between animal ACE2 molecules and SARS-CoV-2 spike revealed that many pets and wild animals' ACE2 had a variable binding ability. Particularly, ACE2 of bamboo rat had stronger binding to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, whereas that of mole, vole, Mus pahari, palm civet, and pangolin had a weaker binding compared to human ACE2. Our results provide structural insights into the impact on interactions of the SARS-CoV-2 spike mutants to human ACE2, and shed light on SARS-CoV-2 transmission in pets and wild animals, and possible clues to the intermediate host(s) for SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , COVID-19/veterinary , COVID-19/virology , Mutation, Missense , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Animals, Wild/genetics , Animals, Wild/virology , COVID-19/transmission , Computational Biology , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , Host Specificity/genetics , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Pandemics/veterinary , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pets/genetics , Pets/virology , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs/genetics , Risk Factors
4.
Comput Struct Biotechnol J ; 19: 1863-1873, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171610

ABSTRACT

Metabolic profiling in COVID-19 patients has been associated with disease severity, but there is no report on sex-specific metabolic changes in discharged survivors. Herein we used an integrated approach of LC-MS-and GC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics to analyze plasma metabolic characteristics in men and women with non-severe COVID-19 at both acute period and 30 days after discharge. The results demonstrate that metabolic alterations in plasma of COVID-19 patients during the recovery and rehabilitation process were presented in a sex specific manner. Overall, the levels of most metabolites were increased in COVID-19 patients after the cure relative to acute period. The major plasma metabolic changes were identified including fatty acids in men and glycerophosphocholines and carbohydrates in women. In addition, we found that women had shorter length of hospitalization than men and metabolic characteristics may contribute to predict the duration from positive to negative in non-severe COVID-19 patients. Collectively, this study shed light on sex-specific metabolic shifts in non-severe COVID-19 patients during the recovery process, suggesting a sex bias in prognostic and therapeutic evaluations based on metabolic profiling.

6.
Int J Infect Dis ; 105: 389-390, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108324
7.
Int J Infect Dis ; 103: 507-513, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-974112

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of thalidomide, an immunomodulatory agent, in combination with glucocorticoid, for the treatment of COVID-19 patients with life-threatening symptoms. METHODS: A nonrandomized comparative case series study was performed. Six patients received thalidomide 100 mg per day (with therapy lasting for ≥7 days) plus low-dose short-term dexamethasone, and 6 control patients matched with patients in the thalidomide group, received low-dose short-term treatment with dexamethasone alone. The main outcomes were: the duration of SARS-CoV-2 negative conversion from admission; length of hospital stay; and changes in inflammatory cytokine concentrations and lymphocyte subsets. RESULTS: The median thalidomide treatment time was 12.0 days. The median duration of SARS-CoV-2 negative conversion from admission and hospital stay length were briefer in the thalidomide group compared to the control group (respectively, 11.0 vs 23.0 days, P = 0.043; 18.5 vs 30.0 days, P = 0.043). The mean reduction rates at 7-10 days after treatment for serum interleukin-6 and interferon-γ concentrations were greater in the thalidomide group compared to the control group. Alterations in lymphocyte numbers in the subsets between the 2 groups were similar. CONCLUSIONS: Thalidomide plus short-term glucocorticoid therapy is an effective and safe regimen for the treatment of severely ill COVID-19 patients. The mechanism of action is most likely inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Thalidomide/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
8.
Aging (Albany NY) ; 12(23): 23450-23463, 2020 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940432

ABSTRACT

It is essential to know whether COVID-19 patients have a history of cerebrovascular disease, as it may be predictive of prognosis and useful for allocation of limited medical resources. This meta-analysis was performed to assess the incidence of cerebrovascular disease as a comorbidity in COVID-19 patients. The PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, CNKI, WFSD, and VIP databases were systematically searched. The pooled analysis of relevant data was conducted using RevMan 5.3 software. The primary outcome was incidence of cerebrovascular disease as a comorbidity. Forty-seven studies involving 16,143 COVID-19 patients were included in this analysis. The incidences of a history of cerebrovascular disease and hypertension in COVID-19 patients were estimated to be 3.0% (95% CI, 2.0%-4.0%; P<0.00001) and 23.0% (95% CI, 16.0%-29.0%; P<0.00001), respectively. The incidence of dizziness/headache as the first symptom in COVID-19 patients was estimated to be 14.0% (95% CI, 8.0%-20.0%; P<0.00001). Subgroup analyses indicated that country, sex ratio, and sample size are potential influencing factors affecting the incidences of cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, and dizziness/headache. These findings suggest that cerebrovascular disease is an underlying comorbidity among patients with COVID-19. In addition, patients experiencing dizziness/headache as the first symptom of COVID-19 should receive a neurological examination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/complications , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Incidence , Mortality , Patient Outcome Assessment , Prognosis , Publication Bias , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
9.
Cell J ; 22(Suppl 1): 155-165, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-708715

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus has been spreading since December 2019. It was initially reported in Wuhan, Hubei province of China. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has currently become a pandemic affecting over seven million people worldwide, and the number is still rising. Wenzhou, as the first hit city out of Hubei Province, achieved a remarkable success in effectively containing the disease. A great record was also observed in Wenzhou for the clinical management of COVID-19 patients, leading to one of the lowest death rates in China. Researchers and clinical specialists proposed and formulated combined approaches such as computerized tomography (CT)- scans and molecular assays, as well as using both allopathic and traditional medications to mitigate its effects. Iranian and Chinese specialists and scientists had a communication in clinical, molecular and pharmaceutical aspects of COVID-19. A proper guideline was prepared according to the experiences of Chinese clinicians in managing the full spectrum of COVID-19 patients, from relatively mild to highly complex cases. The purpose of this guideline is to serve a reference in the hospital for specialists so that they may better diagnose cases and provide effective therapies and proposed antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs for patients.

11.
Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi ; 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-344795

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To study the clinical features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children aged <18 years. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed from the medical data of 23 children, aged from 3 months to 17 years and 8 months, who were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Jiangxi, China from January 21 to February 29, 2020. RESULTS: Of the 23 children with COVID-19, 17 had family aggregation. Three children (13%) had asymptomatic infection, 6 (26%) had mild type, and 14 (61%) had common type. Among these 23 children, 16 (70%) had fever, 11 (48%) had cough, 8 (35%) had fever and cough, and 8 (35%) had wet rales in the lungs. The period from disease onset or the first nucleic acid-positive detection of SARS-CoV-2 to the virus nucleic acid negative conversion was 6-24 days (median 12 days). Of the 23 children, 3 had a reduction in total leukocyte count, 2 had a reduction in lymphocytes, 2 had an increase in C-reactive protein, and 2 had an increase in D-dimer. Abnormal pulmonary CT findings were observed in 12 children, among whom 9 had patchy ground-glass opacities in both lungs. All 23 children received antiviral therapy and were recovered. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 in children aged <18 years often occurs with family aggregation, with no specific clinical manifestation and laboratory examination results. Most of these children have mild symptoms and a good prognosis. Epidemiological history is of particular importance in the diagnosis of COVID-19 in children aged <18 years.

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