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1.
Sustainability ; 14(15):9240, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1994172

ABSTRACT

With the gradual popularization of mobile learning, it has become a trend for college students to use learning applications (APPs) for learning, but the learning effect has always been a concern. Since college students have different learning purposes, strategies, skills, and habits, responses to these differences have been an urgent problem. This paper takes college students using an English vocabulary APP to study as the survey object. It sets up the influencing factors model of the English vocabulary learning effect based on UTAUT2. Then, we analyzed the factors influencing the learning effect of using an English vocabulary APP and studied its mechanism. The results show that on the one hand, the influence degree of influencing factors is habit, facilitation condition, price value, effort expectancy, and performance expectancy from high to low, and all the above factors have a significant positive impact on the learning effect of college students using English vocabulary APP. On the other hand, gender, grade, and major have a moderating effect on English vocabulary learning, and there are differences among different genders, grades, and majors. Finally, suggestions are put forward from the perspective of APP construction and students’ differences to enhance and improve the learning effect of English vocabulary.

2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 900776, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1987597

ABSTRACT

Background: A significant public health emergency has appeared worldwide since the beginning of 2020. The spread of negative information about COVID-19 on social media poses a challenge and threat to public health disposition and the credibility of government public opinion. Objective: This study aimed to analyze the rules and characteristics of government media in disseminating information on public emergencies. In addition, find ways and means to improve government media's communication power and credibility. Method: Based on relevant theories and measures of information econometrics, 10 WeChat official accounts of the Chinese government were taken as examples. The Python crawler tool was used to collect data of 10 WeChat official accounts-related tweets. In addition, this study used various tools, such as ROST, UCINET, and SPSS, for statistical analysis and co-word analysis of the data. Result: From January 17 to March 31, 2020, 6,612 COVID-19-related tweets were published by 10 WeChat official accounts, which broadcast epidemic overview, epidemic prevention and control, science and disinformation, epidemic assistance, epidemic impact, and negative impact. By analyzing the posting time and content of the tweets, we found that changes in the number of articles posted by the WeChat and changes in content and the progress of the COVID-19 pandemic are nearly synchronized, and most tweets are published at 8:00 am. Furthermore, based on the analytics of high dissemination index and high-frequency words, we propose that there is a significant correlation between the strength of independence and the credibility of the WeChat official account. Conclusion: The three elements of WeChat communication (value, interest, and moving) and the degree of independent innovation of public numbers impact the communication power and credibility of government media. First, if the articles published by the WeChat official account are valuable, interesting, and moving, the communication power of the WeChat official account would get more powerful. Second, increased ability for independent innovation has a positive impact on enhancing the WeChat official account's credibility. Third, government media can improve its governance effects of public health emergencies by enhancing their communication power and credibility.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Communication , Emergencies , Government , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health
3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324276

ABSTRACT

Background: A cluster of acute respiratory illness, now known as Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic. Aged population with cardiovascular diseases are more likely be to infected with SARS-CoV-2 and result in more severe outcomes and elevated case-fatality rate. Meanwhile, cardiovascular diseases have a high prevalence in the middle-aged and elderly population. However, despite of several researches in COVID-19, cardiovascular implications related to it still remains largely unclear. Therefore, a specific analysis in regard to cardiovascular implications of COVID-19 patients is in great need.Methods In this single-centered, retrospective, observational study, 116 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled, who admitted to the General Hospital of Central Theater Command (Wuhan, China) from January 20 to March 8, 2020. The demographic data, underlying comorbidities, clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory findings, chest computed tomography, treatment measures, and outcome data were collected from electronic medical records. Data were compared between non-severe and severe cases.ResultsOf 116 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, the median age was 58.5 years (IQR, 47.0-69.0), and 36 (31.0%) were female. Hypertension (45 [38.8%]), diabetes (19 [16.4%]), and coronary heart disease (17 [14.7%]) were the most common coexisting conditions. Common symptoms included fever [99 (85.3%)], dry cough (61 [52.6%]), fatigue (60 [51.7%]), dyspnea (52 [44.8%]), anorexia (50 [43.1%]), and chest discomfort (50 [43.1%]). Local and/or bilateral patchy shadowing were the typical radiological findings on chest computed tomography. Lymphopenia (lymphocyte count, 1.0 × 10 9 /L [IQR, 0.7-1.3]) was observed in 66 patients (56.9%), and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (245.5 U/L [IQR, 194.3-319.8]) in 69 patients (59.5%). Hypokalemia occurred in 24 (20.7%) patients. Compared with non-severe cases, severe cases were older (64.0 years [IQR, 53.0-76.0] vs 56.0 years [IQR, 37.0-64.0]), more likely to have comorbidities (35 [63.6%] vs 24 [39.3%]), and more likely to develop acute cardiac injury (19 [34.5%] vs 4 [6.6%]), acute heart failure (18 [32.7%] vs 3 [4.9%]), and ARDS (20 [36.4%] vs 0 [0%]). During hospitalization, the prevalence of new onset hypertension was significantly higher in severe patients (55.2% vs 19.0%) than in non-severe ones.Conclusions In this single-centered, retrospective, observational study, we found that the infection of SARS-CoV-2 was more likely to occur in middle and aged population with cardiovascular comorbidities. Cardiovascular complications, including new onset hypertension and heart injury were common in severe patients with COVID-19. More detailed researches in cardiovascular involvement in COVID-19 are urgently needed to further understand the disease.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(22)2021 11 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534069

ABSTRACT

Since its emergence in 2019, COVID-19 has quickly triggered widespread public discussion on social media. From 26 February 2020 to 26 September 2020, this study collected data on COVID-19-related posts in the knowledge Q&A community, identified 220 opinion leaders of this community, and used social network analysis and sentiment analysis to analyze the information exchange behavior and emotional evolution of the opinion leaders during COVID-19. The results show that the COVID-19 topic community could be divided into seven main categories. The information dissemination of opinion leader information dissemination network had low efficiency, multiple paths, and a high degree of control. In addition, the emotional evolution of users showed obvious phased characteristics. User emotion changed from initially strong negative to strong positive over the course of the pandemic and eventually tended to be objective and neutral as time passed and the event stabilized.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Emotions , Humans , Information Dissemination , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Environ Sci Technol ; 55(7): 4103-4114, 2021 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392753

ABSTRACT

Intensified efforts to curb transmission of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 might lead to an elevated concentration of disinfectants in domestic wastewater and drinking water in China, possibly resulting in the generation of numerous toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In this study, the occurrence and distribution of five categories of DBPs, including six trihalomethanes (THMs), nine haloacetic acids (HAAs), two haloketones, nine nitrosamines, and nine aromatic halogenated DBPs, in domestic wastewater effluent, tap water, and surface water were investigated. The results showed that the total concentration level of measured DBPs in wastewater effluents (78.3 µg/L) was higher than that in tap water (56.0 µg/L, p = 0.05), followed by surface water (8.0 µg/L, p < 0.01). Moreover, HAAs and THMs were the two most dominant categories of DBPs in wastewater effluents, tap water, and surface water, accounting for >90%, respectively. Out of the regulated DBPs, none of the wastewater effluents and tap water samples exceeded the corresponding maximum guideline values of chloroform (300 µg/L), THM4 (80 µg/L), NDMA (100 ng/L), and only 2 of 35 tap water samples (67.6 and 63.3 µg/L) exceeded the HAA5 (60 µg/L) safe limit. HAAs in wastewater effluents showed higher values of risk quotient for green algae. This study illustrates that the elevated use of disinfectants within the guidance ranges during water disinfection did not result in a significant increase in the concentration of DBPs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disinfectants , Drinking Water , Water Pollutants, Chemical , Water Purification , China , Disinfectants/analysis , Disinfection , Drinking Water/analysis , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Trihalomethanes/analysis , Waste Water , Water , Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
6.
JMIR Mhealth Uhealth ; 8(12): e20642, 2020 12 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has become a global public health event, which has raised concerns regarding individuals' health. Individuals need to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic with guidelines on symptom recognition, home isolation, and maintain mental health. Besides routine use of mobile health (mHealth) such as accessing information to keep healthy, individuals can use mHealth services in situations requiring urgent medical care, which is defined as mHealth emergency use. It is not known whether individuals have increased their daily mHealth services emergency use as a result of disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this diary analysis study is to assess the influences of daily disruptions related to the COVID-19 pandemic on individuals' mHealth emergency use. The secondary purpose of this study is to explore the mediating role of COVID-19-induced strain and the moderating role of promotion regulatory focus in the relationship between daily disruptions of COVID-19 and mHealth emergency use. Drawing from the cognitive activation theory of stress, we investigated the underlying mechanism and boundary condition of the influence of COVID-19-related disruptions on daily mHealth emergency use. METHODS: To test the proposed model, this study adopts the experience sampling method to collect daily data. The experience sampling method helps researchers to capture participants' fluctuations in emotions, mental engagement in an activity, and experienced stress. This study collected 550 cases nested in 110 samples in mainland China to test the conceptual model. In addition, we employed hierarchical linear modeling analysis to test the effect of COVID-19-related disruptions on mHealth emergency use. RESULTS: We found that COVID-19-related disruptions increased COVID-19-induced strain (γ=0.24, P<.001) and mHealth emergency use on a daily basis (γ=0.28, P<.001). COVID-19-induced daily strain mediated this relationship (effect=0.09, 95% CI 0.05-0.14). Promotion regulatory focus moderated the relationship between COVID-19-induced strain and mHealth emergency use (γ=0.35, P=.02). In addition, the indirect relationship between disruptions and mHealth emergency use intentions through COVID-19-induced strain is contingent upon promotion regulatory focus: this relationship was stronger in those with high promotion regulatory focus (effect=0.12, 95% CI 0.06-0.19) than in those with low promotion regulatory focus (effect=0.06, 95% CI 0.02-0.11). CONCLUSIONS: Event disruption of the COVID-19 pandemic induced mHealth emergency use intention through increased psychological strain. Furthermore, individuals' promotion regulatory focus amplified this indirect relationship. Our findings extend our understanding of the factors underlying mHealth emergency use intention and illustrate the potential contingent role of promotion regulatory focus in the cognitive activation theory of stress. This study also opens avenues for future research on mHealth emergency use intention in other countries and cultural settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intention , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment
7.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 787, 2020 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-885974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A cluster of acute respiratory illness, now known as Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by 2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), has become a global pandemic. Aged population with cardiovascular diseases are more likely be to infected with SARS-CoV-2 and result in more severe outcomes and elevated case-fatality rate. Meanwhile, cardiovascular diseases have a high prevalence in the middle-aged and elderly population. However, despite of several researches in COVID-19, cardiovascular implications related to it still remains largely unclear. Therefore, a specific analysis in regard to cardiovascular implications of COVID-19 patients is in great need. METHODS: In this single-centered, retrospective, observational study, 116 patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled, who admitted to the General Hospital of Central Theater Command (Wuhan, China) from January 20 to March 8, 2020. The demographic data, underlying comorbidities, clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory findings, chest computed tomography, treatment measures, and outcome data were collected from electronic medical records. Data were compared between non-severe and severe cases. RESULTS: Of 116 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, the median age was 58.5 years (IQR, 47.0-69.0), and 36 (31.0%) were female. Hypertension (45 [38.8%]), diabetes (19 [16.4%]), and coronary heart disease (17 [14.7%]) were the most common coexisting conditions. Common symptoms included fever [99 (85.3%)], dry cough (61 [52.6%]), fatigue (60 [51.7%]), dyspnea (52 [44.8%]), anorexia (50 [43.1%]), and chest discomfort (50 [43.1%]). Local and/or bilateral patchy shadowing were the typical radiological findings on chest computed tomography. Lymphopenia (lymphocyte count, 1.0 × 109/L [IQR, 0.7-1.3]) was observed in 66 patients (56.9%), and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (245.5 U/L [IQR, 194.3-319.8]) in 69 patients (59.5%). Hypokalemia occurred in 24 (20.7%) patients. Compared with non-severe cases, severe cases were older (64.0 years [IQR, 53.0-76.0] vs 56.0 years [IQR, 37.0-64.0]), more likely to have comorbidities (35 [63.6%] vs 24 [39.3%]), and more likely to develop acute cardiac injury (19 [34.5%] vs 4 [6.6%]), acute heart failure (18 [32.7%] vs 3 [4.9%]), and ARDS (20 [36.4%] vs 0 [0%]). During hospitalization, the prevalence of new onset hypertension was significantly higher in severe patients (55.2% vs 19.0%) than in non-severe ones. CONCLUSIONS: In this single-centered, retrospective, observational study, we found that the infection of SARS-CoV-2 was more likely to occur in middle and aged population with cardiovascular comorbidities. Cardiovascular complications, including new onset hypertension and heart injury were common in severe patients with COVID-19. More detailed researches in cardiovascular involvement in COVID-19 are urgently needed to further understand the disease.


Subject(s)
Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cough/epidemiology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology
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