Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e4154-e4165, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Children and older adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) display a distinct spectrum of disease severity yet the risk factors aren't well understood. We sought to examine the expression pattern of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the cell-entry receptor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the role of lung progenitor cells in children and older patients. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed clinical features in a cohort of 299 patients with COVID-19. The expression and distribution of ACE2 and lung progenitor cells were systematically examined using a combination of public single-cell RNA-seq data sets, lung biopsies, and ex vivo infection of lung tissues with SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus in children and older adults. We also followed up patients who had recovered from COVID-19. RESULTS: Compared with children, older patients (>50 years.) were more likely to develop into serious pneumonia with reduced lymphocytes and aberrant inflammatory response (P = .001). The expression level of ACE2 and lung progenitor cell markers were generally decreased in older patients. Notably, ACE2 positive cells were mainly distributed in the alveolar region, including SFTPC positive cells, but rarely in airway regions in the older adults (P < .01). The follow-up of discharged patients revealed a prolonged recovery from pneumonia in the older (P < .025). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to children, ACE2 positive cells are generally decreased in older adults and mainly presented in the lower pulmonary tract. The lung progenitor cells are also decreased. These risk factors may impact disease severity and recovery from pneumonia caused by SARS-Cov-2 infection in older patients.

2.
Eur Respir J ; 2021 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1320527

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has affected more than 160 million of individuals and caused millions of deaths worldwide at least in part due to the unclarified pathophysiology of this disease. Therefore, identifying the underlying molecular mechanisms of COVID-19 is critical to overcome this pandemic. Metabolites mirror the disease progression of an individual by acquiring extensive insights into the pathophysiological significance during disease progression. We provide a comprehensive view of metabolic characterization of sera from COVID-19 patients at all stages using untargeted and targeted metabolomic analysis. As compared with the healthy controls, we observed different alteration patterns of circulating metabolites from the mild, severe and recovery stages, in both discovery cohort and validation cohort, which suggest that metabolic reprogramming of glucose metabolism and urea cycle are potential pathological mechanisms for COVID-19 progression. Our findings suggest that targeting glucose metabolism and urea cycle may be a viable approach to fight against COVID-19 at various stages along the disease course.

3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 365, 2021 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190058

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) share similar symptoms with influenza A (IA), but it is more worthwhile to understand the disparities of the two infections regarding their clinical characteristics on admission. METHODS: A total of 71 age-matched pediatric IA and COVID-19 patient pairs were formed and their clinical data on admission were compared. RESULTS: Fever, cough, nasal congestion and nausea/vomiting were the most common symptoms on admission for both infections but occurred less often in COVID-19. The IA patients were more likely to have lower-than-normal levels of lymphocyte count and percentage and to have higher-than-normal levels of activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, serum C-reactive protein, and serum procalcitonin, while the COVID-19 patients had higher odds of having lower-than-normal levels of neutrophil count and percentage. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that influenza A is more symptomatic than COVID-19 for children and might be an overall more severe infection at the time of admission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Diagnosis, Differential , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Symptom Assessment , Adolescent , C-Reactive Protein , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , China , Cough , Female , Fever , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Influenza, Human/pathology , Leukocyte Count , Male , Nausea , Neutrophils , Partial Thromboplastin Time , Procalcitonin , Retrospective Studies , Vomiting
4.
Theranostics ; 11(5): 2170-2181, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1016389

ABSTRACT

Introduction: An increasing number of children with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is being reported, yet the spectrum of disease severity and expression patterns of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in children at different developmental stages are largely unknow. Methods: We analysed clinical features in a cohort of 173 children with COVID-19 (0-15 yrs.-old) between January 22, 2020 and March 15, 2020. We systematically examined the expression and distribution of ACE2 in different developmental stages of children by using a combination of children's lung biopsies, pluripotent stem cell-derived lung cells, RNA-sequencing profiles, and ex vivo SARS-CoV-2 pseudoviral infections. Results: It revealed that infants (< 1yrs.-old), with a weaker potency of immune response, are more vulnerable to develop pneumonia whereas older children (> 1 yrs.-old) are more resistant to lung injury. The expression levels of ACE2 however do not vary by age in children's lung. ACE2 is notably expressed not only in Alveolar Type II (AT II) cells, but also in SOX9 positive lung progenitor cells detected in both pluripotent stem cell derivatives and infants' lungs. The ACE2+SOX9+ cells are readily infected by SARS-CoV-2 pseudovirus and the numbers of the double positive cells are significantly decreased in older children. Conclusions: Infants (< 1 yrs.-old) with SARS-CoV-2 infection are more vulnerable to lung injuries. ACE2 expression in multiple types of lung cells including SOX9 positive progenitor cells, in cooperation with an unestablished immune system, could be risk factors contributing to vulnerability of infants with COVID-19. There is a need to continue monitoring lung development in young children who have recovered from SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Lung/cytology , Stem Cells/metabolism , Adolescent , Biopsy , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Immune System , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Lung/virology , Male , RNA-Seq , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , SOX9 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis , Stem Cells/virology
5.
Virol J ; 17(1): 193, 2020 12 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967747

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The new emerging coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) overall shares similar symptoms with other common respiratory viral infections. We aimed in this study to compare COVID-19 and human adenovirus (HAdV) infections in pediatric patients regarding the frequencies of major clinical symptoms and the potential disparities in laboratory and imaging parameters. METHODS: Following a case-control-like design, we built 72 age-matched pediatric COVID-19 and HAdV patient pairs. Their early symptoms and laboratory and imaging characteristics were then retrieved and compared. RESULTS: Fever and cough were the most common symptoms for both infections but were seen more often in HAdV than in COVID-19 patients (92% vs. 66% and 60% vs. 18%, respectively). Compared with COVID-19 patients, children with HAdV infection had statistically significantly higher values of neutrophil count, neutrophil percentage, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin but lower values of lymphocyte percentage, total bilirubin, potassium and sodium. Thoracic computed tomography also revealed more anomalies in HAdV patients than in COVID-19 patients (95% vs. 67%). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is an overall less symptomatic and less severe infection at admission compared to HAdV respiratory infection in pediatric population.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human/pathology , COVID-19/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adenovirus Infections, Human/blood , Adenovirus Infections, Human/diagnostic imaging , Adenoviruses, Human , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
6.
JAMA Intern Med ; 181(4): 566, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-950403
11.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(8): e0008472, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696107

ABSTRACT

In order to rapidly inform polices in the international response to the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19), we summarize in this review current evidence on epidemiological and clinical features of the infection, transmission routes, problems of nucleic-acid testing, the epidemiological trend in China and impact of interventional measures, and some lessons learned. We concluded that the epidemic is containable with traditional nonpharmacological interventions, mainly through social distancing and finding and isolating suspected patients and close contacts. Nonpharmacological interventions are the only effective measures currently accessible and have suppressed some 90% of the infections in China. Close contacts are the major mechanism of transmission, which makes it possible to control this epidemic through nonpharmacological methods. Nucleic-acid testing alone may miss some 50% of infected patients, and other methods such as chest computerized tomography (CT) or serology should be considered to supplement molecular testing. The development of vaccines and drugs is important, but hesitation to make use of nonpharmacological interventions may mean missing golden opportunities for effective actions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/physiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Travel
12.
J Gen Virol ; 101(9): 921-924, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-598900

ABSTRACT

We constructed complex models of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein binding to pangolin or human ACE2, the receptor for virus transmission, and estimated the binding free energy changes using molecular dynamics simulation. SARS-CoV-2 can bind to both pangolin and human ACE2, but has a significantly lower binding affinity for pangolin ACE2 due to the increased binding free energy (9.5 kcal mol-1). Human ACE2 is among the most polymorphous genes, for which we identified 317 missense single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) from the dbSNP database. Three SNVs, E329G (rs143936283), M82I (rs267606406) and K26R (rs4646116), had a significant reduction in binding free energy, which indicated higher binding affinity than wild-type ACE2 and greater susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection for people with them. Three other SNVs, D355N (rs961360700), E37K (rs146676783) and I21T (rs1244687367), had a significant increase in binding free energy, which indicated lower binding affinity and reduced susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Eutheria/metabolism , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Susceptibility , Eutheria/genetics , Genetic Variation , Humans , Mutation , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/chemistry , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Polymorphism, Genetic , Polyproteins , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics
13.
Glob Health Res Policy ; 5: 20, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-186430

ABSTRACT

Background: To contain the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in China, many unprecedented intervention measures are adopted by the government. However, these measures may interfere in the normal medical service. We sought to model the trend of COVID-19 and estimate the restoration of operational capability of metropolitan medical service in China. Methods: Real-time data of COVID-19 and population mobility data were extracted from open sources. SEIR (Susceptible, Exposed, Infectious, Recovered) and neural network models (NNs) were built to model disease trends in Wuhan, Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou. Combined with public transportation data, Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model was used to estimate the accumulated demands for nonlocal hospitalization during the epidemic period in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou. Results: The number of infected people and deaths would increase by 45% and 567% respectively, given that the government only has implemented traffic control in Wuhan without additional medical professionals. The epidemic of Wuhan (measured by cumulative confirmed cases) was predicted to reach turning point at the end of March and end in later April, 2020. The outbreak in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou was predicted to end at the end of March and the medical service could be fully back to normal in middle of April. During the epidemic, the number of nonlocal inpatient hospitalizations decreased by 69.86%, 57.41% and 66.85% in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou respectively. After the end of epidemic, medical centers located in these metropolises may face 58,799 (95% CI 48926-67,232) additional hospitalization needs in the first month. Conclusion: The COVID-19 epidemic in China has been effectively contained and medical service across the country is expected to return to normal in April. However, the huge unmet medical needs for other diseases could result in massive migration of patients and their families, bringing tremendous challenges for medical service in major metropolis and disease control for the potential asymptomatic virus carrier.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Machine Learning , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Epidemics , Forecasting , Humans , Models, Theoretical
14.
Nat Med ; 26(4): 502-505, 2020 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-10221

ABSTRACT

We report epidemiological and clinical investigations on ten pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infection cases confirmed by real-time reverse transcription PCR assay of SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Symptoms in these cases were nonspecific and no children required respiratory support or intensive care. Chest X-rays lacked definite signs of pneumonia, a defining feature of the infection in adult cases. Notably, eight children persistently tested positive on rectal swabs even after nasopharyngeal testing was negative, raising the possibility of fecal-oral transmission.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Feces/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Virus Shedding , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Nasopharynx/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Radiography, Thoracic , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Rectum/virology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...