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1.
Kidney Int Rep ; 6(9): 2525, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796885

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2020.07.010.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2021.07.022.].

2.
Kidney Int Rep ; 6(9): 2526-2531, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796884

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2021.07.021.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2020.07.010.].

3.
Museum International ; 73(3-4):32-43, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1774173

ABSTRACT

During the Covid-19 lockdown from the end of January to March 2020, museums in China were forced to temporarily close, consequently devoting more attention to online activities. Apart from official websites, many museums increased their online activities on China-based video livestreaming platforms such as Kuaishou, Douyin and Bilibili, etc., as well as on the audio livestreaming platform Himalayan. Other online activities were carried out via social media and e-commerce platforms including WeChat, Vlog, Taobao, Tianmao, Jingdong, Meituan and Tencent. Shaanxi History Museum (SHM) represents one of the typical examples of cultural institutions that bolstered their online activities during the pandemic. This article explores the effects of Chinese museums’ livestreaming activities, which constituted the core of their online initiatives during the pandemic. By reviewing different types of livestreaming activities carried out by museums, as well as conducting online surveys, face-to-face interviews and analysing data surrounding the Shaanxi History Museum, it will critically discuss the advantages and disadvantages of Chinese museums’ livestreaming activities, with potential implications for museums in China and worldwide. Ultimately, it suggests that Chinese museums’ development of online activities relies on applying a systematic, diversified and digitalisation-driven communication strategy.

4.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-329407

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has a severe impact on global public health, and the emerging variants threaten the efficacy of the circulating vaccines. Here, we report that a single vaccination with a non-replicated Chimpanzee adenovirus-based vaccine against the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 variant (JS1-delta) elicits potent humoral, cellular and mucosal immunity in mice. Additionally, a single intranasal administration of JS1-delta provides sufficient protection against B.1.617.2 challenge in mice. This study indicates that Chimpanzee adenovirus type 3 (ChAd3) derived vector represents a promising platform for antiviral vaccine development against respiratory infections, and that JS1-delta is worth further investigation in human clinical trials.

5.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(30): 9050-9058, 2021 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524638

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, there have been many new cases of coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, Hubei Province, which has gradually spread throughout the country. AIM: To explore our hospital's innovative management system to ensure the efficient operation of fever clinics during the epidemic, since controlling the spread of disease is an important way to prevent and control the epidemic. METHODS: In total, 200 outpatients with fever at our hospital between November 2019 and July 2020 were selected and allocated into two groups. RESULTS: The fever clinic in our hospital operated smoothly, and infection with the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has not been reported in our hospital. Additionally, we did not have any cases of missed diagnosis. The awareness regarding COVID-19 infection sources, transmission routes, early symptoms, and preventive measures was significantly higher in our fever clinic than in those of the pre-management group. CONCLUSION: "An integrated system, three separate responsibilities" ensured the efficient functioning of our fever outpatient clinic and early screening of COVID-19 cases, which effectively curbed the transmission of COVID-19 and hence prevented COVID-19 pneumonia epidemic in our hospital, ultimately achieving the maximum effect of epidemic prevention and control.

6.
Kidney Int Rep ; 6(9): 2525, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433185

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2020.07.010.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2021.07.022.].

7.
Kidney Int Rep ; 6(9): 2526-2531, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385531

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2021.07.021.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1016/j.ekir.2020.07.010.].

8.
Nat Med ; 26(9): 1494, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387438

ABSTRACT

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.

9.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1215-1224, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343625

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) urgently calls for more sensitive molecular diagnosis to improve sensitivity of current viral nuclear acid detection. We have developed an anchor primer (AP)-based assay to improve viral RNA stability by bioinformatics identification of RNase-binding site of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) RNA and implementing AP dually targeting the N gene of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and RNase 1, 3, 6. The arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR) improvement of viral RNA integrity was supported by (a) the AP increased resistance of the targeted gene (N gene) of SARS-CoV-2 RNA to RNase treatment; (b) the detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA by AP-PCR with lower cycle threshold values (-2.7 cycles) compared to two commercially available assays; (c) improvement of the viral RNA stability of the ORF gene upon targeting of the N gene and RNase. Furthermore, the improved sensitivity by AP-PCR was demonstrated by detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in 70-80% of sputum, nasal, pharyngeal swabs and feces and 36% (4/11) of urine of the confirmed cases (n = 252), 7% convalescent cases (n = 54) and none of 300 negative cases. Lastly, AP-PCR analysis of 306 confirmed and convalescent cases revealed prolonged presence of viral loading for >20 days after the first positive diagnosis. Thus, the AP dually targeting SARS-CoV-2 RNA and RNase improves molecular detection by preserving SARS-CoV-2 RNA integrity and reveals the prolonged viral loading associated with older age and male gender in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Ribonucleases/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Aged , Binding Sites , Female , Humans , Male , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Load
10.
Infect Dis Ther ; 10(3): 1267-1285, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1210749

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was defined as a species of beta coronavirus causing atypical respiratory disease in humans. The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in an unprecedented health and economic crisis worldwide. Little is known about the specifics of its influence on people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) (PLWHA). In this study, we aim to investigate the prevalence and mortality in PLWHA co-infected with COVID-19. METHODS: The databases PUBMED, EMBASE, BioRxiv, and medRxiv were searched up to 9 March 2021 to explore the prevalence and mortality rate of COVID-19 in PLWHA. Cohort studies and case series meeting the inclusion criteria were included in this review. RESULTS: We identified 14 eligible studies, 9 of which were cohort and 5 were case series. A total of 203,761 patients with COVID-19 were identified (7718 PLWHA vs. 196,043 non-PLWHA). Meta-analyses estimated the prevalence and mortality rate of COVID-19 in PLWHA was 0.774% [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.00393-0.01517] and 8.814% (95% CI 0.05766-0.13245) respectively. COVID-19 co-infected PLWHA do not seem to be associated with higher mortality, as compared to non-PLWHA [relative risk (RR) 0.96 (95% CI 0.88-1.06)]. The presence of comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, RR 5.2 (95% CI 4.25-6.36), hypertension and chronic cardiac disease, RR 4.2 (95% CI 1.09-16.10), and chronic kidney disease, RR 8.43 (95% CI 5.49-12.93) were associated with an increased mortality in COVID-19 co-infected PLWHA. CONCLUSION: The estimated prevalence and mortality rate of COVID-19 in PLWHA were 0.774% and 8.814%, respectively. Since most of the included studies used unmatched populations, comparisons between PLWHA and non-PLWHA should be interpreted with caution. Further investigations are needed for a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between cluster of differentiation 4 cell count, HIV viral load, antiretroviral therapy, and COVID-19 related prognosis in PLWHA.

11.
Nat Med ; 26(8): 1193-1195, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-541699

ABSTRACT

Detection of asymptomatic or subclinical novel human coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 infection is critical for understanding the overall prevalence and infection potential of COVID-19. To estimate the cumulative prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in China, we evaluated the host serologic response, measured by the levels of immunoglobulins M and G in 17,368 individuals, in the city of Wuhan, the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in China, and geographic regions in the country, during the period from 9 March 2020 to 10 April 2020. In our cohorts, the seropositivity in Wuhan varied between 3.2% and 3.8% in different subcohorts. Seroposivity progressively decreased in other cities as the distance to the epicenter increased. Patients who visited a hospital for maintenance hemodialysis and healthcare workers also had a higher seroprevalence of 3.3% (51 of 1,542, 2.5-4.3%, 95% confidence interval (CI)) and 1.8% (81 of 4,384, 1.5-2.3%, 95% CI), respectively. More studies are needed to determine whether these results are generalizable to other populations and geographic locations, as well as to determine at what rate seroprevalence is increasing with the progress of the COVID-19 pandemic. Serologic surveillance has the potential to provide a more faithful cumulative viral attack rate for the first season of this novel SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies
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