Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-323568

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited information on the difference in epidemiology, clinical characteristics and outcomes of the initial outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Wuhan (the epicenter) and Sichuan (the peripheral area) in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was conducted to investigate the differences in the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 between the epicenter and peripheral areas of pandemic and thereby generate information that would be potentially helpful in formulating clinical practice recommendations to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The Sichuan & Wuhan Collaboration Research Group for COVID-19 established two retrospective cohorts that separately reflect the epicenter and peripheral area during the early pandemic. The epidemiology, clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients in the two groups were compared. Multivariate regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with regard to the outcomes. Results: The Wuhan (epicenter) cohort included 710 randomly selected patients, and the peripheral (Sichuan) cohort included 474 consecutive patients. A higher proportion of patients from the periphery had upper airway symptoms, whereas a lower proportion of patients in the epicenter had lower airway symptoms and comorbidities. Patients in the epicenter had a higher risk of death (aOR=7.64), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (aOR=1.66), delayed time from illness onset to hospital and ICU admission (aOR=6.29 and aOR=8.03, respectively), and prolonged duration of viral shedding (aOR=1.64). Conclusions: The worse outcomes in the epicenter could be explained by the prolonged time from illness onset to hospital and ICU admission. This could potentially have been associated with elevated systemic inflammation secondary to organ dysfunction and prolonged duration of virus shedding independent of age and comorbidities. Thus, early supportive care could achieve better clinical outcomes.

2.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 14(6):241-253, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1310155

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) strategies in COVID-19 patients differ from those in patients suffering from cardiogenic cardiac arrest. During CPR, both healthcare and non-healthcare workers who provide resuscitation are at risk of infection. The Working Group for Expert Consensus on Prevention and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Cardiac Arrest in COVID-19 has developed this Chinese Expert Consensus to guide clinical practice of CPR in COVID-19 patients. Main recommendations: (1) A medical team should be assigned to evaluate severe and critical COVID-19 for early monitoring of cardiac-arrest warning signs. (2) Psychological counseling and treatment are highly recommended, since sympathetic and vagal abnormalities induced by psychological stress from the COVID-19 pandemic can induce cardiac arrest. (3) Healthcare workers should wear personal protective equipment (PPE). (4) Mouth-to-mouth ventilation should be avoided on patients suspected of having or diagnosed with COVID-19. (5) Hands-only chest compression and mechanical chest compression are recommended. (6) Tracheal-intubation procedures should be optimized and tracheal-intubation strategies should be implemented early. (7) CPR should be provided for 20-30 min. (8) Various factors should be taken into consideration such as the interests of patients and family members, ethics, transmission risks, and laws and regulations governing infectious disease control. Changes in management: The following changes or modifications to CPR strategy in COVID-19 patients are proposed: (1) Healthcare workers should wear PPE. (2) Hands-only chest compression and mechanical chest compression can be implemented to reduce or avoid the spread of viruses by aerosols. (3) Both the benefits to patients and the risk of infection should be considered. (4) Hhealthcare workers should be fully aware of and trained in CPR strategies and procedures specifically for patients with COVID-19.

3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 206, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is limited information on the difference in epidemiology, clinical characteristics and outcomes of the initial outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Wuhan (the epicenter) and Sichuan (the peripheral area) in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study was conducted to investigate the differences in the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients with COVID-19 between the epicenter and peripheral areas of pandemic and thereby generate information that would be potentially helpful in formulating clinical practice recommendations to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The Sichuan & Wuhan Collaboration Research Group for COVID-19 established two retrospective cohorts that separately reflect the epicenter and peripheral area during the early pandemic. The epidemiology, clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients in the two groups were compared. Multivariate regression analyses were used to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (aOR) with regard to the outcomes. RESULTS: The Wuhan (epicenter) cohort included 710 randomly selected patients, and the peripheral (Sichuan) cohort included 474 consecutive patients. A higher proportion of patients from the periphery had upper airway symptoms, whereas a lower proportion of patients in the epicenter had lower airway symptoms and comorbidities. Patients in the epicenter had a higher risk of death (aOR=7.64), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (aOR=1.66), delayed time from illness onset to hospital and ICU admission (aOR=6.29 and aOR=8.03, respectively), and prolonged duration of viral shedding (aOR=1.64). CONCLUSIONS: The worse outcomes in the epicenter could be explained by the prolonged time from illness onset to hospital and ICU admission. This could potentially have been associated with elevated systemic inflammation secondary to organ dysfunction and prolonged duration of virus shedding independent of age and comorbidities. Thus, early supportive care could achieve better clinical outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Virus Shedding
4.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0245690, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043425

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The number of hospitalized young coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients has increased significantly. However, specific data about COVID-19 patients under 65 years old who are admitted to the hospital are scarce. METHODS: The COVID-19 patients under 65 years old who were admitted to the hospital in Sichuan Province, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, and Wuhan Red Cross Hospital were included in this study. Demographic information, laboratory data and clinical treatment courses were extracted from electronic medical records. Risk factors associated with oxygen therapy were explored. RESULTS: Eight hundred thirty-three COVID-19 patients under 65 years old were included. Of the included patients, 29.4% had one or more comorbidities. Oxygen therapy was required in 63.1% of these patients, and the mortality was 2.9% among the oxygen therapy patients. Fever (odds ratio [OR] 2.072, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.312-3.271, p = 0.002), dyspnea (OR 2.522, 95% CI 1.213-5.243, p = 0.013), chest distress (OR 2.278, 95% CI 1.160-4.473, p = 0.017), elevated respiratory rate (OR 1.114, 95% CI 1.010-1.228, p = 0.031), and decreased albumin (OR 0.932, 95% CI 0.880-0.987, p = 0.016) and globulin levels (OR 0.929, 95% 0.881-0.980, p = 0.007) were independent factors related to oxygen therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Oxygen therapy is highly required in COVID-19 patients under 65 years old who are admitted to the hospital, but the success rate is high. Respiratory failure-related symptoms, elevated respiratory rate, low albumin and globulin levels, and fever at admission are independent risk factors related to the requirement of oxygen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/methods , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Dyspnea/complications , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy/adverse effects , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
7.
Respiration ; 99(9): 755-763, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910309

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Effective auscultations are often hard to implement in isolation wards. To date, little is known about the characteristics of pulmonary auscultation in novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pneumonia. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore the features and clinical significance of pulmonary auscultation in COVID-19 pneumonia using an electronic stethoscope in isolation wards. METHODS: This cross-sectional, observational study was conducted among patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 at Wuhan Red-Cross Hospital during the period from January 27, 2020, to February 12, 2020. Standard auscultation with an electronic stethoscope was performed and electronic recordings of breath sounds were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifty-seven patients with average age of 60.6 years were enrolled. The most common symptoms were cough (73.7%) during auscultation. Most cases had bilateral lesions (96.4%) such as multiple ground-glass opacities (69.1%) and fibrous stripes (21.8%). High-quality auscultation recordings (98.8%) were obtained, and coarse breath sounds, wheezes, coarse crackles, fine crackles, and Velcro crackles were identified. Most cases had normal breath sounds in upper lungs, but the proportions of abnormal breath sounds increased in the basal fields where Velcro crackles were more commonly identified at the posterior chest. The presence of fine and coarse crackles detected 33/39 patients with ground-glass opacities (sensitivity 84.6% and specificity 12.5%) and 8/9 patients with consolidation (sensitivity 88.9% and specificity 15.2%), while the presence of Velcro crackles identified 16/39 patients with ground-glass opacities (sensitivity 41% and specificity 81.3%). CONCLUSIONS: The abnormal breath sounds in COVID-19 pneumonia had some consistent distributive characteristics and to some extent correlated with the radiologic features. Such evidence suggests that electronic auscultation is useful to aid diagnosis and timely management of the disease. Further studies are indicated to validate the accuracy and potential clinical benefit of auscultation in detecting pulmonary abnormalities in COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Auscultation , COVID-19/physiopathology , Lung/physiopathology , Respiratory Sounds/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , China , Cough/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Electrical Equipment and Supplies , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index , Smartphone , Sound Spectrography , Sputum , Stethoscopes , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
9.
Heart ; 106(15): 1154-1159, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-155332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We sought to explore the prevalence and immediate clinical implications of acute myocardial injury in a cohort of patients with COVID-19 in a region of China where medical resources are less stressed than in Wuhan (the epicentre of the pandemic). METHODS: We prospectively assessed the medical records, laboratory results, chest CT images and use of medication in a cohort of patients presenting to two designated covid-19 treatment centres in Sichuan, China. Outcomes of interest included death, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), need for mechanical ventilation, treatment with vasoactive agents and classification of disease severity. Acute myocardial injury was defined by a value of high-sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) greater than the normal upper limit. RESULTS: A total of 101 cases were enrolled from January to 10 March 2020 (average age 49 years, IQR 34-62 years). Acute myocardial injury was present in 15.8% of patients, nearly half of whom had a hs-TnT value fivefold greater than the normal upper limit. Patients with acute myocardial injury were older, with a higher prevalence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease and more likely to require ICU admission (62.5% vs 24.7%, p=0.003), mechanical ventilation (43.5% vs 4.7%, p<0.001) and treatment with vasoactive agents (31.2% vs 0%, p<0.001). Log hs-TnT was associated with disease severity (OR 6.63, 95% CI 2.24 to 19.65), and all of the three deaths occurred in patients with acute myocardial injury. CONCLUSION: Acute myocardial injury is common in patients with COVID-19 and is associated with adverse prognosis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Troponin T/blood , Adult , Age Factors , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Biomarkers/blood , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Agents/therapeutic use , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Glomerular Filtration Rate , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Natriuretic Peptide, Brain/blood , Pandemics , Peptide Fragments/blood , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL