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1.
Disease Surveillance ; 37(1):12-16, 2022.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1789473

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19)in December 2021 and the risk of importation.

2.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(12):1235-1239, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1771274

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in November 2021 and the risk of importation.

3.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(11):1112-1116, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1726093

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in October 2021 and the risk of importation.

4.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(10):985-989, 2021.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1726087

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in September 2021 and the risk of importation.

5.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(9):864-868, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1575232

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in August 2021 and the risk of importation.

6.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259706, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: China is vulnerable to zoonotic disease transmission due to a large agricultural work force, sizable domestic livestock population, and a highly biodiverse ecology. To better address this threat, representatives from the human, animal, and environmental health sectors in China held a One Health Zoonotic Disease Prioritization (OHZDP) workshop in May 2019 to develop a list of priority zoonotic diseases for multisectoral, One Health collaboration. METHODS: Representatives used the OHZDP Process, developed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC), to prioritize zoonotic diseases for China. Representatives defined the criteria used for prioritization and determined questions and weights for each individual criterion. A review of English and Chinese literature was conducted prior to the workshop to collect disease specific information on prevalence, morbidity, mortality, and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) from China and the Western Pacific Region for zoonotic diseases considered for prioritization. RESULTS: Thirty zoonotic diseases were evaluated for prioritization. Criteria selected included: 1) disease hazard/severity (case fatality rate) in humans, 2) epidemic scale and intensity (in humans and animals) in China, 3) economic impact, 4) prevention and control, and 5) social impact. Disease specific information was obtained from 792 articles (637 in English and 155 in Chinese) and subject matter experts for the prioritization process. Following discussion of the OHZDP Tool output among disease experts, five priority zoonotic diseases were identified for China: avian influenza, echinococcosis, rabies, plague, and brucellosis. CONCLUSION: Representatives agreed on a list of five priority zoonotic diseases that can serve as a foundation to strengthen One Health collaboration for disease prevention and control in China; this list was developed prior to the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 pandemic. Next steps focused on establishing a multisectoral, One Health coordination mechanism, improving multisectoral linkages in laboratory testing and surveillance platforms, creating multisectoral preparedness and response plans, and increasing workforce capacity.


Subject(s)
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic , Zoonoses/prevention & control , Animals , China , Humans , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/transmission
7.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(8):751-755, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1524242

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in July 2021 and the risk of importation.

8.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(7):645-649, 2021.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1436124

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in June 2021 and the risk of importation.

9.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(6):521-525, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1374561

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in May 2021 and the risk of importation.

10.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(5):406-410, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1352843

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in April 2021 and the risk of importation.

11.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(4):307-311, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1302609

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) in March 2021 and the risk of importation.

12.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(3):204-208, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1302604

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global epidemic of COVID-19 in February 2021 and the risk of importation.

13.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(2):110-113, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1229334

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the global COVID-19 pandemic in January 2021 and the risk of imported cases to China.

14.
Disease Surveillance ; 36(1):11-15, 2021.
Article in Chinese | GIM | ID: covidwho-1190526

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the risk of Coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) pandemic worldwide in December 2020 and the risk of imported cases posed to China.

15.
Infect Dis Poverty ; 10(1): 21, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1112454

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Considering the widespread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in the world, it is important to understand the spatiotemporal development of the pandemic. In this study, we aimed to visualize time-associated alterations of COVID-19 in the context of continents and countries. METHODS: Using COVID-19 case and death data from February to December 2020 offered by Johns Hopkins University, we generated time-associated balloon charts with multiple epidemiological indicators including crude case fatality rate (CFR), morbidity, mortality and the total number of cases, to compare the progression of the pandemic within a specific period across regions and countries, integrating seven related dimensions together. The area chart is used to supplement the display of the balloon chart in daily new COVID-19 case changes in UN geographic regions over time. Javascript and Vega-Lite were chosen for programming and mapping COVID-19 data in browsers for visualization. RESULTS: From February 1st to December 20th 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic spread across UN subregions in the chronological order. It was first reported in East Asia, and then became noticeable in Europe (South, West and North), North America, East Europe and West Asia, Central and South America, Southern Africa, Caribbean, South Asia, North Africa, Southeast Asia and Oceania, causing several waves of epidemics in different regions. Since October, the balloons of Europe, North America and West Asia have been rising rapidly, reaching a dramatically high morbidity level ranging from 200 to 500/10 000 by December, suggesting an emerging winter wave of COVID-19 which was much bigger than the previous ones. By late December 2020, some European and American countries displayed a leading mortality as high as or over 100/100 000, represented by Belgium, Czechia, Spain, France, Italy, UK, Hungary, Bulgaria, Peru, USA, Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. The mortality of Iran was the highest in Asia (over 60/100 000), and that of South Africa topped in Africa (40/100 000). In the last 15 days, the CFRs of most countries were at low levels of less than 5%, while Mexico had exceptional high CFR close to 10%. CONCLUSIONS: We creatively used visualization integrating 7-dimensional epidemiologic and spatiotemporal indicators to assess the progression of COVID-19 pandemic in terms of transmissibility and severity. Such methodology allows public health workers and policy makers to understand the epidemics comparatively and flexibly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Public Health Surveillance/methods , Computer Graphics , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Spatio-Temporal Analysis
16.
China CDC Wkly ; 3(8): 159-161, 2021 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1058745

ABSTRACT

WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS TOPIC?: Several outbreaks of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) occurred in Hong Kong in 2020, and the response had varied results based on the strength of policy measures and on compliance of the population. WHAT IS ADDED BY THIS REPORT?: By analyzing data of COVID-19 cases in Hong Kong, combined with the Google Mobility Trends and Oxford COVID-19 Government Response Tracker, we make recommendations for the future prevention and control of the epidemic in Hong Kong. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE?: Monitoring data reflecting multiple aspects, such as the epidemic situation, the mobility behavior of people, and government policy, is helpful for public health practitioners and policymakers to understand the interaction between various factors and to precisely adjust COVID-19 control policies.

17.
Disease Surveillance ; 35(4):283-287, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-833191

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyze the COVID-19 epidemics in 14 land-bordering countries of China, evaluate the risk of imported cases to China, and provide evidence for the further prevention of imported COVID-19.

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