Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316032

ABSTRACT

Despite widespread interest in the pathophysiology of COVID-19 in respiratory and cardiovascular systems, little is known about the morphologic and molecular changes in the testis of patients with COVID-19 and the effects of SARS-CoV-2 infection on male fertility. We report here on the pathophysiology and molecular feature of testes obtained at autopsy from six men with COVID-19, as compared with those of testes from three men with age-matched, uninfected SARS-CoV-2. Our histopathological results showed that all COVID-19 patients had severe spermatogenesis damages compared with controls. Importantly, we detected the nuclear acid of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, viral particles, and SARS-CoV-2 spike S1 protein in COVID-19 patient testes, and we also found ACE2 and TMPRSS2 significantly elevated in the testes from COVID-19 patients. Furthermore, we observed a prominent leukocyte infiltration, including CD3+ T lymphocytes, CD20+ B lymphocytes, CD68+ macrophages, HLA-DR+ myeloid cells, and CD38+ plasma cells in the testes of COVID-19 patients. RNA-Seq analyses further revealed SARS-CoV-2 infection could lead to dysfunction of the genes that regulate the spermatogenesis and inflammation response-related pathways. Collectively, our pathological and molecular examination findings indicate that SARS-CoV-2 could directly attack testicular cells, thereby inducing the damage of testicular immune privilege and spermatogenesis defects.

2.
Front Immunol ; 12: 631044, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1094169

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been raging around the world since January 2020. Pregnancy places the women in a unique immune scenario which may allow severe COVID-19 disease. In this regard, the potential unknown effects of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) on mothers and fetuses have attracted considerable attention. There is no clear consistent evidence of the changes in the immune status of pregnant women after recovery from COVID-19. In this study, we use multiparameter flow cytometry and Luminex assay to determine the immune cell subsets and cytokines, respectively, in the peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood from pregnant women recovering from COVID-19 about 3 months (n=5). Our results showed decreased percentages of Tc2, Tfh17, memory B cells, virus-specific NK cells, and increased percentages of naive B cells in the peripheral blood. Serum levels of IL-1ra and MCP-1 showed a decreased tendency in late recovery stage (LRS) patients. Meanwhile, there was no significant difference in immune cell subsets in the umbilical cord blood. The placentas from LRS patients showed increased CD68+ macrophages infiltration and mild hypoxic features. The inflammatory damage of the placenta may be related to the antiviral response. Since the receptors, ACE2 and TMPRSS2, utilized by SARS-CoV-2 are not co-expressed in the placenta, so it is extremely rare for SARS-CoV-2 to cause infection through this route and the impact on the fetus is negligible.


Subject(s)
B-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Fetal Blood/immunology , Germinal Center/immunology , Placenta/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Th17 Cells/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Autoantigens/metabolism , Female , Flow Cytometry , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Immunophenotyping , Killer Cells, Natural , Pregnancy , Receptors, Interleukin-1/metabolism , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
5.
Am J Reprod Immunol ; 84(5): e13304, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-960753

ABSTRACT

Caused by a novel type of virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) constitutes a global public health emergency. Pregnant women are considered to have a higher risk of severe morbidity and even mortality due to their susceptibility to respiratory pathogens and their particular immunologic state. Several studies assessing SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy reported adverse pregnancy outcomes in patients with severe conditions, including spontaneous abortion, preterm labor, fetal distress, cesarean section, preterm birth, neonatal asphyxia, neonatal pneumonia, stillbirth, and neonatal death. However, whether these complications are causally related to SARS-CoV-2 infection is not clear. Here, we reviewed the scientific evidence supporting the contributing role of Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in the uncontrolled systemic inflammation characterizing severe cases of COVID-19. Based on the recognized harmful effects of these CD4+ T-cell subset imbalances in pregnancy, we speculated that SARS-CoV-2 infection might lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes through the deregulation of otherwise tightly regulated Treg/Th17 ratios, and to subsequent uncontrolled systemic inflammation. Moreover, we discuss the possibility of vertical transmission of COVID-19 from infected mothers to their infants, which could also explain adverse perinatal outcomes. Rigorous monitoring of pregnancies and appropriate measures should be taken to prevent and treat early eventual maternal and perinatal complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory/immunology , Th17 Cells/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pandemics , Pregnancy Outcome
7.
J Reprod Immunol ; 141: 103168, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597787

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic is affecting various areas of health care, including human reproduction. Many women with reproductive failures, during the peri-implantation period and pregnancy, are on the immunotherapy using immune modulators and immunosuppressant due to underlying autoimmune diseases, cellular immune dysfunction, and rheumatic conditions. Many questions have been raised for women with immunotherapy during the COVID-19 pandemic, including infection susceptibility, how to manage women with an increased risk of and active COVID-19 infection. SARS-CoV-2 is a novel virus, and not enough information exists. Yet, we aim to review the data from previous coronavirus outbreaks and current COVID-19 and provide interim guidelines for immunotherapy in women with reproductive failures.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Immunotherapy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pregnancy Complications/drug therapy , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Reproductive Health , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Reprod Immunol ; 139: 103122, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-27137

ABSTRACT

The 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was first detected in December 2019 and became epidemic in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. COVID-19 has been rapidly spreading out in China and all over the world. The virus causing COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2 has been known to be genetically similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) but distinct from it. Clinical manifestation of COVID-19 can be characterized by mild upper respiratory tract infection, lower respiratory tract infection involving non-life threatening pneumonia, and life-threatening pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome. It affects all age groups, including newborns, to the elders. Particularly, pregnant women may be more susceptible to COVID-19 since pregnant women, in general, are vulnerable to respiratory infection. In pregnant women with COVID-19, there is no evidence for vertical transmission of the virus, but an increased prevalence of preterm deliveries has been noticed. The COVID-19 may alter immune responses at the maternal-fetal interface, and affect the well-being of mothers and infants. In this review, we focused on the reason why pregnant women are more susceptible to COVID-19 and the potential maternal and fetal complications from an immunological viewpoint.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Susceptibility/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Premature Birth/etiology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL