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1.
Nutrients ; 14(18)2022 Sep 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2033074

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-related lockdown measures have been affecting children's weight status and weight-related behaviors, which are often associated with an increase in childhood obesity. However, large-scale longitudinal studies are lacking. Our study aimed to analyze changes in obesity and weight-related behaviors in Chinese children before and during the COVID-19 pandemic and provide references for addressing the high prevalence of childhood obesity. A prospective multi-center longitudinal survey was conducted among Chinese children (n = 5963), collecting data on weight status, COVID-19-related measures, and lifestyle behaviors. Changes were assessed using t-tests and χ2 tests for paired samples, or the Wilcoxon signed-rank test, according to the type and distribution of data. The Generalized Estimating Equations model was used to explore influential factors of obesity. The prevalence of overweight and obesity increased from 9.2% and 8.6% before the pandemic to 10.5% and 10.6% during the pandemic (p < 0.001), respectively. Daily physical activity, sleep duration, and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption decreased while screen time increased. The results of the generalized estimating equations showed that ethnic minority, older age, less daily physical activity, reduced sleep duration, and longer screen time were positively associated with obesity. There is an intensifying trend of obesity in children in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, to which altered weight-related behaviors might have contributed largely. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, especially in social crises, should be highlighted to ease the burden of childhood obesity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatric Obesity , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Ethnicity , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Minority Groups , Pandemics , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
2.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 60(12): 31-37, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903574

ABSTRACT

The current study assessed the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on resilience among Chinese adolescents and explored its influential factors. A total of 2,359 students were recruited from three middle schools through cluster randomization in Chengdu. Data were collected before and after home confinement due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Resilience, family function, and effect of the pandemic were measured using subscales of the Chinese Positive Youth Development Scale, Chinese Family Assessment Instrument, and Children's Revised Impact of Event Scale. Paired samples t test showed resilience decreased significantly after confinement. According to stepwise multiple linear regression, basal resilience, family dysfunction, higher frequencies of hyperarousal symptoms of posttraumatic stress, increased electronic device use, and relationship with caregivers were independent influential factors of resilience. COVID-19 negatively affected adolescents' resilience; therefore, stakeholders need to focus on improving resilience in this population to mitigate mental health impacts of acute stressful events. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 60(12), 31-37.].

3.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 70: 102793, 2022 Feb 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1683179

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to determine the trajectories of physical activity and depressive symptoms and their reciprocal relationship among community-dwelling older adults in the COVID-19 pandemic era. The study population consisted of a cohort of 511 participants aged 60 years and over, who were recruited from eight community health centers in Ya'an, China. The Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly and the Patient Health Questionnaire were respectively used to measure physical activity and depressive symptoms at three time points: before the COVID-19 outbreak (T0), during the outbreak period (T1), and after the subsidence of COVID-19 (T2). The results revealed that physical activity and depressive symptoms fluctuated substantially across T0, T1, and T2. In addition, more severe depressive symptoms at T0 and T1 were significantly associated with lower levels of physical activity at T1 and T2, but the obverse direction of physical activity being associated with subsequent depressive symptoms was not observed in the current study. These findings highlight the importance of supporting old people to remain physically active and combat mental distress early in a pandemic, and prevention and management of depressive symptoms may also be beneficial to promote physical activity.

4.
International journal of disaster risk reduction : IJDRR ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1615232

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study is to determine the trajectories of physical activity and depressive symptoms and their reciprocal relationship among community-dwelling older adults in the COVID-19 pandemic era. The study population consisted of a cohort of 511 participants aged 60 years and over, who were recruited from eight community health centers in Ya'an, China. The Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly and the Patient Health Questionnaire were respectively used to measure physical activity and depressive symptoms at three time points: before the COVID-19 outbreak (T0), during the outbreak period (T1), and after the subsidence of COVID-19 (T2). The results revealed that physical activity and depressive symptoms fluctuated substantially across T0, T1, and T2. In addition, more severe depressive symptoms at T0 and T1 were significantly associated with lower levels of physical activity at T1 and T2, but the obverse direction of physical activity being associated with subsequent depressive symptoms was not observed in the current study. These findings highlight the importance of supporting old people to remain physically active and combat mental distress early in a pandemic, and prevention and management of depressive symptoms may also be beneficial to promote physical activity.

5.
Sleep Med ; 84: 289-293, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294236

ABSTRACT

Depression is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and the leading cause of disability among adolescents, with sleep duration as its vital influential factor. Adolescents might be mentally sensitive to the stress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, the alteration of adolescents' sleep duration, depression, and their associations within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic have not been well documented. We conducted a longitudinal study, recruiting 2496 adolescents from 3 junior high schools to examine the alteration of their sleep duration and depressive symptoms before and during the pandemic, and to explore their potential association(s). Data were collected before (December 2019) and during the pandemic (July 2020). Paired samples t-test revealed a significant decrease in sleep duration and a significant increase in depressive symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. Higher grades, COVID-19 infection history, higher CES-DC score, and the COVID-19 pandemic itself might contribute to decreased sleep duration, while longer exercise duration during the pandemic might be a protective factor. According to the cross-lagged analysis, the existence of depressive symptoms before the pandemic was significantly associated with a shorter sleep duration during the pandemic (ß = -0.106, p < 0.001). Previously shortened sleep duration was significantly associated with a greater likelihood of depressive symptoms during the pandemic (ß = -0.082, p < 0.001). Our findings revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic has a negative influence on adolescents' mental health and sleep. Mental preparedness should be highlighted to mitigate the psychosocial influences of any possible public emergencies in the future. Sleep duration represents a viable home-based intervention for depressive symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Adolescent , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
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