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1.
J Pharm Biomed Anal ; 217: 114827, 2022 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1983535

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection evokes various systemic alterations that push patients not only towards severe acute respiratory syndrome but causes an important metabolic dysregulation with following multi-organ alteration and potentially poor outcome. To discover novel potential biomarkers able to predict disease's severity and patient's outcome, in this study we applied untargeted lipidomics, by a reversed phase ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-trapped ion mobility mass spectrometry platform (RP-UHPLC-TIMS-MS), on blood samples collected at hospital admission in an Italian cohort of COVID-19 patients (45 mild, 54 severe, 21 controls). In a subset of patients, we also collected a second blood sample in correspondence of clinical phenotype modification (longitudinal population). Plasma lipid profiles revealed several lipids significantly modified in COVID-19 patients with respect to controls and able to discern between mild and severe clinical phenotype. Severe patients were characterized by a progressive decrease in the levels of LPCs, LPC-Os, PC-Os, and, on the contrary, an increase in overall TGs, PEs, and Ceramides. A machine learning model was built by using both the entire dataset and with a restricted lipid panel dataset, delivering comparable results in predicting severity (AUC= 0.777, CI: 0.639-0.904) and outcome (AUC= 0.789, CI: 0.658-0.910). Finally, re-building the model with 25 longitudinal (t1) samples, this resulted in 21 patients correctly classified. In conclusion, this study highlights specific lipid profiles that could be used monitor the possible trajectory of COVID-19 patients at hospital admission, which could be used in targeted approaches.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lipidomics , Biomarkers , Humans , Ion Mobility Spectrometry , Lipids
2.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 11(2): e0118221, 2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673355

ABSTRACT

The coding-complete severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genome sequences from 15 nasopharyngeal swabs collected in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, during the period from December 2020 to March 2021 were determined using Illumina MiSeq technology. A sequence analysis identified that the B.1 SARS-CoV-2 lineage was most prevalent with the worrying emergence of B.1.1.7 in June 2021.

3.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(47): e0095221, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532971

ABSTRACT

Here, we report the genome sequences of five severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strains that were obtained from symptomatic individuals with travel histories during community surveillance in the Dominican Republic in 2020. These sequences provide a starting point for further genomic studies of gene flow and molecular diversity in the Caribbean nation. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that all genomes correspond to the B.1 variant.

4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(36)2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1366850

ABSTRACT

To investigate the evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the immune population, we coincupi bated the authentic virus with a highly neutralizing plasma from a COVID-19 convalescent patient. The plasma fully neutralized the virus for seven passages, but, after 45 d, the deletion of F140 in the spike N-terminal domain (NTD) N3 loop led to partial breakthrough. At day 73, an E484K substitution in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) occurred, followed, at day 80, by an insertion in the NTD N5 loop containing a new glycan sequon, which generated a variant completely resistant to plasma neutralization. Computational modeling predicts that the deletion and insertion in loops N3 and N5 prevent binding of neutralizing antibodies. The recent emergence in the United Kingdom, South Africa, Brazil, and Japan of natural variants with similar changes suggests that SARS-CoV-2 has the potential to escape an effective immune response and that vaccines and antibodies able to control emerging variants should be developed.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/genetics , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/genetics , Antibodies, Viral/pharmacology , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Convalescence , Gene Expression , Humans , Immune Evasion , Immune Sera/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Vero Cells
5.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(4)2021 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117311

ABSTRACT

The coding-complete genome sequence of a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strain isolated from an Iraqi patient was sequenced for the first-time using Illumina MiSeq technology. There was a D614G mutation in the spike protein-coding sequence. This report is valuable for better understanding the spread of the virus in Iraq.

6.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(4)2021 Jan 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1054614

ABSTRACT

The coding-complete genome sequence of a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) strain isolated from an Iraqi patient was sequenced for the first-time using Illumina MiSeq technology. There was a D614G mutation in the spike protein-coding sequence. This report is valuable for better understanding the spread of the virus in Iraq.

7.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 7(10): ofaa421, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-756944

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia, progression to acute respiratory failure requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Severe dysregulated systemic inflammation is the putative mechanism. We hypothesize that early prolonged methylprednisolone (MP) treatment could accelerate disease resolution, decreasing the need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission and mortality. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter observational study to explore the association between exposure to prolonged, low-dose MP treatment and need for ICU referral, intubation, or death within 28 days (composite primary end point) in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia admitted to Italian respiratory high-dependency units. Secondary outcomes were invasive MV-free days and changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. RESULTS: Findings are reported as MP (n = 83) vs control (n = 90). The composite primary end point was met by 19 vs 40 (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.41; 95% CI, 0.24-0.72). Transfer to ICU and invasive MV were necessary in 15 vs 27 (P = .07) and 14 vs 26 (P = .10), respectively. By day 28, the MP group had fewer deaths (6 vs 21; aHR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.12-0.73) and more days off invasive MV (24.0 ±â€…9.0 vs 17.5 ±â€…12.8; P = .001). Study treatment was associated with rapid improvement in PaO2:FiO2 and CRP levels. The complication rate was similar for the 2 groups (P = .84). CONCLUSION: In patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, early administration of prolonged MP treatment was associated with a significantly lower hazard of death (71%) and decreased ventilator dependence. Treatment was safe and did not impact viral clearance. A large randomized controlled trial (RECOVERY trial) has been performed that validates these findings. Clinical trial registration. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04323592.

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