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1.
Z Herz Thorax Gefasschir ; : 1-5, 2022 Apr 26.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826452

ABSTRACT

Background: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can cause a severe and therapy-refractory acute respiratory distress syndrome. Temporary mechanical assistance by veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (v.v.-EMCO) is a well-established supportive therapy, but is still associated with a high mortality. Objective: This work aimed to identify potential effects of the ECMO cannulation strategy on the outcome in COVID-19 patients. Material and methods: All patients who were treated in a single center between March 2020 and November 2021 for COVID-19-related ARDS (n = 75) were prospectively entered into an institutional database. The patients were assigned into two groups with respect to the ECMO cannulation (femorofemoral: n = 20, femorojugular: n = 55) and the outcome was retrospectively analyzed. Results: We observed severe therapy-related adverse events in both groups in more than 70% of patients with sepsis being the most common (> 50% each). The outcome (successful ECMO weaning, in-hospital death, 6­month survival) was comparable in both groups. In-hospital mortality was about 70% each; however, the duration of event-free ECMO support seemed to be prolonged in the femorojugular group. Conclusion: Regardless of the support duration, v.v.-ECMO therapy for COVID-19 is associated with high mortality rates. The cannulation strategy did not impact on the outcome; however, femorojugular cannulation might prolong the event-free support duration and facilitate the mobilization of the patients during ECMO support.

2.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819933

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heart transplant (HTx) recipients are at increased risk of developing infections or malignancies due to immunosuppressive medication. Thus, regular aftercare in those patients is of utmost importance. The extent of collateral damage due to the COVID-19 pandemic (delayed or canceled clinical visits and diagnostics) on high-risk patients is yet unknown. We believe that, especially for HTx-patients, data acquisition on potential pandemic-related non-attendance is crucial to improve clinical care in the future. Therefore, we aim to decipher possible COVID-19-related alterations in attendance to clinical care post-HTx using a survey-based approach. METHODS: HTx recipients two years beyond transplantation were selected (n = 75). We filed a paper-based questionnaire or an online survey containing nine items about COVID-19 related exceptional circumstances. Fifty-two patients (69%) returned fully answered questionnaires. RESULTS: A perceived impact on daily life was evident with 79% of all patients reporting moderate to severe negative influence of COVID-19 pandemic on daily routine. We detected increased non-attendance of clinical care during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to pre-pandemic time (38% vs. 6%, p<0.0001). The various diagnostic modalities of aftercare were heterogeneously affected, ranging from 2% non-attendance for influence vaccination and 18% for colonoscopy. Off note, non-attendance to clinical care within the pandemic was independent of perceived impact of the pandemia on daily life (p>0.68). CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we objectively demonstrate significant decrease in attendance to clinical care in HTx recipients during COVID-19 pandemic. Efforts are needed to increase attendance in this highly vulnerable patient cohort. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-310496

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, the pandemic infection caused by SARS-CoV-2, may take highly variable clinical courses, ranging from symptom-free and pauci-symptomatic to fatal disease. The goal of the current study was to assess the association of COVID-19 clinical courses controlled by patients’ adaptive immune responses without progression to severe disease with patients’ Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genetics, the presence or absence of near-loss-of-function delta 32 deletion mutant of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) and AB0 blood group antigens. We further analyzed the association of these immunogenetic background characteristics with patients’ humoral antiviral immune response patterns, assessed longitudinally. The study enrolled 157 convalescent adult patients followed up for up to 250 days. Univariate HLA analyses identified putatively protective HLA alleles (HLA class II DRB1*01:01 and HLA class I B*35:01, with a trend for DRB1*03:01) associated with reduced durations of disease and decreased (rather than increased) total anti-S IgG levels providing virus neutralizing capacity comparable to non-carriers. Conversely, analyses also identified HLA alleles (HLA class II DQB1*03:2 und HLA class I B*15:01) not associated with such benefit in the patient cohort of this study. Hierarchical testing by Cox regression analyses confirmed the significance of the protective effect of the HLA alleles identified (when assessed in composite) in terms of disease duration, whereas AB0 blood group antigen heterozygosity was found to be significantly associated with disease severity (rather than duration) in our cohort. A seeming association of a heterozygous CCR5 delta 32 mutation with prolonged disease duration suggested by univariate analyses was not confirmed by hierarchical multivariate testing.In conclusion, the current study shows that the presence of certain "protective" HLA alleles is of even stronger association with reduced duration of mild and moderate COVID-19 than age or any other potential risk factor assessed. Prospective studies in larger patient populations assessing the impact of HLA genetics on the capacity of mounting protective vaccination responses may be warranted.

4.
ESC Heart Fail ; 8(6): 5568-5571, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449922

ABSTRACT

Adequate immune response to vaccination remains a challenge in patients after solid organ transplantation. We report a case of a 61-year-old male patient who received a left ventricular assist device as a bridge to transplant therapy. Three months before transplantation, he suffered mild SARS-CoV-2 infection and was successfully discharged thereafter. Eight days before his successful heart transplantation, he received mRNA BNT 162b2 vaccination. Immediately after transplantation, we detected sufficient rise of nucleocapsid and spike antibodies despite immune suppression therapy. We suspect potential booster effects of the previous SARS-CoV-2 infection giving rise to adequate immune response following single vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Transplantation , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Immunity , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
6.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 107, 2021 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412355

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, the pandemic disease caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2, may take highly variable clinical courses, ranging from symptom-free and pauci-symptomatic to fatal disease. The goal of the current study was to assess the association of COVID-19 clinical courses controlled by patients' adaptive immune responses without progression to severe disease with patients' Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genetics, AB0 blood group antigens, and the presence or absence of near-loss-of-function delta 32 deletion mutant of the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5). PATIENT AND METHODS: An exploratory observational study including 157 adult COVID-19 convalescent patients was performed with a median follow-up of 250 days. The impact of different HLA genotypes, AB0 blood group antigens, and the CCR5 mutant CD195 were investigated for their role in the clinical course of COVID-19. In addition, this study addressed levels of severity and morbidity of COVID-19. The association of the immunogenetic background parameters were further related to patients' humoral antiviral immune response patterns by longitudinal observation. RESULTS: Univariate HLA analyses identified putatively protective HLA alleles (HLA class II DRB1*01:01 and HLA class I B*35:01, with a trend for DRB1*03:01). They were associated with reduced durations of disease instead decreased (rather than increased) total anti-S IgG levels. They had a higher virus neutralizing capacity compared to non-carriers. Conversely, analyses also identified HLA alleles (HLA class II DQB1*03:02 und HLA class I B*15:01) not associated with such benefit in the patient cohort of this study. Hierarchical testing by Cox regression analyses confirmed the significance of the protective effect of the HLA alleles identified (when assessed in composite) in terms of disease duration, whereas AB0 blood group antigen heterozygosity was found to be significantly associated with disease severity (rather than duration) in our cohort. A suggestive association of a heterozygous CCR5 delta 32 mutation status with prolonged disease duration was implied by univariate analyses but could not be confirmed by hierarchical multivariate testing. CONCLUSION: The current study shows that the presence of HLA class II DRB1*01:01 and HLA class I B*35:01 is of even stronger association with reduced disease duration in mild and moderate COVID-19 than age or any other potential risk factor assessed. Prospective studies in larger patient populations also including novel SARS-CoV-2 variants will be required to assess the impact of HLA genetics on the capacity of mounting protective vaccination responses in the future.


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , COVID-19/etiology , HLA Antigens/genetics , Receptors, CCR5/genetics , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/genetics , Female , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Genotype , HLA-DRB1 Chains/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Morbidity , Mutation , Severity of Illness Index
8.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 87, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344125

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 infection is a major threat to patients and health care providers around the world. One solution is the vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: We performed a comprehensive query of the latest publications on the prevention of viral infections including the recent vaccination program and its side effects. RESULTS: The situation is evolving rapidly and there is no reasonable alternative to population-scale vaccination programs as currently enrolled. CONCLUSION: Therefore, regulatory authorities should consider supplementing their conventional mandate of post-approval pharmacovigilance, which is based on the collection, assessment, and regulatory response to emerging safety findings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Informed Consent/standards , Pharmacovigilance , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccination/standards , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Disclosure , Humans
9.
Eur J Med Res ; 25(1): 32, 2020 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713821

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The German government has made it mandatory to wear respiratory masks covering mouth and nose (MNC) as an effective strategy to fight SARS-CoV-2 infections. In many countries, this directive has been extended on shopping malls or public transportation. The aim of this paper is to critically analyze the statutory regulation to wear protective masks during the COVID-19 crisis from a medical standpoint. METHODS: We performed an extensive query of the most recent publications addressing the prevention of viral infections including the use of face masks in the community as a method to prevent the spread of the infection. We addressed the issues of practicability, professional use, and acceptability based on the community and the environment where the user resided. RESULTS: Upon our critical review of the available literature, we found only weak evidence for wearing a face mask as an efficient hygienic tool to prevent the spread of a viral infection. However, the use of MNC seems to be linked to relevant protection during close contact scenarios by limiting pathogen-containing aerosol and liquid droplet dissemination. Importantly, we found evidence for significant respiratory compromise in patients with severe obstructive pulmonary disease, secondary to the development of hypercapnia. This could also happen in patients with lung infections, with or without SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSION: Epidemiologists currently emphasize that wearing MNC will effectively interrupt airborne infections in the community. The government and the politicians have followed these recommendations and used them to both advise and, in some cases, mandate the general population to wear MNC in public locations. Overall, the results seem to suggest that there are some clinically relevant scenarios where the use of MNC necessitates more defined recommendations. Our critical evaluation of the literature both highlights the protective effects of certain types of face masks in defined risk groups, and emphasizes their potential risks.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Respiratory Protective Devices/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Equipment and Supplies Utilization/legislation & jurisprudence , Equipment and Supplies Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Masks/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/legislation & jurisprudence , Respiratory Protective Devices/adverse effects
10.
Eur J Med Res ; 25(1): 23, 2020 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612270

ABSTRACT

In the human population, social contacts are a key for transmission of bacteria and viruses. The use of face masks seems to be critical to prevent the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 for the period, in which therapeutic interventions are lacking. In this review, we describe the history of masks from the middle age to modern times.


Subject(s)
Communicable Disease Control/methods , History of Medicine , Masks/history , Communicable Disease Control/instrumentation , History, 17th Century , History, 18th Century , History, 19th Century , History, 20th Century , History, 21st Century , Masks/standards , Respiratory Protective Devices/history , Respiratory Protective Devices/standards
11.
Eur J Med Res ; 25(1): 16, 2020 May 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-270845

ABSTRACT

The rapid spread of the corona virus pandemic is an existential problem for many people in numerous countries. So far, there is no effective vaccine protection or proven therapy available against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. In this review, we describe the role of passive immunization in times of the corona virus. Passive immunization could be a bridging technology to improve the immune defense of critically ill patients until better approaches with effective medications are available.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Immunization, Passive , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Humans , Immunization, Passive/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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