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1.
Cell ; 185(14): 2452-2468.e16, 2022 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885669

ABSTRACT

COVID survivors frequently experience lingering neurological symptoms that resemble cancer-therapy-related cognitive impairment, a syndrome for which white matter microglial reactivity and consequent neural dysregulation is central. Here, we explored the neurobiological effects of respiratory SARS-CoV-2 infection and found white-matter-selective microglial reactivity in mice and humans. Following mild respiratory COVID in mice, persistently impaired hippocampal neurogenesis, decreased oligodendrocytes, and myelin loss were evident together with elevated CSF cytokines/chemokines including CCL11. Systemic CCL11 administration specifically caused hippocampal microglial reactivity and impaired neurogenesis. Concordantly, humans with lasting cognitive symptoms post-COVID exhibit elevated CCL11 levels. Compared with SARS-CoV-2, mild respiratory influenza in mice caused similar patterns of white-matter-selective microglial reactivity, oligodendrocyte loss, impaired neurogenesis, and elevated CCL11 at early time points, but after influenza, only elevated CCL11 and hippocampal pathology persisted. These findings illustrate similar neuropathophysiology after cancer therapy and respiratory SARS-CoV-2 infection which may contribute to cognitive impairment following even mild COVID.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Neoplasms , Animals , Humans , Influenza, Human/pathology , Mice , Microglia/pathology , Myelin Sheath , Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Cell ; 181(7): 1445-1449, 2020 06 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-597479

ABSTRACT

The COVID19 crisis has magnified the issues plaguing academic science, but it has also provided the scientific establishment with an unprecedented opportunity to reset. Shoring up the foundation of academic science will require a concerted effort between funding agencies, universities, and the public to rethink how we support scientists, with a special emphasis on early career researchers.


Subject(s)
Career Mobility , Research Personnel/trends , Research/trends , Achievement , Biomedical Research , Humans , Research Personnel/education , Science/education , Science/trends , Universities
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