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1.
Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 33(1S Suppl 1): e368-e374, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764695

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIMS: In this meta-analysis, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of fibrosis-4 index (FIB-4) in COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases on 26 November 2020. FIB-4 was calculated by [age (years) × AST (IU/L)]/[platelet count (109/L) × âˆšALT (U/L)]. A value above cutoff point was considered high and a value below cutoff point was considered low. The main outcome was mortality, the association between high FIB-4 and mortality was reported in odds ratio (OR). Sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), diagnostic OR (DOR), area under the curve (AUC) were generated. RESULTS: There were 963 patients from five studies included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed that high FIB-4 was associated with increased mortality [OR 3.96 (2.16-7.27), P < 0.001; I2: 41.3%]. High FIB-4 was associated mortality with a sensitivity of 0.56 (0.40-0.70), specificity of 0.80 (0.72-0.86), PLR 2.8 (1.8-4.2), NLR 0.55 (0.39-0.78), DOR 5 (2-10), and AUC of 0.77 (0.73-0.81). Fagan's nomogram indicated that for a pre-test probability (mortality) of 30%, a high FIB-4 was associated with 54% post-test probability and a low FIB-4 was associated with 19%, respectively. The funnel-plot analysis was asymmetrical, trim-and-fill analysis by imputation of a study on the left side using linear estimator resulted in an OR of 3.48 (1.97-6.14). Egger's test showed no indication of small-study effects (P = 0.881). CONCLUSION: High FIB-4 was associated with mortality in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Area Under Curve , Fibrosis , Humans , Platelet Count , SARS-CoV-2
2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-329184

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global pandemic. Coagulopathy is one of the most common complications characterized by increased D-dimer level. We aimed to investigate the dose-response relationship between elevated D-dimer level and mortality in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Methods: This was a retrospective observational study in 259 critically ill COVID-19 patients requiring intensive care unit admission between March and December 2020. We compared the mortality rate between patients with and without elevated D-dimer. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, Fagan’s nomogram, and dose-response relationship were performed to determine the association between D-dimer level and mortality. Results: Overall mortality rate was 40.9% (106 patients). Median D-dimer level was higher in non-survivor group (10,170 ng/mL vs 4,050 ng/mL, p=0.028). The association remained significant after multivariate logistic regression analysis (p=0.046). The optimal cut-off for D-dimer level to predict mortality from ROC curve analysis was 9,020 ng/mL (OR (odds ratio) 3.73 [95% CI (confidence interval) 1.91 – 7.28], p<0.001). D-dimer level >9,020 ng/mL confers 67% posterior probability of mortality and D-dimer level <9,020 ng/mL had 35% probability of mortality. Conclusions: There was a non-linear dose-response relationship between D-dimer level and mortality with P nonlinearity of 0.004. D-dimer level was associated with mortality in critically ill COVID-19 patients in the non-linear dose-response relationship.

3.
Frontiers in medicine ; 8, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1602420

ABSTRACT

Objective: This meta-analysis aims to assess whether elevated De Ritis ratio is associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, and EuropePMC databases up until September 17, 2021. De Ritis ratio is also known as Aspartate aminotransferase/alanine transaminase (AST/ALT) ratio. The main outcome was poor prognosis, a composite of mortality, severity, the need for ICU care, and intubation. The effect measure was odds ratios (ORs) and mean differences. We generated sensitivity and specificity, negative and positive likelihood ratio (NLR and PLR), diagnostic odds ratio (DOR), and area under curve (AUC). Results: There were eight studies with 4,606 patients. De Ritis ratio was elevated in 44% of the patients. Patients with poor prognosis have higher De Ritis ratio [mean difference 0.41 (0.31, 0.50), p < 0.001;I2: 81.0%] and subgroup analysis showed that non-survivors also have higher De Ritis Ratio [mean difference 0.47 (0.46, 0.48), p < 0.001;I2: 0%]. Elevated De Ritis ratio was associated with poor prognosis [OR 3.28 (2.39, 4.52), p < 0.001;I2: 35.8%]. It has a sensitivity of 55% (36–73), specificity of 71% (52–85), PLR 1.9, NLR.63, DOR of 3 (2–4), and AUC of.67 (0.63–0.71). The posterior probability of poor prognosis was 38% if De Ritis is elevated, while 17% if De Ritis is not elevated. Conclusion: Elevated De Ritis ratio is associated with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19. Systematic Review Registration: PROSPERO ID: CRD42020216634.

4.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 6-12, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351688

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study aimed to investigate whether the active prescription of low-dose aspirin during or prior to hospitalization affects mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Aspirin is often prescribed for secondary prevention in patients with cardiovascular disease and other comorbidities that might increase mortality, and may therefore falsely demonstrate increased mortality. To reduce bias, only studies that performed an adjusted analysis were included in this review. METHODS: A systematic literature search of PubMed, Scopus, Embase and Clinicaltrials.gov was performed, from inception until 16 April 2021. The exposure was active prescription of low-dose aspirin during or prior to hospitalization. The primary outcome was mortality. The pooled adjusted effect estimate was reported as relative risk (RR). RESULTS: Six eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 13,993 patients. The studies had low-to-moderate risk of bias based on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. The meta-analysis indicated that the use of low-dose aspirin was independently associated with reduced mortality {RR 0.46 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35-0.61], P < 0.001; I2 = 36.2%}. Subgroup analysis on in-hospital low-dose aspirin administration also showed a significant reduction in mortality [RR 0.39 (95% CI 0.16-0.96), P < 0.001; I2 = 47.0%]. CONCLUSION: Use of low-dose aspirin is independently associated with reduced mortality in patients with COVID-19, with low certainty of evidence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aspirin/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Humans , Prescriptions , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Postgrad Med J ; 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1292178

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Statin potentially improved outcome in patients with COVID-19. Patients who receive statin generally have a higher proportion of comorbidities than those who did not, which may introduce bias. In this meta-analysis, we aimed to investigate the association between statin use and mortality in patients with COVID-19 by pooling the adjusted effect estimates from propensity-score matching (PSM) matched studies or randomised controlled trials to reduce bias. METHODS: A systematic literature search using the PubMed, Scopus and Embase databases were performed up until 1 March 2021. Studies that were designed the study to assess statin and mortality using PSM with the addition of Inverse Probability Treatment Weighting or multivariable regression analysis on top of PSM-matched cohorts were included. The effect estimate was reported in term of relative risk (RR). RESULTS: 14 446 patients were included in the eight PSM-matched studies. Statin was associated with decreased mortality in patients with COVID-19 (RR 0.72 (0.55, 0.95), p=0.018; I2: 84.3%, p<0.001). Subgroup analysis in patients receiving statin in-hospital showed that it was associated with lower mortality (RR 0.71 (0.54, 0.94), p=0.030; I2: 64.1%, p<0.025). The association of statin and mortality was not significantly affected by age (coefficient: -0.04, p=0.382), male gender (RR 0.96 (0.95, 1.02), p=0.456), diabetes (RR 1.02 (0.99, 1.04), p=0.271) and hypertension (RR 1.01 (0.97, 1.04), p=0.732) in this pooled analysis. CONCLUSION: In this meta-analysis of PSM-matched cohorts with adjusted analysis, statin was shown to decrease the risk of mortality in patients with COVID-19. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42021240137.

6.
Int J Infect Dis ; 117: 267-273, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the levels of von Willebrand Factor (vWF) antigen in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with a poor outcome compared with those with a good outcome, and explored factors that may affect the difference in terms of vWF antigen between the two groups. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase and Scopus databases was undertaken from inception until 7 April 2021. The primary outcome was poor outcome, which is a composite of mortality and severity of COVID-19. RESULTS: Ten studies including a total of 996 patients were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. vWF antigen was higher in patients with poor outcomes [standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.84 [0.45-1.23], P<0.001; I2=87.3, P<0.001). For subgroup analysis on studies that reported the vWF antigen level as a percentage, the mean difference was 121.6 [(53.7-189.4), P<0.001; I2=92.0, P<0.001]. Meta-regression showed that the SMD between poor outcome and good outcome was affected by the platelet count (coefficient 0.0061, P=0.001), d-dimer level (coefficient 0.0007, P=0.026) and factor VIII level (coefficient 0.0057, P=0.031), but not by age (coefficient -0.0610, P=0.440), gender (coefficient 0.0135, P=0.698), obesity (coefficient 0.0282, P=0.666), hypertension (coefficient 0.0273, P=0.423), diabetes (coefficient 0.0317, P=0.398) or malignancy (coefficient 0.0487, P=0.608). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis showed that the level of vWF antigen was significantly higher in patients with COVID-19 with a poor outcome, signalling marked endotheliopathy. Meta-regression showed that the differences became larger as the platelet count, d-dimer level and factor VIII level increased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , von Willebrand Factor , Humans
8.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 96: 107723, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201210

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This systematic review, with meta-analysis and meta-regression aims to evaluate the effect of colchicine administration on mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and factors affecting the association. METHODS: A systematic literature search using the PubMed, Scopus, and Embase databases were performed from inception of databases up until 3 March 2021. We included studies that fulfill all of the following criteria: 1) observational studies or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that report COVID-19 patients, 2) reporting colchicine use, and 3) mortality within 30 days. There was no restriction on the age, inpatients or outpatients setting, and severity of diseases. The intervention was colchicine administration during treatment for COVID-19. The control was receiving placebo or standard of care. The outcome was mortality and the pooled effect estimate was reported as odds ratio (OR). Random-effects restricted maximum likelihood meta-regression was performed to evaluate factors affecting the pooled effect estimate. RESULTS: Eight studies comprising of 5530 patients were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. There were three RCTs and five observational studies. Pooled analysis showed that colchicine was associated with lower mortality in patients with COVID-19 (OR 0.47 [0.31, 0.72], p = 0.001; I2: 30.9, p = 0.181). Meta-regression analysis showed that the association between colchicine and mortality was reduced by increasing age (OR 0.92 [0.85, 1.00], p = 0.05), but not gender (reference: male, p = 0.999), diabetes (p = 0.376), hypertension (p = 0.133), and CAD (p = 0.354). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis indicates that colchicine may reduce mortality in patients with COVID-19. Meta-regression analysis showed that the benefit was reduced as age increases. PROSPERO: CRD42021240609.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Colchicine/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Age Factors , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Gender Identity , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Male , Mortality , Odds Ratio , Regression Analysis
9.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 43: 163-168, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174154

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Body mass index (BMI) has previously been shown to increase mortality and disease severity in patients with COVID-19, but the pooled effect estimate was heterogeneous. Although BMI is widely used as an indicator, it cannot distinguish visceral from subcutaneous fat. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to investigate the association between visceral adiposity, subcutaneous fat, and severe COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search using the databases: PubMed, Embase, and EuropePMC. Data on visceral fat area (VTA), subcutaneous fat area (SFA), and total fat area (TFA) were collected. The outcome of interest was severe COVID-19. We used a REML random-effects model to pool the mean differences and odds ratio (OR). RESULTS: There were 5 studies comprising of 539 patients. Patients with severe COVID-19 have a higher VTA (mean difference 41.7 cm2 [27.0, 56.4], p < 0.001; I2: 0%) and TFA (mean difference 64.6 cm2 [26.2, 103.1], p = 0.001; I2: 0%). There was no significant difference in terms of SFA between patients with severe and non-severe COVID-19 (mean difference 9.3 cm2 [-4.9, 23.4], p = 0.199; I2: 1.2%). Pooled ORs showed that VTA was associated with severe COVID-19 (OR 1.9 [1.1, 2.2], p = 0.002; I2: 49.3%). CONCLUSION: Visceral adiposity was associated with increased COVID-19 severity, while subcutaneous adiposity was not. PROSPERO ID: CRD42020215876.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/metabolism , Intra-Abdominal Fat/metabolism , Obesity/metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Subcutaneous Fat/metabolism , Adiposity , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity, Abdominal/complications , Obesity, Abdominal/epidemiology , Obesity, Abdominal/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Pharmacol Rep ; 73(6): 1642-1649, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174060

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The negative impacts of proton pump inhibitor (PPI), including the risk of pneumonia and mortality, have been reported previously. This meta-analysis aimed to address the current interest of whether the administration of PPI could increase the susceptibility and risk of poor outcome in COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search from PubMed, Embase, EBSCOhost, and EuropePMC databases up until 3 December 2020. The main outcome was composite poor outcome which comprised of mortality and severe COVID-19. Severe COVID-19 in this study was defined as patients with COVID-19 that fulfill the criteria for severe CAP, including the need for intensive unit care or mechanical ventilation. The secondary outcome was susceptibility, based on cohort comparing COVID-19 positive and COVID-19 negative participants. RESULTS: There were a total of 290,455 patients from 12 studies in this meta-analysis. PPI use was associated with increased composite poor outcome (OR 1.85 [1.13, 3.03], p = 0.014; I2 90.26%). Meta-regression analysis indicate that the association does not vary by age (OR 0.97 [0.92, 1.02], p = 0.244), male (OR 1.05 [0.99, 1.11], p = 0.091), hypertension (OR 9.98 [0.95, 1.02], p = 0.317), diabetes (OR 0.99 [0.93, 1.05], p = 0.699), chronic kidney disease (OR 1.01 [0.93, 1.10], p = 0.756), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use (OR 1.02 [0.96, 1.09], p = 0.499), and pre-admission/in-hospital PPI use (OR 0.77 [0.26, 2.31], p = 0.644). PPI use was not associated with the susceptibility to COVID-19 (OR 1.56 [0.48, 5.05], p = 0.46; I2 99.7%). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis showed a potential association between PPI use and composite poor outcome, but not susceptibility. PROSPERO ID: CRD42020224286.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Proton Pump Inhibitors/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Hypertension , Male , Middle Aged , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(3): 777-782, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163663

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: This study aims to synthesize evidence on dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor and mortality in COVID-19 patients and factors affecting it. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search from PubMed, Scopus, and Embase databases from inception of databases up until 7 March 2021. Studies that met all of the following criteria were included: 1) observational studies or randomized controlled trials that report COVID-19 patients, 2) reporting DPP-4 inhibitor use, 3) mortality, and 4) mortality based on DPP-4 inhibitor use. The exposure was DPP-4 inhibitor, defined as DPP-4 inhibitor use that started prior to COVID-19 hospitalization. The control group was patients with no exposure to DPP-4 inhibitor. The outcome was mortality. The pooled effect estimate was reported as risk ratio (RR). RESULTS: There were 4,477 patients from 9 studies in this systematic review and meta-analysis. 31% of (15%, 46%) the patients use DPP-4 inhibitor. Mortality occurs in 23% (15%, 31%) of the patients. DPP-4 inhibitor was associated with lower mortality in patients with COVID-19 (RR 0.76 [0.60, 0.97], p = 0.030, I2: 44.5%, p = 0.072). Meta-regression analysis showed that the association between DPP-4 inhibitor and mortality was significantly affected by metformin (RR 1.02 [1.00, 1.04], p = 0.048) and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) use (RR 1.04 [1.01, 1.07], p = 0.006), but not age (p = 0.759), sex (reference: male, p = 0.148), and hypertension (p = 0.218). CONCLUSION: DPP-4 inhibitor use was associated with lower mortality in COVID-19 patients, and the association was weaker in patients who were also taking metformin and/or ACE inhibitors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Dipeptidyl-Peptidase IV Inhibitors/pharmacology , Female , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Metformin/therapeutic use , Mortality , Regression Analysis , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
12.
Clin Med Insights Endocrinol Diabetes ; 14: 1179551421990675, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159012

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate whether dyslipidemia affects the mortality and severity of COVID-19, we also aimed to evaluate whether other comorbidities influence the association. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed, Embase, and EuropePMC was performed on 8 October 2020. This study's main outcome is a poor composite outcome, comprising of mortality and severe COVID-19. RESULTS: There were 9 studies with 3663 patients. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in this pooled analysis was 18% (4%-32%). Dyslipidemia was associated with increased composite poor outcome (RR 1.39 [1.02, 1.88], P = .010; I 2: 56.7%, P = .018). Subgroup analysis showed that dyslipidemia was associated with severe COVID-19 (RR 1.39 [1.03, 1.87], P = .008; I 2: 57.4%, P = .029). Meta-regression showed that the association between dyslipidemia and poor outcome varies by age (coefficient: -0.04, P = .033), male gender (coefficient: -0.03, P = .042), and hypertension (coefficient: -0.02, P = .033), but not diabetes (coefficient: -0.24, P = .135) and cardiovascular diseases (coefficient: -0.01, P = .506). Inverted funnel-plot was relatively symmetrical. Egger's test indicates that the pooled analysis was not statistically significant for small-study effects (P = .206). CONCLUSION: Dyslipidemia potentially increases mortality and severity of COVID-19. The association was stronger in patients with older age, male, and hypertension.PROSPERO Registration Number: CRD42020213491.

13.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(2): 529-534, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131232

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Creatine kinase (CK), a marker of muscle damage, is potentially associated with a more severe COVID-19. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we aim to evaluate the association between the elevated CK and severity and mortality in COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search on PubMed, Scopus, and Embase up until January 26, 2020. The main outcome was poor outcome, a composite of mortality and severe COVID-19. RESULTS: There are 2471 patients from 14 studies included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The incidence of elevated CK in this pooled analysis was 17% (11%, 22%) and the incidence of poor outcome in this pooled analysis was 27% (19%, 34%). Elevated CK was associated with poor outcome in patients with COVID-19 (OR 3.01 [2.21, 4.10], p < 0.001; I2: 10.2%). The effect estimate did not vary with age (p = 0.610), male (p = 0.449), hypertension (p = 0.490), and diabetes (p = 0.457). Elevated CK has a sensitivity of 0.24 (0.17, 0.32), specificity of 0.91 (0.86, 0.94), PLR of 2.6 (1.9, 3.7), NLR of 0.84 (0.78, 0.90), DOR of 3 (2, 5), and AUC of 0.62 (0.57, 0.66) for predicting poor outcome in patients with COVID-19. In this pooled analysis, elevated CK confers to a 49% probability for poor outcome and a non-elevated CK confers to a 24% probability. Subgroup analysis and univariate meta-regression indicates that the sensitivity and specificity does not vary with age, male, hypertension, and diabetes. CONCLUSION: Elevated CK was associated with increased mortality and severity in patients with COVID-19. PROSPERO: CRD42021233435.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Creatine Kinase/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr ; 95: 104388, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122855

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Older adults are indisputably struck hard by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The main objective of this meta-analysis is to establish the association between delirium and mortality in older adults with COVID-19. METHODS: Systematic literature searches of PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases were performed up until 28 November 2020. The exposure in this study was the diagnosis of delirium using clinically validated criteria. Delirium might be in-hospital, at admission, or both. The main outcome was mortality defined as clinically validated non-survivor/death. The effect estimates were reported as odds ratios (ORs) and adjusted odds ratios (aORs). RESULTS: A total of 3,868 patients from 9 studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The percentage of patients with delirium was 27% [20%, 34%]. Every 1 mg/L increase in CRP was significantly associated with 1% increased delirium risk (OR 1.01 [1.00. 1.02], p=0.033). Delirium was associated with mortality (OR 2.39 [1.64, 3.49], p<0.001; I2: 82.88%). Subgroup analysis on delirium assessed at admission indicate independent association (OR 2.12 [1.39, 3.25], p<0.001; I2: 82.67%). Pooled adjusted analysis indicated that delirium was independently associated with mortality (aOR 1.50 [1.16, 1.94], p=0.002; I2: 31.02%). Subgroup analysis on delirium assessed at admission indicate independent association (OR 1.40 [1.03, 1.90], p=0.030; I2: 35.19%). Meta-regression indicates that the association between delirium and mortality were not significantly influenced by study-level variations in age, sex [reference: male], hypertension, diabetes, and dementia. CONCLUSION: The presence of delirium is associated with increased risk of mortality in hospitalized older adults with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delirium , Hypertension , Aged , Delirium/diagnosis , Delirium/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Geriatr Orthop Surg Rehabil ; 12: 2151459321992746, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102319
16.
J Clin Exp Hepatol ; 2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080600

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate whether dyslipidemia affects the mortality and severity of COVID-19, we also aimed to evaluate whether other comorbidities influence the association. METHODS: A systematic literature search using PubMed, Embase, and EuropePMC was performed on 8 October 2020. This study's main outcome is a poor composite outcome, comprising of mortality and severe COVID-19. RESULTS: There were 9 studies with 3,663 patients. The prevalence of dyslipidemia in this pooled analysis was 18% (4%-32%). Dyslipidemia was associated with increased composite poor outcome (RR 1.39 [1.02, 1.88], p=0.010; I2: 56.7%, p=0.018). Subgroup analysis showed that dyslipidemia was associated with severe COVID-19 (RR 1.39 [1.03, 1.87], p=0.008; I2: 57.4%, p=0.029). Meta-regression showed that the association between dyslipidemia and poor outcome varies by age (coefficient: -0.04, p=0.033), male gender (coefficient: -0.03, p=0.042), and hypertension (coefficient: -0.02, p=0.033), but not diabetes (coefficient: -0.24, p=0.135) and cardiovascular diseases (coefficient: -0.01, p=0.506). Inverted funnel-plot was relatively symmetrical. Egger's test indicates that the pooled analysis was not statistically significant for small-study effects (p=0.206). CONCLUSION: Dyslipidemia potentially increases mortality and severity of COVID-19. The association was stronger in patients with older age, male, and hypertension. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020213491.

17.
Int J Infect Dis ; 105: 351-356, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077931

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we assessed the association between tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) measured by echocardiography and mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search using PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases with the keywords "COVID-19" OR "SARS-CoV-2" OR "2019-nCoV" AND "Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion" OR "TAPSE" until January 20, 2021. The main outcome was mortality. The effect estimate was reported as the hazard ratio (HR), which was pooled from the unadjusted and adjusted effect estimates retrieved from the studies included. Mean differences in TAPSE (in mm) between non-survivors and survivors were pooled. RESULTS: In total, 641 patients from seven studies were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. TAPSE was lower in non-survivors compared with survivors (mean difference = -3.74 [-5.22, -2.26], p < 0.001; I2: 85.5%, p < 0.001). Each 1 mm decrease in TAPSE was associated with increased mortality (HR = 1.24 [1.18, 1.31], p < 0.001; I2: 0.0%, p = 0.491). In the pooled adjusted model, each 1 mm decrease in TAPSE was associated with increased mortality (HR = 1.21 [1.11, 1.33], p < 0.001; I2: 45.1%, p = 0.156). Meta-regression indicated that the difference in TAPSE between non-survivors and survivors was affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (-0.183, p < 0.001) and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (-0.344, p = 0.039), but not by age (p = 0.668), male gender (p = 0.821), hypertension (p = 0.101), diabetes (p = 0.603), coronary artery disease (p = 0.564), smoking (p = 0.140), and left ventricular ejection fraction (p = 0.452). CONCLUSION: Every 1 mm decrease in TAPSE was associated with an increase in mortality of approximately 20%. PROSPERO ID: CRD42021232194.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Echocardiography/methods , Tricuspid Valve/diagnostic imaging , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/diagnostic imaging , Aged , Blood Pressure , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke Volume , Tricuspid Valve/physiopathology , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/mortality , Ventricular Dysfunction, Right/physiopathology , Ventricular Function, Left , Ventricular Function, Right
18.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e40, 2021 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1053941

ABSTRACT

This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate thrombocytopenia as a prognostic biomarker in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We performed a systematic literature search using PubMed, Embase and EuropePMC. The main outcome was composite poor outcome, a composite of mortality, severity, need for intensive care unit care and invasive mechanical ventilation. There were 8963 patients from 23 studies. Thrombocytopenia occurred in 18% of the patients. Male gender (P = 0.037) significantly reduce the incidence. Thrombocytopenia was associated with composite poor outcome (RR 1.90 (1.43-2.52), P < 0.001; I2: 92.3%). Subgroup analysis showed that thrombocytopenia was associated with mortality (RR 2.34 (1.23-4.45), P < 0.001; I2: 96.8%) and severity (RR 1.61 (1.33-1.96), P < 0.001; I2: 62.4%). Subgroup analysis for cut-off <100 × 109/l showed RR of 1.93 (1.37-2.72), P < 0.001; I2: 83.2%). Thrombocytopenia had a sensitivity of 0.26 (0.18-0.36), specificity of 0.89 (0.84-0.92), positive likelihood ratio of 2.3 (1.6-3.2), negative likelihood ratio of 0.83 (0.75-0.93), diagnostic odds ratio of 3 (2, 4) and area under curve of 0.70 (0.66-0.74) for composite poor outcome. Meta-regression analysis showed that the association between thrombocytopenia and poor outcome did not vary significantly with age, male, lymphocyte, d-dimer, hypertension, diabetes and CKD. Fagan's nomogram showed that the posterior probability of poor outcome was 50% in patients with thrombocytopenia, and 26% in those without thrombocytopenia. The Deek's funnel plot was relatively symmetrical and the quantitative asymmetry test was non-significant (P = 0.14). This study indicates that thrombocytopenia was associated with poor outcome in patients with COVID-19.PROSPERO ID: CRD42020213974.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/mortality , Thrombocytopenia/pathology
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J Clin Orthop Trauma ; 16: 16-23, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002736

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed evaluate the 30-day mortality, number and site of fracture, mechanism of injury, and location where injury was sustained during the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search from PubMed and Embase on original articles, research letters, and short reports which have data about the number of fractures, site of fracture, mechanism of injury, location where injury was sustained, percentage of operative intervention, mortality during the pandemic compared to a specified period of time before the pandemic. The search was finalized in October 14, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 11,936 participants from 16 studies were included in our study. The pooled analysis indicated a higher 30-days mortality associated with fractures during the pandemic (9% vs 4%, OR 1.86 [1.05, 3.27], p = 0.03; I2: 36%, p = 0.15). The number of fractures presenting to hospitals has declined 43% (35-50%) compared to pre-pandemic. Hand fracture was fewer during the pandemic (18% vs 23%, OR 0.75 [0.58, 0.97], p = 0.03; I2: 69%, p = 0.002). Work-related traumas, high-energy falls, and domestic accidents were more common during the pandemic, while sports-related traumas were found to be less. Injuries that occurred in the sports area were lower than before the pandemic. CONCLUSION: The present meta-analysis showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the number of fractures has decreased, but there is a higher mortality rate associated with fractures.

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