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1.
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation ; 103(12):e171-e172, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2130018

ABSTRACT

To investigate across sex (i.e., biological attributes) and gender (i.e., roles and responsibilities), the support services and workplace accommodation needs for men and women with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the impact of COVID-19 on work and mental well-being. A cross-sectional study design with an online survey. Descriptive and regression analyses were completed for sex and gender differences. Open-ended responses were analyzed through a content analysis approach. Research Electronic Data Capture application of a research teaching hospital in Ontario, Canada. Adult persons with TBI were recruited nationally. Not applicable. Differences between men and women in domains of quality of life after brain injury-overall scale (QOLIBRI-OS), health support service needs, workplace accommodations, and change in employment status and mental health due to COVID-19. Thirty-two persons with TBI (62% women;38% men) completed the study. The most needed services by women and men were physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and counselling services. The most needed workplace accommodations for men and women were modified hours/days and modified/different duties. Women expressed needing help with housekeeping and caregiving to transition to work effectively. Women also scored poorer on the daily activity domain of the QOLIBRI-OS. Women were more likely to experience no change in employment status because of COVID-19, whereas men expressed concern over job security and finances. Mental well-being was a concern for both men and women. Results revealed noteworthy differences between men and women's needs post-TBI, including during the pandemic. Rehabilitation professionals can better support men and women with TBI through awareness of their specific workplace accommodation needs. No conflict to disclose.

2.
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation ; 103(12):e171-e172, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2130017

ABSTRACT

Research Objectives To investigate across sex (i.e., biological attributes) and gender (i.e., roles and responsibilities), the support services and workplace accommodation needs for men and women with traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the impact of COVID-19 on work and mental well-being. Design A cross-sectional study design with an online survey. Descriptive and regression analyses were completed for sex and gender differences. Open-ended responses were analyzed through a content analysis approach. Setting Research Electronic Data Capture application of a research teaching hospital in Ontario, Canada. Participants Adult persons with TBI were recruited nationally. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Differences between men and women in domains of quality of life after brain injury-overall scale (QOLIBRI-OS), health support service needs, workplace accommodations, and change in employment status and mental health due to COVID-19. Results Thirty-two persons with TBI (62% women;38% men) completed the study. The most needed services by women and men were physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and counselling services. The most needed workplace accommodations for men and women were modified hours/days and modified/different duties. Women expressed needing help with housekeeping and caregiving to transition to work effectively. Women also scored poorer on the daily activity domain of the QOLIBRI-OS. Women were more likely to experience no change in employment status because of COVID-19, whereas men expressed concern over job security and finances. Mental well-being was a concern for both men and women. Conclusions Results revealed noteworthy differences between men and women's needs post-TBI, including during the pandemic. Rehabilitation professionals can better support men and women with TBI through awareness of their specific workplace accommodation needs. Author(s) Disclosures No conflict to disclose.

3.
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation ; 103(12):e206-e206, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2129960

ABSTRACT

To examine the impact and implications of workplace accommodations during the COVID-19 pandemic for people with disabilities. Systematic searches were conducted from the following Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Applied Social Sciences Index and s, Sociological s and Google Scholar. The following inclusion criteria were applied: (i) article published or early online in a peer-reviewed journal from 2019 to 2021 (without language restrictions), and explicitly addressing both (ii) workplace accommodations, adjustments, or modifications during the pandemic and (iii) the impact or implications for people with disabilities. Two reviewers screened all s. Articles were selected by two reviewers, and data was ed in accordance with scoping review methodology. Thirty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were analyzed following the guidance for thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: (1) positive impacts of pandemic-related workplace accommodations on people with disabilities (e.g., improved accessibility, reduced stigma around workplace accommodations, rapid implementation of workplace accommodation, opportunities for advocacy);(2) negative impacts (e.g., worsened physical and mental health, new accommodation needs);and (3) action needed and recommendations (e.g., revisit legislation and policy on accommodations, ensure representation of people with disabilities). This review identified a mixed assessment of the impacts of workplace accommodations during the pandemic on people with disabilities. However, there was a broad consensus regarding the importance of learning from the experiences of the pandemic and taking action to improve accommodation policies in the future. Further empirical research on the workplace accommodation experiences of employees with disabilities during the pandemic is needed. None.

4.
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation ; 103(12):e206, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2129959

ABSTRACT

Objective(s) To examine the impact and implications of workplace accommodations during the COVID-19 pandemic for people with disabilities. Data Sources Systematic searches were conducted from the following Data Sources Medline, PsycINFO, Scopus, Applied Social Sciences Index and s, Sociological s and Google Scholar. Study Selection The following inclusion criteria were applied: (i) article published or early online in a peer-reviewed journal from 2019 to 2021 (without language restrictions), and explicitly addressing both (ii) workplace accommodations, adjustments, or modifications during the pandemic and (iii) the impact or implications for people with disabilities. Two reviewers screened all s. Data Extraction Articles were selected by two reviewers, and data was ed in accordance with scoping review methodology. Data Synthesis Thirty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies were analyzed following the guidance for thematic analysis. Three main themes were identified: (1) positive impacts of pandemic-related workplace accommodations on people with disabilities (e.g., improved accessibility, reduced stigma around workplace accommodations, rapid implementation of workplace accommodation, opportunities for advocacy);(2) negative impacts (e.g., worsened physical and mental health, new accommodation needs);and (3) action needed and recommendations (e.g., revisit legislation and policy on accommodations, ensure representation of people with disabilities). Conclusions This review identified a mixed assessment of the impacts of workplace accommodations during the pandemic on people with disabilities. However, there was a broad consensus regarding the importance of learning from the experiences of the pandemic and taking action to improve accommodation policies in the future. Further empirical research on the workplace accommodation experiences of employees with disabilities during the pandemic is needed. Author(s) Disclosures None.

5.
Work ; 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099077

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to widespread changes in the way people work. Some of these changes represent the same kinds of work modifications or adjustments that have often been requested as workplace accommodations, and which may improve labour market and employment outcomes for people with disabilities. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this scoping review was to examine the literature on workplace accommodations in the pandemic and their impacts and implications for people with disabilities. METHODS: Following a search of six international databases, articles were selected by two reviewers, and data were abstracted in accordance with scoping review methodology. A thematic analysis was used to report the relevant findings. RESULTS: Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria, and three main themes were identified: positive impacts of pandemic-related workplace accommodations on people with disabilities (e.g., improved accessibility, reduced stigma around workplace accommodations, rapid implementation of workplace accommodations, opportunities for advocacy); negative impacts (e.g., worsened physical and mental health, new accommodation needs); and action needed and recommendations (e.g., revisit legislation and policy on accommodations, ensure representation of people with disabilities). Overall, our review identified a mixed assessment of the impacts of pandemic-related accommodations on people with disabilities. However, there was a broader consensus regarding the importance of learning from the experiences of the pandemic to improve workplace accommodation policies in the future. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic may present opportunities for improving workplace accommodation policies, but our review also highlights the need for more research examining how workplace changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic have impacted people with disabilities.

6.
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation ; 103(3):e11-e12, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1704257

ABSTRACT

To explore barriers to school and work transitions for youth with and without a disability during the COVID-19 pandemic. An interpretive descriptive qualitative approach involving in-depth interviews. Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada which was considered a hot zone for COVID-19 cases and deaths. A purposive sample of 35 youth (18 with a disability;17 without), aged 16-29 (mean age 23). Not applicable. Semi-structured interviews with participants. Our findings revealed several similarities and some differences between youth with and without disabilities regarding barriers to school and work transitions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Key themes related to these barriers involved: (1) difficult transition to online school and working from home (i.e., expense of setting up home office, technical challenges, impact on mental health), (2) uncertainty about employment (i.e., under-employment, difficult working conditions, difficulty finding work, disability-related challenges) and (3) missed career development opportunities (i.e., cancelled or reduced internships or placements, lack of volunteer opportunities, uncertainties about career pathway, longer-term impact of pandemic). Our findings highlight that youth with disabilities may need further support in engaging in meaningful and accessible vocational activities that align with their career pathway. None.

7.
Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation ; 103(3):e12-e12, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1700013

ABSTRACT

To explore how youth and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) cope with stress and anxiety (i.e., normal/typical anxiety) in competitive employment. An interpretative phenomenological approach involving in-depth interviews. Due to the impact of COVID-19, all interviews took place remotely over the phone or through Zoom Communications. Participants were recruited across Canada. A purposive sample of 12 youth and young adults with ASD aged 15-30 who were employed or had work experience participated in this study. Not applicable. Semi-structured interviews with participants. Findings indicated that stress and/or anxiety inducers for participants in the workplace included: challenges with social communication at work, tasks at work, impact of COVID-19 on employment experiences, past trauma/experiences impacting ability to work, and personal experiences with disability disclosure. Participants reported using the following coping strategies to combat work-related stress and/or anxiety: (1) problem-focused (i.e., finding ways to solve issues at hand), (2) emotion-focused (i.e., using strategies to reduce negative feelings and emotions), and/or (3) resilience (i.e., pushing through the situation despite feeling stressed and/or anxious). Participants also identified workplace barriers and facilitators, which may impact future occurrences of stress or anxiety. Uncovering stress and/or anxiety inducers in a workplace setting can help employers be better informed of the potential barriers that are present for employees with ASD, which can lead to better inclusion on the job. The findings from this study have the potential to improve employment outcomes, transition skills, and overall mental health among youth and young adults with ASD in competitive employment. None.

8.
Adolescents ; 1(4):442-460, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1480532

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Youth and young adults are particularly vulnerable to the socio-economic impacts of Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19). The purpose of this study was to explore barriers to school and employment for youth with and without a disability during the pandemic. Methods: This qualitative comparison study involved in-depth interviews with 35 youth and young adults (18 with a disability;17 without), aged 16–29 (mean age 23). An interpretive, thematic analysis of the transcripts was conducted. Results: Our findings revealed several similarities and some differences between youth and young adults with and without disabilities regarding barriers to school and employment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Key themes related to these barriers involved: (1) difficult transition to online school and working from home (i.e., the expense of setting up a home office, technical challenges, impact on mental health), (2) uncertainty about employment (i.e., under-employment, difficult working conditions, difficulty finding work, disability-related challenges) and (3) missed career development opportunities (i.e., canceled or reduced internships or placements, lack of volunteer opportunities, uncertainties about career pathway, the longer-term impact of the pandemic). Conclusion: Our findings highlight that youth and young adults with disabilities may need further support in engaging in meaningful and accessible vocational activities that align with their career pathway.

9.
Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation ; 102(10):e106, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1439860

ABSTRACT

Research Objectives To understand the facilitators for helping youth with and without disabilities to cope and maintain mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Design A descriptive design using in-depth semi-structured qualitative interviews with a narrative thematic analysis. Setting Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada which was considered a hot zone for COVID-19 cases and deaths. Participants A purposive sample of 34 youth (17 with a disability;17 without) aged 16-29 (mean age 23.2). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Interviews with participants Results Our findings revealed several similarities and some differences between youth with and without disabilities regarding facilitators for maintaining mental health during the pandemic. Enablers of coping included: (1) social support, (2) financial support, (3) keeping busy (i.e., having a daily routine, working to keep the mind occupied, volunteering to boost mental health, focusing on school work), and (4) work-life balance (i.e., reduced commute, more time for exercising, going outdoors, cooking, sleeping better, and reflection on life's purpose). Conclusions Our findings highlight how having coping strategies could help youth to deal with pandemic-related stress. Youth with disabilities may need some additional support in accessing resources, exercising and going outdoors to help enhance their coping strategies. Author(s) Disclosures None.

10.
Disabil Health J ; 14(4): 101113, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225197

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) pandemic has greatly impacted people's mental health. Youth with disabilities are at particular risk for the psychological implications of the pandemic. Although much attention has been given to pandemic-related mental health challenges that youth have encountered, little is known about the facilitators for coping with the stresses of the pandemic and how this varies for youth with and without disabilities. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to understand facilitators for helping youth and young adults with and without disabilities to cope and maintain mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This qualitative study involved in-depth interviews with 34 youth and young adults (17 with a disability; 17 without), aged 16-29 (mean age 23.2). A narrative, thematic analysis of the transcripts was performed. RESULTS: Our findings revealed several similarities and some differences between youth and young adults with and without disabilities regarding facilitators for maintaining mental health during the pandemic. Enablers of coping included: (1) social support; (2) financial support, (3) keeping busy (i.e., having a daily routine, working to keep the mind occupied, volunteering to boost mental health, focusing on school work), and (4) work-life balance (i.e., reduced commute, more time for exercising, going outdoors, cooking, sleeping better, and reflection on life's purpose). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight how having coping strategies could help to youth and young adults deal with pandemic-related stress. Youth with disabilities may need some additional support in accessing resources, exercising and going outdoors to help enhance their coping strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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