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1.
Hum Resour Health ; 20(1): 16, 2022 02 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1741945

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To support the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the World Health Organization and its partners developed an interactive virtual learning initiative through which vaccination stakeholders could receive the latest guidance, ask questions, and share their experiences. This initiative, implemented between 9 February 2021 and 15 June 2021, included virtual engagement between technical experts and participants during a 15-session interactive webinar series as well as web and text-messaging discussions in English and French. METHODS: This article uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze survey data collected following each webinar and a post-series survey conducted after the series had concluded. Participant data were tracked for each session, and feedback surveys were conducted after each session to gauge experience quality and content usability. Chi-square tests were used to compare results across professions (health workers, public health practitioners, and others). RESULTS: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity webinar series reached participants in 179 countries or 93% of the WHO Member States; 75% of participants were from low- and middle-income countries. More than 60% of participants reported using the resources provided during the sessions, and 47% reported sharing these resources with colleagues. More than 79% of participants stated that this initiative significantly improved their confidence in preparing for and rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations; an additional 20% stated that the initiative "somewhat" improved their confidence. In the post-series survey, 70% of participants reported that they will "definitely use" the knowledge derived from this learning series in their work; an additional 20% will "probably use" and 9% would "possibly use" this knowledge in their work. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity learning initiative used a digital model of dynamic, interactive learning at scale. The initiative enhanced WHO's ability to disseminate knowledge, provide normative guidance, and share best practices to COVID-19 vaccination stakeholders in real time. This approach allowed WHO to hear the information needs of stakeholders and respond by developing guidance, tools, and training to support COVID-19 vaccine introduction. WHO and its partners can learn from this capacity-building experience and apply best practices for digital interactive learning to other health programs moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Simulation Training , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
Lancet Glob Health ; 10(2): e186-e194, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1721219

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has revealed the vulnerability of immunisation systems worldwide, although the scale of these disruptions has not been described at a global level. This study aims to assess the impact of COVID-19 on routine immunisation using triangulated data from global, country-based, and individual-reported sources obtained during the pandemic period. METHODS: This report synthesised data from 170 countries and territories. Data sources included administered vaccine-dose data from January to December, 2019, and January to December, 2020, WHO regional office reports, and a WHO-led pulse survey administered in April, 2020, and June, 2020. Results were expressed as frequencies and proportions of respondents or reporting countries. Data on vaccine doses administered were weighted by the population of surviving infants per country. FINDINGS: A decline in the number of administered doses of diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus-containing vaccine (DTP3) and first dose of measles-containing vaccine (MCV1) in the first half of 2020 was noted. The lowest number of vaccine doses administered was observed in April, 2020, when 33% fewer DTP3 doses were administered globally, ranging from 9% in the WHO African region to 57% in the South-East Asia region. Recovery of vaccinations began by June, 2020, and continued into late 2020. WHO regional offices reported substantial disruption to routine vaccination sessions in April, 2020, related to interrupted vaccination demand and supply, including reduced availability of the health workforce. Pulse survey analysis revealed that 45 (69%) of 65 countries showed disruption in outreach services compared with 27 (44%) of 62 countries with disrupted fixed-post immunisation services. INTERPRETATION: The marked magnitude and global scale of immunisation disruption evokes the dangers of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks in the future. Trends indicating partial resumption of services highlight the urgent need for ongoing assessment of recovery, catch-up vaccination strategy implementation for vulnerable populations, and ensuring vaccine coverage equity and health system resilience. FUNDING: US Agency for International Development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Immunization Programs/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Vaccine-Preventable Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , World Health Organization
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318170

ABSTRACT

The launch of the Immunization Agenda 2030 (IA2030) comes at an extraordinary and turbulent time in our collective experience. The COVID-19 pandemic erupted into all our lives, stopping dead in their tracks economies, education systems, human connections and many lives -- lives of persons we loved. It has brought vaccines and immunizations back into the spotlight. In a single year we witnessed the emergence of a novel pathogen, the collective sprint to design, develop, evaluate, and manufacture numerous successful vaccines and deliver hundreds of millions of doses worldwide. This is a testament not only to the power, ingenuity and shared responsibility of collaborative science, but of our shared humanity. The acute phase of the pandemic will be controlled and a return to some sort of new normal will be achieved. COVID-19 vaccines are expected to make a major contribution toward that goal, and this remarkable achievement of vaccine science will need to be accompanied by continued political commitment, global economic partnership, and public engagement. At time of writing, the longer-term trajectory of SARS CoV-2 and the vaccine strategies to constrain its impact are still unfolding, yet it is clear that the global vaccine ecosystem, which touches every community of every country around the world is being put to the test.

5.
Bull World Health Organ ; 99(12): 848-848A, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1556097
6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291538

ABSTRACT

Background: To support the introduction of the COVID-19 vaccine, the World Health Organization and its partners developed an interactive virtual learning initiative through which vaccination stakeholders could receive the latest guidance, ask questions, and share their experiences. This initiative, implemented between 9 February 2021 and 15 June 2021, included virtual engagement between technical experts and participants during a 15-session interactive webinar series as well as web and SMS-messaging discussions in English and French. Methods This article uses a mixed-methods approach to analyze survey data collected following each webinar and a post-series survey conducted after the series had concluded. Participant data was tracked for each session and feedback surveys were conducted after each session to gauge experience quality and content usability. Chi-square tests were used to compare results across professions (health workers, public health practitioners, and other). Results The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity webinar series reached participants in 181 countries or 93% of the WHO Member States;78% of participants were from low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). More than 60% of participants reported using the resources provided during the sessions and 47% reported sharing these resources with colleagues. More than 79% of participants stated that this initiative significantly improved their confidence in preparing for and rolling out COVID-19 vaccinations;an additional 20.3% stated that the initiative “somewhat” improved their confidence. In the post-series survey, 70% of participants reported that they will “definitely use” the knowledge derived from this learning series in their work;an additional 19.7% will “probably use” and 8.6% would “possibly use” this knowledge in their work. Conclusion The COVID-19 Vaccination: Building Global Capacity learning initiative used a digital model of dynamic, interactive learning at scale. The initiative enhanced the WHO’s ability to disseminate knowledge, normative guidance, and best practices to COVID-19 vaccination stakeholders in real-time. This approach allowed the WHO to hear the information needs of stakeholders and respond by developing guidance, tools, and trainings to support COVID-19 vaccine introduction. The WHO and its partners can learn from this capacity-building experience and apply best practices for digital interactive learning to other health programmes moving forward.

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