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1.
Arch Dermatol Res ; 314(9): 903-904, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048258
3.
Am J Clin Dermatol ; 23(5): 729-737, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1982398

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Adverse reactions to the COVID-19 vaccines have been of interest since their emergency authorization. Cutaneous manifestations of the vaccines are not well studied. We aimed to characterize cutaneous reactions to the Moderna (mRNA-1273) and the Pfizer-BioNTech (BNT162b2) COVID-19 vaccines on a large, national scale. METHODS: The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System was filtered for cutaneous and hair and nail reactions to the COVID-19 vaccines. Patient demographics and past medical histories, vaccine manufacturer and dosing, symptom timing, reaction location, and patient outcomes were extracted from each report. RESULTS: As of December 24, 2021, there were 67,273 cutaneous reactions to all COVID-19 vaccines, with most patients receiving the Moderna (mRNA-1273) or Pfizer-BioNTech (BNT162b2) vaccines. The most common reactions overall were injection-site reaction, urticaria, and papular rash, with injection-site reaction more common after the Moderna (mRNA-1273) vaccine, and all other cutaneous reactions more common after the Pfizer-BioNTech (BNT162b2) vaccine. Patients with past histories of psoriasis, urticaria, and local site reactions to a vaccine were more likely to report these same symptoms after the COVID-19 vaccine. CONCLUSION: Patients should be counseled about these potential dermatologic reactions to the COVID-19 vaccines. Most occur within the first few days after vaccination, and are mild and self-limiting. Patients should therefore be encouraged that it is safe to receive the COVID-19 vaccine from a dermatological perspective.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Urticaria , Vaccines , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Humans , Vaccination Hesitancy , Vaccines/adverse effects
5.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 21(6): 2693-2694, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909442
6.
J Cutan Med Surg ; 26(4): 393-397, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731469

ABSTRACT

Accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has changed the landscape of dermatology practice. This manuscript aims to review the role of telemedicine in acne management and provide management recommendations. A literature search of the PubMed and Scopus databases was conducted using keywords "acne," "telemedicine," "teledermatology," "telehealth," "virtual," and "video." Eight articles directly related to telemedicine and acne management were included in the study. In-person vs. telemedicine management of acne patients had high diagnostic concordance and similar efficacy and remission rates. Survey-based studies of acne patients reported high interest and satisfaction and no safety concerns with acne management via telemedicine. Telemedicine was reported as an effective triage tool. Prescription patterns for acne medications during telemedicine vs. in-person visits varied. It is likely that dermatologists will continue to treat acne and other common skin conditions via teledermatology. Therefore, it is important for dermatologists to gain comfort in utilizing virtual visits to diagnose and manage acne patients. Further studies are needed to establish a standardized structural framework for telemedicine visits to optimize patient care and outcomes for acne patients.


Subject(s)
Acne Vulgaris , COVID-19 , Dermatology , Telemedicine , Acne Vulgaris/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Skin appendage disorders ; 130(43):1-4, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1668515

ABSTRACT

Onychomycosis is the most common nail condition seen in clinical practice, with significant impact on quality of life. Clinical examination alone is insufficient for accurate diagnosis, but mycological confirmation can be challenging during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this letter, a multidisciplinary panel of dermatologists, a podiatrist, dermatopathologists, and a mycologist, discuss considerations for mycological sampling during the pandemic.

9.
Skin Appendage Disord ; 130(43): 1-4, 2021 Dec 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1582860

ABSTRACT

Onychomycosis is the most common nail condition seen in clinical practice, with significant impact on quality of life. Clinical examination alone is insufficient for accurate diagnosis, but mycological confirmation can be challenging during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this letter, a multidisciplinary panel of dermatologists, a podiatrist, dermatopathologists, and a mycologist, discuss considerations for mycological sampling during the pandemic.

12.
Int J Womens Dermatol ; 7(5): 856-857, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1487765
18.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5209-5211, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1182167

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 has infected over 109 000 000 people with 2 423 443 deaths as of February 17, 2021. Currently, there are no approved or consistently effective treatments, and conventional vaccines may take several years for development and testing. In silico methods of bioinformatics, vaccinogenomics, immunoinformatics, structural biology, and molecular simulations can be used for more rapid and precise vaccine design. This paper highlights two major immunoinformatics strategies that are used in designing novel and effective vaccines and therapeutics: reverse vaccinology and structural vaccinology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Computational Biology/methods , Vaccinology/methods , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine
20.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(5): e13687, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006125

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is responsible for at least 2 546 527 cases and 175 812 deaths as of April 21, 2020. Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (AD) are common, chronic, inflammatory skin conditions, with immune dysregulation as a shared mechanism; therefore, mainstays of treatment include systemic immunomodulating therapies. It is unknown whether these therapies are associated with increased COVID-19 susceptibility or worse outcomes in infected patients. In this review, we discuss overall infection risks of nonbiologic and biologic systemic medications for psoriasis and AD and provide therapeutic recommendations. In summary, in patients with active infection, systemic conventional medications, the Janus kinase inhibitor tofacitinib, and biologics for psoriasis should be temporarily held until there is more data; in uninfected patients switching to safer alternatives should be considered. Interleukin (IL)-17, IL-12/23, and IL-23 inhibitors are associated with low infection risk, with IL-17 and IL-23 favored over IL-12/23 inhibitors. Pivotal trials and postmarketing data also suggest that IL-17 and IL-23 blockers are safer than tumor necrosis factor alpha blockers. Apremilast, acitretin, and dupilumab have favorable safety data and may be safely initiated and continued in uninfected patients. Without definitive COVID-19 data, these recommendations may be useful in guiding treatment of psoriasis and AD patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis, Atopic/drug therapy , Psoriasis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Immunologic Factors/adverse effects , Interleukin-17/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-23/antagonists & inhibitors , Janus Kinase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/antagonists & inhibitors
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