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EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315545

ABSTRACT

With the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continuing across the world, mass screening of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is a cornerstone of strategies aimed at limiting viral spread within the community. Although mass screening of body temperature with handheld, non-contact infrared thermometers and thermal imagine scanners is now widespread in a kaleidoscope of social and healthcare settings for purpose of detecting febrile individuals bearing SARS-CoV-2 infection, this strategy carries some notable drawbacks, which will be highlighted and discussed in this article. These caveats include the high rate of asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections, the challenging definition of “normal” body temperature, variation of measured values according to the body district, the use of antipyretics, device inaccuracy, impact of environmental temperature, along with the low specificity of this symptom for screening COVID-19 in patients with other febrile conditions. Some pragmatic suggestions will also be endorsed for increasing accuracy and precision of mass screening of body temperature. These encompass the assessment of body temperature (possibly twice) with validated devices, which shall be regularly monitored over time and used following manufacturer’s instructions, the definition of a range of “normal” body temperatures in the local population, patients interrogation on their usual body temperature, standardization of measurement to one body district, allowance of sufficient environmental acclimatization before body temperature check, integration with contact history and other clinical information, as well as exclusion of other possible causes of increased body temperature.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315544

ABSTRACT

Background: Uncertainty still surrounds the nature and origin of the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic outbreak, especially concerning the most probable date of spill over and worldwide propagation.Methods: An electronic search was carried out on Google Trends, with the Italian search terms “febbre” (fever), “tosse” (cough) and “raffreddore” (cold), which are among the most commonly reported COVID-19 symptoms in Italy. The search period was comprised between June 2019 and February 2020, and was limited to the area of the Lombardia region. The number of national influenza cases was also concomitantly retrieved from the Italian Network of Influenza Surveillance.Results: The trend of Google searches for “febbre” (fever), “tosse” (cough) and “raffreddore” (cold) seemed to mirror that of influenza cases, but only after the second week of November 2020. An unexpected peak of Google searches for these symptoms could be noted between the first week of September and the last week of October. This anomalous volume of Google searches could not be directly attributed to influenza spread. This increase was significantly higher compared to the same period of the previous year 2018 (20.4±15.0%;p=0.020). The volumes of Google searches for the three symptoms were also significantly inter-correlated (correlation coefficients between 0.66-0.83;all p<0.001).Conclusions: The results of our analysis seem to confirm that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may have started to circulate in Italy, and more specifically in the region of Lombardia, earlier before the overt pandemic period, probably already at the beginning of September 2019.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-295316

ABSTRACT

We provide here an updated analysis of primary COVID-19 vaccination and vaccine booster doses efficacy, emerging from the ongoing Italian nationwide COVID-19 vaccination campaign. Primary COVID-19 vaccination efficacy was 76-92% within 6 months, decreasing to 34-80% after 6 months. Administration of vaccine booster doses decreased SARS-CoV-2 infections by 65%, COVID-19 related hospitalizations and deaths by 69% and 97% compared to vaccine efficacy after 6 months, but also decreased SARS-CoV-2 infections by 39% compared to vaccine efficacy within 6 months. These results suggest that COVID-19 vaccine booster doses are important for restoring vaccine efficacy and further limiting virus circulation.

5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-293361

ABSTRACT

We provide here an updated analysis of primary COVID-19 vaccination and vaccine booster doses efficacy, emerging from the ongoing Italian nationwide COVID-19 vaccination campaign. Primary COVID-19 vaccination efficacy was 76-92% within 6 months, decreasing to 34-80% after 6 months. Administration of vaccine booster doses decreased SARS-CoV-2 infections by 65%, COVID-19 related hospitalizations and deaths by 69% and 97% compared to vaccine efficacy after 6 months, but also decreased SARS-CoV-2 infections by 39% compared to vaccine efficacy within 6 months. These results suggest that COVID-19 vaccine booster doses are important for restoring vaccine efficacy and further limiting virus circulation.

6.
Hematol., Transfus. Cell Ther. (Impr.) ; 42(2):116-117, 2020.
Article in English | LILACS (Americas), Grey literature | ID: grc-742479
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