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1.
Fam Syst Health ; 2022 May 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860303

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Persons with cystic fibrosis (CF) have higher rates of depression and anxiety compared to the general population. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation guidelines recommend annual screening for depression and anxiety for people with CF. COVID-19 and related social distancing has created challenges for administration of mental health screening by CF centers. The aim of this quality improvement project was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing mental health screening during multidisciplinary telehealth appointments for adult patients with CF during COVID-19, adoption of screening by CF mental health providers, and patient screening results before and after introduction of telehealth. METHOD: Patients were screened via telehealth using the PHQ-9 and GAD-7 between April and October 2020. RESULTS: CF mental health providers implemented a mental health screening process via telehealth and 93.9% of patients seen during that time completed the screening. The screening did not increase clinic visit length and no significant differences were found between rates of depression and anxiety and 2019 clinic rates. DISCUSSION: Implementation of mental health screening during a multidisciplinary telehealth clinic is feasible and can be adopted by providers and patients, even when health systems operations are impacted by COVID-19. It allows CF centers to maintain adherence to mental health screening and treatment guidelines. This method of screening can be applied to other patient populations and systems of care to expand access to mental health services during COVID-19 and beyond. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved).

2.
J Cyst Fibros ; 20 Suppl 3: 57-63, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) programs and people with CF (PwCF) employed various monitoring methods for virtual care during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper characterizes experiences with remote monitoring across the U.S. CF community. METHODS: The CF Foundation (CFF) sponsored distribution of home spirometers (April 2020 to May 2021), surveys to PwCF and CF programs (July to September 2020), and a second program survey (April to May 2021). We used mixed methods to explore access, use, and perspectives regarding the use of remote monitoring in future care. RESULTS: By October 2020, 13,345 spirometers had been distributed, and 19,271 spirometers by May 2021. Programs (n=286) estimated proportions of PwCF with home devices increased over seven months: spirometers (30% to 70%), scales (50% to 70%), oximeters (5% to 10%) with higher estimates in adult programs for spirometers and oximeters. PwCF (n=378) had access to scales (89%), followed by oximeters (48%) and spirometers (47%), often using scales and oximeters weekly, and spirometers monthly. Over both surveys, some programs had no method to collect respiratory specimens for cultures associated with telehealth visits (47%, n=132; 41%, n=118). Most programs (81%) had a process for phlebotomy associated with a telehealth visit, primarily through off-site labs. Both PwCF and programs felt future care should advance remote monitoring and recommended improvements for access, training, and data collection systems. CONCLUSIONS: PwCF and programs experienced unprecedented access to remote monitoring and raised its importance for future care. Improvements to current systems may leverage these shared experiences to augment future care models.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Equipment and Supplies/supply & distribution , Home Care Services , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Spirometry , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Home Care Services/standards , Humans , Models, Organizational , Needs Assessment , Oximetry/instrumentation , Oximetry/methods , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirometry/instrumentation , Spirometry/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/standards , United States/epidemiology
3.
Chest ; 161(5): 1167-1179, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the University of Virginia adult cystic fibrosis (CF) center transitioned from in-person clinical encounters to a model that included interdisciplinary telemedicine. The pandemic presented an unprecedented opportunity to assess the impact of the interdisciplinary telemedicine model on clinical CF outcomes. RESEARCH QUESTION: What are the clinical outcomes of a care model that includes interdisciplinary telemedicine (IDC-TM) compared with in-person clinical care for patients with CF during the COVID-19 pandemic? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Adults with CF were included. The prepandemic year was defined as March 17, 2019, through March 16, 2020, and the pandemic year (PY) was defined as March 17, 2020, through March 16, 2021. Patients were enrolled starting in the PY. Prepandemic data were gathered retrospectively. Telemedicine visits were defined as clinical encounters via secured video communication. Hybrid visits were in-person evaluations by physician, with in-clinic video communication by other team members. In-person visits were encounters with in-person providers only. All encounters included previsit screening. Outcomes were lung function, BMI, exacerbations, and antibiotic use. FEV1 percent predicted, exacerbations, and antibiotic use were adjusted for the effect of elexacaftor/tezacaftor/ivacaftor treatment. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-four patients participated. One hundred ten patients were analyzed (mean age, 35 years; range, 18-69 years). Ninety-five percent had access to telemedicine (n = 105). Telemedicine visits accounted for 64% of encounters (n = 260), hybrid visits with telemedicine support accounted for 28% of encounters (n = 114), and in-person visits accounted for 7% of encounters (n = 30). No difference in lung function or exacerbation rate during the PY was found. BMI increased from 25 to 26 kg/m2 (t100 = -4.72; P < .001). Antibiotic use decreased from 316 to 124 episodes (z = 8.81; P < .0001). INTERPRETATION: This CF care model, which includes IDC-TM, successfully monitored lung function and BMI, identified exacerbations, and followed guidelines-based care during the pandemic. A significant decrease in antibiotic use suggests that social mitigation strategies were protective. TRIAL REGISTRY: ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT04402801; URL: www. CLINICALTRIALS: gov.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Telemedicine , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/drug therapy , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
4.
BMJ Open Qual ; 10(3)2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373969

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Foundation chronic care guidelines recommend monitoring spirometry during quarterly multidisciplinary visits to identify early lung function decline. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the CF adult clinic at University of Virginia (UVA) transitioned from the classic CF care model to a model that included quarterly multidisciplinary telemedicine visits. While using telemedicine, CF care needed to include spirometry monitoring. Only a fraction of adult CF patients at UVA owned and used home spirometers (HS) in March 2020. AIM: The specific aims of this quality improvement (QI) project were to increase the percentage of eligible adult CF patients who owned an HSs from 37% to 85% and to increase the percentage of adult CF patients seen at UVA with available spirometry in telemedicine from 50% to 95% by 31 December 2020. METHODS: Following the Model for Improvement QI methodology, a standardised process was developed for monitoring forced expiratory volume in 1 s with HS during multidisciplinary telemedicine visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. INTERVENTION: (1) HSs were distributed to eligible patients and (2) Home spirometry was monitored in eligible patients with each telemedicine visit and results were used for clinical care decisions. RESULTS: Both specific aims were achieved ahead of expected date. In March 2020, the beginning of the pandemic, 37% (49/131) of patients owned an HS and 50% (9/18) of patients seen via telemedicine performed spirometry at home. By September 2020, 97% (127/131) of adult patients at UVA owned an HS and by October 2020, 96% (24/25) of patients provided spirometry results during their telemedicine encounters. CONCLUSION: Employing QI tools to standardise the process of monitoring spirometry data with home devices via telemedicine is reliable and sustainable and can be replicated across centres that provide care for patients with CF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Telemedicine , Adult , Cystic Fibrosis/diagnosis , Cystic Fibrosis/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Spirometry
5.
Ther Adv Respir Dis ; 15: 17534666211037459, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369479

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Outcomes in cystic fibrosis are influenced by multiple factors, including social determinants of health. Low socioeconomic status has been shown to be associated with lung function decline, increased exacerbation rates, increased health care utilization, and decreased survival in cystic fibrosis. The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the US economy, placing people with cystic fibrosis at risk for negative impacts due to changes in social determinants of health. METHODS: To characterize the impact of COVID-19-related changes in social determinants of health in the adult cystic fibrosis population, a social determinants of health questionnaire was designed and distributed to patients as part of a quality improvement project. RESULTS: Of 132 patients contacted, 76 (57.6%) responses were received. Of these responses, 22 (28.9%) answered yes to at least one question that indicated an undesired change in social determinants of health. Patients with stable employment prior to COVID-19 were more likely to endorse undesired change in all domains of the questionnaire, and the undesired changes were most likely to be related to employment, insurance security, and access to medications. Patients receiving disability were more likely to report hardship related to utilities and food security compared with patients previously employed or unemployed. Of patients endorsing risk of socioeconomic hardship, 21 (95.5%) were contacted by a social worker and provided resources. CONCLUSION: Utilizing a social determinants of health questionnaire to screen for social instability in the context of COVID-19 is feasible and beneficial for patients with cystic fibrosis. Identifying social issues early during the pandemic and implementing processes to provide resources may help patients with cystic fibrosis mitigate social hardship and maintain access to health care and medications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Determinants of Health , Adult , Employment , Female , Humans , Insurance, Health , Male , Middle Aged , Social Class , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(2): 193-199, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-759913

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The University of Virginia's (UVA's) adult cystic fibrosis (CF) program implemented a rapid and successful transition to telemedicine care mid-March of 2020 in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In May 2020, the adult UVA CF program redesigned the care model to adjust to the reopening of ambulatory operations and introduced hybrid clinics. The goal remained to minimize person-to-person contacts for patients and care team members (CTMs) while ensuring patient access to quarterly, coproduced, synchronous, multidisciplinary CF care, similar to pre-COVID-19 era regular CF care. Methods: Using quality improvement tools, the UVA adult CF program created a standardized hybrid model of care for in-clinic visits, which included combined components of in-person and synchronous virtual interactions with members of the multidisciplinary team. Results: A total of 16 hybrid visits occurred between May 14 and June 11, 2020. All hybrid visits were multidisciplinary and fulfilled patient requests to see CTMs. All patients seen by hybrid encounter participated in coproduced agenda setting, underwent spirometry, and obtained blood work; 75% provided sputum for surveillance culture. Each hybrid visit type was attended by an average of four CTMs and amounted to 63 separate interactions. Of these interactions, 28 were completed virtually, reducing in-person contacts and personal protection equipment utilization by 44% compared with a fully in-person model of care. Conclusions: Combining in-person and telehealth components in a multidisciplinary CF care model reduces patient and staff interactions and personal protective equipment utilization. The hybrid model of in-person/remote combined care enables reliable access to biological data to support medical decision making while mitigating the risks of person-to-person contact for patients and staff.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19 , Cystic Fibrosis , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Humans , Patient Safety
7.
Telemed J E Health ; 26(8): 978-984, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-154639

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has become a major world health problem. All U.S. states have advised their cystic fibrosis (CF) populations to socially isolate. Major health care payors such as Medicare and most private insurance companies have agreed to reimburse health care providers for telemedicine and telephone visits. Methods: The CF adult team at the University of Virginia (UVA) transitioned from face-to-face clinics to multidisciplinary telemedicine clinics by using WebEx® (Cisco Systems, San Jose, CA), a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) compliant platform. Interventions: Patients were contacted before scheduled visits and triaged into: (1) patients eligible for the multidisciplinary telemedicine clinic, (2) patients to be seen in clinic urgently due to acute needs, and (3) stable patients who can be rescheduled at a later time. Ineligible patients for the telemedicine clinic due to lack of access to technology were followed up via telephone. Results: A total of 63 patients were scheduled to be seen in the UVA clinic over 4 weeks, 10 clinic days. Of these patients, 20 (32%) rescheduled their appointment. In addition, 2 patients (3%) were seen in clinic for acute needs and 38 (60%) were seen by the multidisciplinary team through telemedicine. Conclusions: In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, implementing a telemedicine clinic process that serves the needs of a multidisciplinary care team is paramount to preserving the CF care model. Through a systematic design and test process, a feasible and sustainable program was created that can be utilized by other multidisciplinary programs to adapt to their context.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cystic Fibrosis/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Appointments and Schedules , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Insurance, Health, Reimbursement , Pandemics , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage , United States
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