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1.
EClinicalMedicine ; 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-689274

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe ferocious global assault of COVID-19 continues Critically ill patients witnessed significantly higher mortality than severe and moderate ones Herein, we aim to comprehensively delineate clinical features of COVID-19 and explore risk factors of developing critical disease

3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(29): e20781, 2020 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676380

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: No specific anti-virus drugs or vaccines have been available for the treatment of COVID-19. Integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine has been proposed as a therapeutic option with substantial applications in China. This protocol is proposed for a systematic review and meta-analysis that aims to evaluate the efficacy of integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine treatment on patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Ten databases including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CIHAHL, Web of Science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Database (VIP), Wanfang database, China Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and Chinese Biomedical Literature Service System (SinoMed) will be searched. All published randomized controlled trials, clinical controlled trials, case-control, and case series that meet the pre-specified eligibility criteria will be included. Primary outcome measures include mortality, clinical recovery rate, duration of fever, progression rate from mild or moderate to severe, improvement of symptoms, biomarkers of laboratory examination and changes in computed tomography. Secondary outcomes include dosage of hormonotherapy, incidence and severity of adverse events and quality of life. Study selection, data extraction and assessment of bias risk will be conducted by 2 reviewers independently. RevMan software (V.5.3.5) will be used to perform data synthesis. Subgroup and sensitivity analysis will be performed when necessary. The strength of evidence will be assessed by the GRADE system. RESULTS: This study will provide a well-reported and high-quality synthesis on the efficacy of integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine treatment on patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: This systematic review protocol will be helpful for providing evidence of whether integrative traditional Chinese and western medicine treatment is an effective therapeutic approach for patients with COVID-19. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval is unnecessary as no individual patient or privacy data is collected. The results of this study will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed scientific journal and/or conference presentation. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42020167205.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Medicine, Chinese Traditional/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Biomarkers/analysis , Case-Control Studies , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Humans , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Research Design , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Treatment Outcome
5.
Epilepsia ; 61(6): e49-e53, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-637375

ABSTRACT

Our aim was to clarify the incidence and risk of acute symptomatic seizures in people with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This multicenter retrospective study enrolled people with COVID-19 from January 18 to February 18, 2020 at 42 government-designated hospitals in Hubei province, the epicenter of the epidemic in China; Sichuan province; and Chongqing municipality. Data were collected from medical records by 11 neurologists using a standard case report form. A total of 304 people were enrolled, of whom 108 had a severe condition. None in this cohort had a known history of epilepsy. Neither acute symptomatic seizures nor status epilepticus was observed. Two people had seizurelike symptoms during hospitalization due to acute stress reaction and hypocalcemia, and 84 (27%) had brain insults or metabolic imbalances during the disease course known to increase the risk of seizures. There was no evidence suggesting an additional risk of acute symptomatic seizures in people with COVID-19. Neither the virus nor potential risk factors for seizures seem to be significant risks for the occurrence of acute symptomatic seizures in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hypoxia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Seizures/epidemiology , Water-Electrolyte Imbalance/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sepsis/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
6.
J Affect Disord ; 275: 188-193, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-633860

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although studies have suggested experiencing the epidemic of severe infectious diseases increased the prevalence of mental health problems, the association between COVID-19 epidemic and risk of anxiety and depression symptom in college students in China was unclear. METHODS: A large cross-sectional online survey with 44,447 college students was conducted in Guangzhou, China. The Zung's Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D Scale) were used to define the anxiety and depression symptom, respectively. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between COVID-19 epidemic and risk of anxiety and depression symptom. RESULTS: The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptom was 7.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.5%, 8.0%) and 12.2% (95%CI: 11.9%, 12.5%), respectively. Compared with students who reported have not infected or suspected cases in family members and relatives, students who reported having confirmed (OR=4.06; 95%CI: 1.62, 10.19; P = 0.003), and suspected (OR=2.11; 95%CI: 1.11, 4.00; P = 0.023) cases in family members and relatives had higher risk of depression symptom. Additionally, the proportions of students with anxiety and depression symptom reported more demand of psychological knowledge and interventions than those without (P<0.001). LIMITATIONS: All the data in this study was collected through online questionnaire, and we did not evaluate the reliability and validity. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of anxiety and depression symptom was relatively low in college students, but the COVID-19 epidemic-related factors might be associated with higher depression symptom risk.

7.
Neurology ; 2020 Jun 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606935

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate new-onset neurologic impairments associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: A retrospective multicenter cohort study conducted between 18 January and 20 March 2020 including people with confirmed COVID-19 from 56 hospitals officially designated in three Chinese regions; data were extracted from medical records. New-onset neurologic events as assessed by neurology consultants based on manifestations, clinical examination and investigations, in which critical events included disorders of consciousness, stroke, CNS infection, seizures and status epilepticus. RESULTS: We enrolled 917 people with average age 48.7 years and 55% were male. The frequency of new onset critical neurologic events was 3.5% (32/917) overall and 9.4% (30/319) among those with severe or critical COVID-19. These were impaired consciousness (n=25) or/and stroke (n=10). The risk of critical neurologic events was highly associated with age above 60 years and previous history of neurological conditions. Non-critical events were seen in less than 1% (7/917), including muscle cramp, unexplained headache, occipital neuralgia, tic and tremor. Brain CT in 28 people led to new findings in nine. Findings from lumbar puncture in three with suspected CNS infection, unexplained headache or severe occipital neuralgia were unremarkable. CONCLUSIONS: People with COVID-19 aged over 60 and neurologic comorbidities were at higher risk of developing critical neurologic impairment, mainly impaired consciousness and cerebrovascular accidents. Brain CT should be considered when new-onset brain injury is suspected, especially in people under sedation or showing an unexplained decline in consciousness. Evidence of direct acute insult of SARS-COV-2 to the CNS is still lacking.

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